Mozart — Symphony No. 40 - Molto Allegro
Album: Mozart Symphonies 40 & 41 - Chamber Orchestra of Europe, Sir Georg Solti
Avg rating:
8.9

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Total ratings: 636
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Released: 1983
Length: 8:18
Plays (last 30 days): 1
(no lyrics available)
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 rocklandlove wrote:
Perennial peeve from a longtime RP fan: I SO wish you would post the ACTUAL name of the symphony, conductors, etc. Classical music is not wallpaper!

 
Agree. The conductor and musicians of this interpretation deserve recognition as well as the composer.
Just got back from a hike through the snow-covered sage brush steppe and this came on.  Stupendous.  
Love it. Keep  playin' the hits.  Mozart has never been off the album chart. 
Ssomehow, Bill seems to know just when to toss one of these our way.
Perennial peeve from a longtime RP fan: I SO wish you would post the ACTUAL name of the symphony, conductors, etc. Classical music is not wallpaper!

Thank you Mozart and RP

9 - O U T S T A N D I N G  to me 


https://media.giphy.com/media/12wDQ40pvIOqxa/giphy.gif
This takes me back to 1971.There was a pirate radio ship, RNI or Radio North Sea International, moored off the Dutch coast (though it also moved to the English coast for a while), which played the Waldo de los Rios version of this extensively. Due to the airtime it got on RNI the track ended up topping the charts in Holland and reaching the top 10 in the UK. Listening on medium wave wasn't always easy - the UK government broadcast a jamming signal, a constant beeping, so you had to position your receiver to get the maximum RNI and the minimum jamming. Anyway, for me this track (and also Band of Gold by Freda Payne) will always bring back fond memories of RNI and all its DJ's.
PSD got me here... don't even remember the lame whiny song I escaped! {#Yes}
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I hit the PSD to get away from a crooning moaner crying in his beer. And what I found! For the love of Amadeus! 
 
gif of George Costanza dancing joyously up forest path
Last play: Dec 13, 2007

I think we're due for a revival, what do you think Bill?
Did want to hear Pink Floyd's Comfortably Numb and the PSD button brought me to this instead.

I'd make that trade 100 out of 100 times!

Thank You...

Just what I needed at this moment
Godlike indeed! Thanks Bill!
Regrettably, my Dad (who's a seriously hot clarinet player) rehearsed this to death and beyond when I was younger, so I've never developed an appreciation of the masterpiece :(
Thanks Bill.
Genius...  such a profound piece.   Cannot imaging this sort of stuff coming these days.
Too many notes! ;-)

teh King in "Amadeus" 

Ja, das ist gut!
I was thinking of this tune the other day, but it was the "pop" version by Waldo De Los Rios which was a substantial hit in the UK when I was a kid. Spooky.
wferrier wrote:
In Mozart's time musicians were considered craftsmen and expected to work with set musical phrases. That's how it was done—the same was true of all his contemporaries and immediate predecessors. This is the actual definition of the classical era in music! This fact is well known. Mozart isn't respected for originality, he is known for taking those phrases and mixing and matching them in such a way that surpassed everyone before him, and many after. Mozart was compiling better music at 20 than Haydn was at 40. Again well known fact. Mixing and matching modular phrases is still done, in all styles of music, even today, country, rock, jazz, blues, and everything else just about. Listen to symphony 21 in C. The beginning is a dumpy little tune, one of those simple melodies that as a kid Mozart was expected to improvise on. Now listen to the entire symphony keeping that it is variations on the dumpy tune. It's extraordinary—that's the genius of Mozart.
:clap: Perfect summation.
prefect segue from Vlatko and Miroslav and a 10 be itself
jenakle wrote:
OMG YES what is it caaalllled?!??!!? :frustrated:
Its called Outnumbered! Damn I used to play that game all the time. You are in this television station and go in and out of rooms looking for the Master of Mischief's hideout. When you are in the hallway this music plays and there is this robot that you have to zap with a gun. Now whenever I hear Mozart's Symphony no 40, that is what I think about.
ktnsb wrote:
There used to be a game you could buy in any well-stocked sheet music store, I forget the name of it but it was about Mozart. The way it worked was you rolled a pair of dice, and a particular musical phrase was associated with different dice combinations. You won the game by writing a longer Mozart composition, or something like that. The point was that just by rolling dice you were putting together actual Mozart compositions, like a theme from this symphony or that horn concerto. Could you do that with any other composer? Certainly not with just two dice. Mozart was all formula, hardly any inspiration. People like his nice melodies and feel like it's uplifting and all, which is great, but the reality is that hideglue down there is right: he was very prolific, but if you want originality in that time period look to Haydn. Just my opinion, obviously.
In Mozart's time musicians were considered craftsmen and expected to work with set musical phrases. That's how it was done—the same was true of all his contemporaries and immediate predecessors. This is the actual definition of the classical era in music! This fact is well known. Mozart isn't respected for originality, he is known for taking those phrases and mixing and matching them in such a way that surpassed everyone before him, and many after. Mozart was compiling better music at 20 than Haydn was at 40. Again well known fact. Mixing and matching modular phrases is still done, in all styles of music, even today, country, rock, jazz, blues, and everything else just about. Listen to piano concerto 21 in C. The beginning is a dumpy little tune, one of those simple melodies that as a kid Mozart was expected to improvise on. Now listen to the entire concerto keeping that it is variations on the dumpy tune. It's extraordinary—that's the genius of Mozart.
Stunning....I salute you Bill
Nice pick - just heard this at a concert this past weekend - a nice reminder of an interesting mix between a jazz group with a symphony orchestra that was outstanding.
mgkiwi wrote:
Only on RP - diversity - excellent!
Alors. C'est vrais!
Only on RP - diversity - excellent!
:meditate: Unereichbares hat der kleine Wolfgang Amadeus seinerzeit gezaubert.
jadewahoo wrote:
Gawd! I can't stand classical music. It may be time to leave RP, as there has been wa-a-a-y-y too much of it being played as of late.
If you're THAT sensitive, I'm surprised that you even listen to RP. You might be missed. :wave: I too am not a huge 'classical' fan but this just rocks! It's conventions are way different but the innovation and passion of this work were likely just as innovative as we might attribute to our favorite songs here.
i gotta say: i am really feeling this
ulibcn wrote:
Only a highly gifted DJ is able to fit Mozart into a program like this. Bill, you are the Mozart of Internet Radio!
I was just wondering what Bill will segue into right after this... it would be interesting to see.
so good. so good!
ktnsb wrote:
Mozart was all formula, hardly any inspiration. People like his nice melodies and feel like it's uplifting and all, which is great, but the reality is that hideglue down there is right: he was very prolific, but if you want originality in that time period look to Haydn. Just my opinion, obviously.
And a laughable one at that. Reminds me of this scene from Manhattan where Diane Keaton and Michael Murphy cut down some intellectual greats in order to sound super sophisticated: Yale(Michael Murphy): (to Mary) "Gustav Mahler? Hmmm, I think he may be a candidate for the old Academy... " (to Isaac) "...Oh, we've invented the Academy of the Overrated - for such notables as Gustav Mahler..." Mary(Diane Keaton): "And Isak Dinesen, Karl Jung." Yale: "F. Scott Fitzgerald..." Mary: "Lenny Bruce! We can't forget Lenny Bruce now, can we? And how about Norman Mailer?" Isaac(Woody Allen): (disgusted) "I think those people are all terrific, every one that you've mentioned. What about Mozart? You guys don't want to leave him out. I mean, while you're trashing people..."
ktnsb wrote:
There used to be a game you could buy in any well-stocked sheet music store, I forget the name of it but it was about Mozart. The way it worked was you rolled a pair of dice, and a particular musical phrase was associated with different dice combinations. You won the game by writing a longer Mozart composition, or something like that. The point was that just by rolling dice you were putting together actual Mozart compositions, like a theme from this symphony or that horn concerto. Could you do that with any other composer? Certainly not with just two dice. Mozart was all formula, hardly any inspiration.
This would be cool to code up and put on-line! I'd listen
jadewahoo wrote:
Gawd! I can't stand classical music. It may be time to leave RP, as there has been wa-a-a-y-y too much of it being played as of late.
Please do, if you mind and ears are not open to different styles of music.
Bill is playing gorgeous music this morning. Thanks for that!
There used to be a game you could buy in any well-stocked sheet music store, I forget the name of it but it was about Mozart. The way it worked was you rolled a pair of dice, and a particular musical phrase was associated with different dice combinations. You won the game by writing a longer Mozart composition, or something like that. The point was that just by rolling dice you were putting together actual Mozart compositions, like a theme from this symphony or that horn concerto. Could you do that with any other composer? Certainly not with just two dice. Mozart was all formula, hardly any inspiration. People like his nice melodies and feel like it's uplifting and all, which is great, but the reality is that hideglue down there is right: he was very prolific, but if you want originality in that time period look to Haydn. Just my opinion, obviously.
Gawd! I can't stand classical music. It may be time to leave RP, as there has been wa-a-a-y-y too much of it being played as of late.
Rock me Amadeus! :boohoo::boohoo::boohoo::boohoo::boohoo::boohoo:
I'm quite enjoying this...and the timing for it right now is perfect!
gabbadar wrote:
The one with the robots, and an evil doctor? I played that one, and I was thinking the same thing! DOS on my 286DX16 with 4 megs RAM. :biggrin:
OMG YES what is it caaalllled?!??!!? :frustrated:
themotion wrote:
Ozark Trail all the way.
may age me, but I remember our elem schools first computers having that green on black baby carmen sandiego series were cool, so was the show the original sims city where you built a town and could set natural (or un- ...godzilla!) disasters on it the one bugging me was math/problem solving..robots, evil scientist chase...laser beams (but no sharks) man, this is really gonna bug me...THIS music is the background if that helps anyone ??? *oh well*
Beautiful. Simply Beautiful. :daisy:
ChardRemains wrote:
He's not, and he has a point. Much of Mozart's work was considered the "Sugar Sugar" of its day.
Izzat true? Hmmmm. Thanks for the info.
electronicthroat wrote:
I miss PC games from the 90's.
Ozark Trail all the way.
Ahhh thank you so much, Bill! :meditate: :pray:
AHHHHHHHHHHH Mozart!! thank you Bill