The Beatles — A Day In The Life
Album: Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band
Avg rating:
9.2

Your rating:
Total ratings: 3538
Ratings histogram:
Released: 1967
Length: 4:46
Plays (last 30 days): 1
I read the news today, oh boy
About a lucky man who made the grade
And though the news was rather sad
Well, I just had to laugh

I saw the photograph
He blew his mind out in a car
He didn't notice that the lights had changed
A crowd of people stood and stared
They'd seen his face before
Nobody was really sure if he was from the House of Lords

I saw a film today, oh boy
The English army had just won the war
A crowd of people turned away
But I just had to look
Having read the book
I'd love to turn you on

Woke up, fell out of bed
Dragged a comb across my head
Found my way downstairs and drank a cup
And looking up, I noticed I was late

Found my coat and grabbed my hat
Made the bus in seconds flat
Found my way upstairs and had a smoke
And somebody spoke and I went into a dream

I read the news today, oh boy
Four thousand holes in Blackburn, Lancashire
And though the holes were rather small
They had to count them all
Now they know how many holes it takes to fill the Albert Hall

I'd love to turn you on
Comments (839)add comment
Yes !  This is a strong 9 - OUTSTANDING  to me
 mcampbellbell@gmail.com wrote:
You failed to run right to the end of the track -  the bit in the run-off grooves of the album. What was this repetitive bit at the end that we all agonised over at the time? Did we ever find out?

 
Maybe it's not on the CD? I am lucky to own an original vinyl copy {#Jump}
 Stephen_Phillips wrote:

Visceral reaction to other people - not the music.  Music is emotive but knee jerk reaction to other people's views is not subjective - it is jealousy wrapped in spitefulness. There is no right and wrong in music - but there is right and wrong in people.
 

Thank you!
{#Meditate}{#Notworthy}{#Meditate}
You failed to run right to the end of the track -  the bit in the run-off grooves of the album. What was this repetitive bit at the end that we all agonised over at the time? Did we ever find out?

Transcendent.


I always found it weird that after Paul lights up upstairs, he hears John wailing in his dream.

 A foreshadowing perhaps?
 Majestic wrote:
Give this a 10 if you like... you are still underrating it. 

 


Brilliant. Timeless. 
 DavidS_UK wrote:

It's not really a '1', it's just that the fanbois adulation and immediate '10s' for anything related to the four mop tops sometimes gets to them, and a visceral, knee jerk reaction kicks in.  But that's music, it's EMOTIVE and not rational, so let's live with everyone's views, even when we really don't see where they are coming from, after all it is totally subjective, there is no right or wrong

 
Visceral reaction to other people - not the music.  Music is emotive but knee jerk reaction to other people's views is not subjective - it is jealousy wrapped in spitefulness. There is no right and wrong in music - but there is right and wrong in people.
Give this a 10 if you like... you are still underrating it. 
 Kilroy wrote:
50 RP listeners rated this song a 1.
I am completely dismayed. How in the hell is this song a 1 in anyone's book???? 

 
It's not really a '1', it's just that the fanbois adulation and immediate '10s' for anything related to the four mop tops sometimes gets to them, and a visceral, knee jerk reaction kicks in.  But that's music, it's EMOTIVE and not rational, so let's live with everyone's views, even when we really don't see where they are coming from, after all it is totally subjective, there is no right or wrong
 lemmoth wrote:

By a clue my friend.  Just take a listen to the acoustic demo and then the final version of Strawberry Fields for one example.

 
when Lennon (the writer and creator) told Martin how it should sound he did it like the excellent engineer that he was,
.
or as Lennon himself said,...
.

 
RIP Sir George Martin
 Skydog wrote:
i am sick about hearing how George Martin was the 5th Beatle and responsible for their sound
i am of course over generalizing here but Lennon wrote the songs, McCartney produced them and Martin was an engineer 

 
By a clue my friend.  Just take a listen to the acoustic demo and then the final version of Strawberry Fields for one example.
50 RP listeners rated this song a 1.
I am completely dismayed. How in the hell is this song a 1 in anyone's book???? 
 Stingray wrote:

Do not forget GEORGE MARTIN, folks,

he was the true mastermind behind the BEATLES!

Without him, that had "just" been a great band!

With him they were "THE BEATLES"!

In my opinion Martin was worth 51%!



 
Amen to that.   As much as I love their early work (that they actually performed live for a while), it is their studio work that made them the greatest band of all time to so many (not to mention almost acceptable to parents :)—and Martin was clearly the studio genius.  The boys were clearly brilliant songwriters and good musicians too (Paul, particularly accomplished on bass).  But none of the boys had the musical training required to create all that studio magic.  Martin was the man, indeed.    
In twelve and a half months, this song will be FIFTY years old.

Discuss.... 
 Nerubo wrote:
...Stealth update: Those tracking the decline of Western civilization will be dismayed to note that, as of this date, the number of 1 ratings has crept up to 50.
 
Those tracking the bias of RP listeners who rate songs may note that five of the top fifteen songs on that list are by Pink Floyd.  Doesn't say much about eclecticism.
As of today (October 12, 2015), 65% of listeners who rated this gave it a 10.  Makes me wonder if this is the song with the highest number of 10 ratings.

Nope, several songs beat it. Looking at the RP Classics list, some German dude named Beethoven got a 67% 10 share for Moonlight Sonata, and Pink Floyd got 70% 10s for "Echoes".

The number of ratings on "Echoes" is a little low for a fair comparison (Around 200 versus around 2000 for the others). As I recall, the RP Classics takes ratings and then factors in number of ratings to keep things from getting silly, which probably explains why "Echoes" is only number 12.

The masterful "A Day in the Life" currently ranks at #4 on the RP Classics list.

Stealth update: Those tracking the decline of Western civilization will be dismayed to note that, as of this date, the number of 1 ratings has crept up to 50.
 
one of the most amazing songs ever. lennon-mccartney-martin magic. 
 JsDad wrote:
Who are the 48 people who gave this a one, and what the hell were they doing on this site?

 
Americans most likely - country and AOR fans! 
one of the best Beatles albums to be sure! {#Hearteyes}
I just do not get it.  My head says that the Beatles are good but my ears just scream 'PSD'!
The most important song of its era, and one of the best. But that doesn't stop me from changing the station if I don't feel like listening to it.
Remember the local radio station playing this the morning after Lennon was shot. Never was more meaningful than when I heard it that time!!
Big L time is 3 o'clock. Radio London is now closing down. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hqjrIhMwU8U

 
Took a 300 level course in English Usage and this was an assigned paper, as in:
This is the single best English song in the last Century: Discuss. 
'nuff said. 
BTW, the fellow credited as "the counter" on this record was later shot dead by the police in LA, for holding an air rifle.
 JsDad wrote:
Who are the 48 people who gave this a one, and what the hell were they doing on this site?

 
{#Lol}
Really amazing, even after — or especially because — all these years! I recall singing it as a kid, thinking it was cool; it was in the mind-bending territory of The Moody Blues, The Who, Yes, King Crimson and the like... Some fine examples of Songwriting at its best.
Who are the 48 people who gave this a one, and what the hell were they doing on this site?
Question: what band was actually first with releasing this kind of "trippy" RnR music?

Was it this album or was it something from Buffalo Springfield when Neil Young was exploding with ideas?  
11. better than godlike (and, as the man said, more popular than jesus) {#Bananajam}
Perhaps the most bizarre performance I have ever witnessed (trust me, there have been many) was Miley Cyrus doing a cover of this during Art Basel, Miami.
i quote sir paul mccartney:   "we were just this great little band"
'nuf ced 
Different places in my journey to this moment with certain songs that solidified the time, place, people, history, and future.

Long ago, far away where people very much like us dressed different, spoke differently and had a different future than we do now.

This song is fixed in my life and I have never been able to remember it at any other particular place or time. 
 Sloggydog wrote:
I hear what you're saying but if you are going to rank them #1 must be the White album.  No idea what filler you speak of but to have that many awesome songs must make it #1 surely.
 
The White album gets my vote as the Beatles best.

In a recent "AllMusic.com" poll, listeners were asked what their favourite Beatles album was.
The Results:

1) Revolver
2) The White Album
3) Rubber Soul
4) Abbey Road
5) Sgt. Pepper

Let it Be placed near the bottom but I would put it ahead of Sgt. Pepper.
That said, this song is one of the greatest ever.
 idiot_wind wrote:
I've heard people call this the greatest Beatles song. 

 
If you can christen one Beatle song as the greatest (hard to do), it would probably be this one. There had never been a piece of popular music like it before and even today it's still unique. I remember reading somewhere that people remember where they were when they first heard it, like hearing when Kennedy was assasinated.
a Beatles song that I do like
 lemmoth wrote:

As they were released I believe that Revolver is superior to Pepper as is Abbey Road, and White (despite some filler) is slightly ahead.  Rubber Soul is slightly behind.

Now - if it were recorded today, Sgt. Pepper would also include the magnificent duo of Penny Lane and Strawberry Fields forever, which would, in my opinion put it close to a dead heat with Revolver (with its two masterpiece singles, Something and Come Together).

 
Not to quibble, but 'Something' and 'Come Together' are both on Abbey Road not Revolver.
Number 1 Beatle song; greatest song in Rock n Roll history.
One measure and everything comes to a halt...
With that last orchestral chord, the next song could easily be Nothing Compares To You by Sinead O'Connor
Yes, superb composite piece.
As previously mentioned, only George Martin could have known what to do and how to do it - totally essential part of the Beatles!
 GTT wrote:
I love the way John's singing is so understated throughout, as if he knows that the greatness of the words and the music will do all the work for him; I love the way the swirling orchestra veers into chaos in the middle, with just a single, steady tap on the drums keeping things tied to reality; the everyday chipper ordinariness of Paul's section; the return to John's dark, cynical, almost despairing vision; the orchestra veering  into chaos again at the end, suddenly punctuated by the eternal om of the single piano note.  I wish I could say more, but for me this song is the height of it all, the whole rock movement from the beginning until now.
 
Nice post, GTT!  {#Cheers}
I love the way John's singing is so understated throughout, as if he knows that the greatness of the words and the music will do all the work for him; I love the way the swirling orchestra veers into chaos in the middle, with just a single, steady tap on the drums keeping things tied to reality; the everyday chipper ordinariness of Paul's section; the return to John's dark, cynical, almost despairing vision; the orchestra veering  into chaos again at the end, suddenly punctuated by the eternal om of the single piano note.  I wish I could say more, but for me this song is the height of it all, the whole rock movement from the beginning until now.
 Thank you Lazarus, I went to the top shelf of my closet and St. Pepper was not there; proving there is a big hole in my existence {#Notworthy}
Lazarus wrote:
If you want to appreciate the true literary impact of this album, in addition to the music, you must hold the original album in your hands, and look at the back cover...  the lyrics are printed on the back like a book of poems...

Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band has a thematic literary structure...  in "Within You Without You", the first song on the second side, the lyrics say,

We were talking—about the space
between us all
And the people—who hide themselves
behind a wall of illusion

in "A Day In The Life", which is the song at the end of the album, the lyrics say,

Now we know how many holes it takes
to fill the Albert Hall.
I'd love to turn you on

this album emotively describes the existential complexity and absurdity of human existence...  Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band is the best album in infinity... 

 


Cutting off the end of Day In A Life is unforgivable Bill.   I expect that from Commercial Stations or the ones where the DJ's love the sound of their own voice.    Epic Fail !!
If you want to appreciate the true literary impact of this album, in addition to the music, you must hold the original album in your hands, and look at the back cover...  the lyrics are printed on the back like a book of poems...

Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band has a thematic literary structure...  in "Within You Without You", the first song on the second side, the lyrics say,

We were talking—about the space
between us all
And the people—who hide themselves
behind a wall of illusion

in "A Day In The Life", which is the song at the end of the album, the lyrics say,

Now we know how many holes it takes
to fill the Albert Hall.
I'd love to turn you on

this album emotively describes the existential complexity and absurdity of human existence...  Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band is the best album in infinity...