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Gustavo Santaolalla — De Ushuaia a La Quiaca
Album: Motorcycle Diaries Soundtrack
Avg rating:
7.9

Your rating:
Total ratings: 2287









Released: 2004
Length: 2:47
Plays (last 30 days): 2
(Instrumental)
Comments (146)add comment
 westslope wrote:

This is sounding even better on subsequent listens.    Perhaps I  should finally get around to watching the film?


I love places like the Argentinian part of Tierra del Fuego.    I highly recommend it along with Los Torres del Paine and more.    If you like spectacular mountains, mountain glacier and rugged fjord views.

Just be warned that the weather in that region and in particular along the Atlantic coast of Tierra del Fuego can be a little rough.   Un pocito....



Such a beautiful song. And I do highly recommend watching The Motorcycle Diaries. A truly fantastic story which ended up changing his values. 
This came on via my Bluetooth helmet communicator whilst riding my motorcycle through the Moroccan High Atlas recently. Made my trip even more spectacular.  
Amazing music, such grace.  
Where is the 12 button?  Soooo good.
Inspiring.
This is sounding even better on subsequent listens.    Perhaps I  should finally get around to watching the film?


I love places like the Argentinian part of Tierra del Fuego.    I highly recommend it along with Los Torres del Paine and more.    If you like spectacular mountains, mountain glacier and rugged fjord views.

Just be warned that the weather in that region and in particular along the Atlantic coast of Tierra del Fuego can be a little rough.   Un pocito....
❤️Masterpiece 🙏
Amazing music...      
"The charango is a small Andean stringed instrument of the lute family, which probably originated in the Quechua and Aymara populations in the territory of the Altiplano in post-Colonial times, after European stringed instruments were introduced by the Spanish during colonialization." from wikipedia

This composition has some of the most exquisite  and poignant combinations of instruments of antiquity and modernity. Thank you, Gustavo. Time to watch and listen to this movie again. And reread the book.
Wow nice instermntal
What an incredible piece.  Makes me feel emotional for some reason.  Tugs at a heartstring somewhere ...

edit:  I've seen the film now and it all makes sense...
Such a beautiful song. Reminds me of of my wife and when we first met.
Bill & Rebecca - just remember that we couldn't do what we do without you two (and I assume an army of minions!) wdb/usa
full of awesome wonder  
 scrubbrush wrote:
Zamfir called...  

Wrong number.  Sounds like a quena, not a zampoña.
I was in Ushuaia a few days ago.  Great tune for Tierra del Fuego!
 TerryS wrote:

Having been to Punta Arenas, but not Ushuaia, every day I feel like that. Instead, I piddle around on the bike in the hundreds of clicks instead of the 10  thousand that would be needed.

Moral: do it while you can, before you think of all the reasons why you shouldn't.

The good news: I'm not dead yet, so there's still hope.

And now, back to the music.



 
Been to P.A. dozen times or so my way to and from the Antarctic. Great town, although a little chilly at times. My favorite memory is an orange colored restaurant that serves an amazing Chilean favorite called Chupa de Centolla. Their Conger Eel was pretty good as well.  Never made it to Ushuaia either, too much to see in this world.
Great soundtrack from a great movie! 
"Motorcycle Diaries"
 TerryS wrote:

Having been to Punta Arenas, but not Ushuaia, every day I feel like that. Instead, I piddle around on the bike in the hundreds of clicks instead of the 10  thousand that would be needed.

Moral: do it while you can, before you think of all the reasons why you shouldn't.

The good news: I'm not dead yet, so there's still hope.

And now, back to the music.



 
Well said my friend, well said.  "...before you think of all the reasons you shouldn't..."

That probably explains why all my epic motorcycle trips were taken when I was young and had minimal adult responsibilities. 

 




 
Zamfir called... 
Never grow tired of listening to this. Reminds me to go watch the film again. Both very enjoyable experiences. Thanks again, Bill
 buddy wrote:
Brilliant music and a wonderful movie.

 




Indeed!
 juanos wrote:
sometimes, like today, I just feel like getting on a bike and touring to the end of the world... and back...

 
Having been to Punta Arenas, but not Ushuaia, every day I feel like that. Instead, I piddle around on the bike in the hundreds of clicks instead of the 10  thousand that would be needed.

Moral: do it while you can, before you think of all the reasons why you shouldn't.

The good news: I'm not dead yet, so there's still hope.

And now, back to the music.


 kojiroh wrote:
This is so amazing. It's not meant to be listened repeatedly though.

 
I'm not sure if any songs are meant to be listened to repeatedly.
sometimes, like today, I just feel like getting on a bike and touring to the end of the world... and back...
fine
Brilliant music and a wonderful movie.
like this Much better than the Moody Blues :-)
This is so amazing. It's not meant to be listened repeatedly though.
Perfect music and perfect movie.
From a self confessed Heavy Rock fan this is one amazing piece of music. First caught it in the amazing movie and then bought the cd...........just what the doctor orders when you need to seriously Chill. Thanks for playing.
 
I enjoyed the movie.  Do see it. {#Motor}
After a long hard day at WURK; this is just the ticket. Thank you Bill. (it blends well with the midnight thunderstorm that's happening right now...)
Listen twice, buy once.
 
This man is a genius.
This number was played on, of all places, BBC Radio 3 (classical music station) last week, and it was mentioned that it refers to the town/city of Ushuaia, which is way down at the southernmost tip of Argentina by Tierra del Fuego - next stop Antarctica. Which I thought was interesting :o)
This music is a lovely way to begin a course of prednisone, if that's possible{#Skull}
 vivakitty wrote:
The flute in this song makes me hitty.
 
As in kitty hitty?
discovered this beautiful song on RP . . . now a proud owner.
 suesblues wrote:
I love this radio station, you never fail to transport me while I am tinkering away at various projects, songs and segues just pop up that work really well!  Like now....{#Motor}
 
Exactly how I feel. Wonderful song.
I love this radio station, you never fail to transport me while I am tinkering away at various projects, songs and segues just pop up that work really well!  Like now....{#Motor}
sublime
Gustavo is amazing.  He's done get soundtrack work (Babel, Brokeback Mountain, etc), which led me to his other work.  He's been on my favorite list for awhile now.  Worth diving into deeper if this is your kind of thing.

Such an awesome song...10+


 vivakitty wrote:
The flute in this song makes me hitty.
 
And this is a good thing? Never heard of "hitty."  {#Ask}
Stop everything. Listen...eyes closed...simply godlike. I love it.
goosebumps :-) love it!!
Pleasant surprise to hear this coming out of my speakers...
Hello RP-Listeners!

I wish all of you "MERRY CHRISTMAS",
wherever you are - whoever you wanna be!

Christmas is a sweet-naive tradition -
not a religious event! 

I like it anyway!

Still - I hope Bill takes the chance
to rock the christmas-tree to pieces tonight!

"Happy Christmas
your "BAD SANTA",
aka STINGRAY
-from Cologne/Germany-
PS
Sermon of the day (promise: I'm serious):

The "Three Wise Men" - Melchior, Balthasar + Caspar
are buried in a golden sarcophage in"our" dome, the famous 
"Cologne dome" - the third highest church-building
in the world - right in the very centre of town, next to the Rhine.
A gothic building of extra-class!

Have a look:
https://de.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Datei:Koelner_Dom_bei_Nacht_1_RB.JPG&filetimestamp=20060517174554

The "grave" for the non-believers:
https://www.koelner-dom.de/17450.html?&L=1

+

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shrine_of_the_Three_Kings


Yes, it's him.

 
californiaview wrote:
I believe so

 
twitterpated wrote:
Isn't this the same awesome artist who does that piece from the Babel soundtrack?
 
 


The flute in this song makes me hitty.
 twitterpated wrote:
Isn't this the same awesome artist who does that piece from the Babel soundtrack?
 
Yes, it is, good ear...

https://www.radioparadise.com/content.php?name=Music&func=search&type=artist&search=Gustavo+Santaolalla


 ncollingridge wrote:

The problem is that extreme capitalism is just as corrupt as extreme communism. Look at where we are today in the capitalist west - big corporations don't care at all about society, and libertarians only care about themselves. It's just the same (in reverse) as a communist state where everything is done in the name of society, no-one has any freedom and making money is considered to be evil.

I get so frustrated that people can't see the irony in the battle between left-wing and right-wing politics - they're both just as screwed up. The only way to a happy society (and hence to happy people) is for all of us to see that the right balance is, as always, somewhere in the middle, ie where the health of society is seen as important but concern for this doesn't dominate people's freedom. You have to be prepared to sacrifice some freedoms for its health, but it all has to be within bounds.

Follow Ayn Rand and all hope is lost, just as much as if you follow Marx!

Oh, and it really doesn't help anyone to drag us back to WWI and before - all countries and governments have things they should be ashamed of, but we really need to focus on the present right now...
 

Reasonable arguments will get you nowhere, I hope you understand.
I believe so

 
twitterpated wrote:
Isn't this the same awesome artist who does that piece from the Babel soundtrack?
 


A wonderful soundscape. I like it.
Isn't this the same awesome artist who does that piece from the Babel soundtrack?

 Bleyfusz wrote:

So is the movie. (And you don't have to be a supporter of the Cuban Revolution in order to like it.)

 
{#Roflol} LOL — the movie is great too!


Cant wait for my Grand Tour of South America; the Andes, the Amazon, Rio, Buenos Aires, the Pampas, Patagonia mountains, Iguazu Falls, Galapagos................................................................

 twitterpated wrote:
I don't believe I've heard this song before.  It is very pretty.
 
So is the movie. (And you don't have to be a supporter of the Cuban Revolution in order to like it.)

I don't believe I've heard this song before.  It is very pretty.
 ncollingridge wrote:


I get so frustrated that people can't see the irony in the battle between left-wing and right-wing politics - they're both just as screwed up.  


I do and I am sure I am not the only one - vision in politics is lacking, but more than that we are stuck in bad habits. I'm confident, we'll adapt and eventually change.
Imperialism? Well, (cough) ladies and gentlemen, this began a long way before there were Americans or Brits, even before Romans or Greeks, or Chinese, like may be 200 000 years ago, around the time the first Homo Sapiens began to spread. Did you read this book by Lewis Evolution Man: Or, How I Ate My Father ? A fight between left and right in the prehistorical times. Hilarious.

As for this song, very nice indeed...
 daigoro wrote:

Ha! A Brit lecturing America about meddling in Iraq?

How about the British Mandate of Mesopotamia after WWI?

How about the Anglo-Iraqi War? Talk about a war for oil!

You guys practically DEFINED imperialism! Don't act like your shite don't stink.

 
I'm not lecturing anybody, mate, and don't make assumptions about my ethnic background. As for imperialism, every Western country has been at it, including little Italy. The 'trailblazer' was, of course, the Brit Empire, but that itself had taken lessons from the Spanish (hence Cuba being Spanish-speaking) and Portuguese. Then we had the Germans, French, Belgians, and the rest, then Uncle Sam, which prior to WWII only practiced imperialism in Central and Latin America, got stuck in after all the European empires were shagged by the war.

So you're aiming at a straw man. Oh, and who are "you guys"? Don't go blaming me for Brit imperialism. That's as irrational as slagging off all Yanks for US imperialism.


 daigoro wrote:

Ha! A Brit lecturing America about meddling in Iraq?

How about the British Mandate of Mesopotamia after WWI?

How about the Anglo-Iraqi War? Talk about a war for oil!

You guys practically DEFINED imperialism! Don't act like your shite don't stink.

Cuba sucks on its own. It doesn't need any help at sucking. Communism always sucks. Such wonderful leaders too like Stalin, Mao, Pol Pot, etc.

Which countries are prospering the most in South America right now? Brazil and Chile. Capitalist countries.

Which countries are going down the crapper? Venezuela comes to mind. Once the most prosperous country in all of Latin America. Now Hugo is grabbing with both hands, shutting down free press and radio, and voting himself dictator for life.

Oh by the way, was that line about Cuba not having death squads and not making dissents disappear supposed to be a joke?
 
The problem is that extreme capitalism is just as corrupt as extreme communism. Look at where we are today in the capitalist west - big corporations don't care at all about society, and libertarians only care about themselves. It's just the same (in reverse) as a communist state where everything is done in the name of society, no-one has any freedom and making money is considered to be evil.

I get so frustrated that people can't see the irony in the battle between left-wing and right-wing politics - they're both just as screwed up. The only way to a happy society (and hence to happy people) is for all of us to see that the right balance is, as always, somewhere in the middle, ie where the health of society is seen as important but concern for this doesn't dominate people's freedom. You have to be prepared to sacrifice some freedoms for its health, but it all has to be within bounds.

Follow Ayn Rand and all hope is lost, just as much as if you follow Marx!

Oh, and it really doesn't help anyone to drag us back to WWI and before - all countries and governments have things they should be ashamed of, but we really need to focus on the present right now...
Bliss {#Sunny}
 daigoro wrote:
. . . You guys practically DEFINED imperialism! Don't act like your shite don't stink. . . .
 
{#Lol} I agreed with much of fredriley's post, but this line made me laugh.

 Nadine wrote:
i need to buy his records...

 

This particular track is on his album "Ronroco"... along with a bunch of other wonderful stuff.
aplausos ..for a mastermind! beautiful song and mood.
this is an awesome song :) i love this Radio!!!

This is sublime. Oh, and you guys calling each other imperialists...you both are. So, chill, okay?
 fredriley wrote:
It's not a patch on many other regimes, most of which are supported by the US of A. The only reason that Cuba gets Uncle Sam's goat and is labelled as one of the "most repressive" regimes is that it's been sticking it to the US in its own imperial backyard. There's plenty wrong with Cuban Communism and I can't be doing with the regime's authoritarianism (which oppresses those to the Left of it, such as anarchists and libertarian Marxists, and damages the regime in the long run), but in terms of political repression it's a long way behind US client states in Latin America and beyond. Including, once upon a time, Saddam's Iraq... Political dissenters may be harassed and locked up in Cuba, but they're not murdered by death squads or 'disappeared'. Nice number, this. 7 from the Nottingham jury.
 
Ha! A Brit lecturing America about meddling in Iraq?

How about the British Mandate of Mesopotamia after WWI?

How about the Anglo-Iraqi War? Talk about a war for oil!

You guys practically DEFINED imperialism! Don't act like your shite don't stink.

Cuba sucks on its own. It doesn't need any help at sucking. Communism always sucks. Such wonderful leaders too like Stalin, Mao, Pol Pot, etc.

Which countries are prospering the most in South America right now? Brazil and Chile. Capitalist countries.

Which countries are going down the crapper? Venezuela comes to mind. Once the most prosperous country in all of Latin America. Now Hugo is grabbing with both hands, shutting down free press and radio, and voting himself dictator for life.

Oh by the way, was that line about Cuba not having death squads and not making dissents disappear supposed to be a joke?

another new artist for me....{#Notworthy}
You guys just amaze me....
i need to buy his records...

 Otomi wrote:

You hit it right on the head, Fred.
  

Now there's a ringing endorsement.  {#Lol}  We may as well get the generalissimo's take on the matter. 
Gooooooooo Bill!
 fredriley wrote:
It's not a patch on many other regimes, most of which are supported by the US of A. The only reason that Cuba gets Uncle Sam's goat and is labelled as one of the "most repressive" regimes is that it's been sticking it to the US in its own imperial backyard. There's plenty wrong with Cuban Communism and I can't be doing with the regime's authoritarianism (which oppresses those to the Left of it, such as anarchists and libertarian Marxists, and damages the regime in the long run), but in terms of political repression it's a long way behind US client states in Latin America and beyond. Including, once upon a time, Saddam's Iraq... Political dissenters may be harassed and locked up in Cuba, but they're not murdered by death squads or 'disappeared'.

Nice number, this. 7 from the Nottingham jury.
 
You hit it right on the head, Fred.
 fredriley wrote:


It's not a patch on many other regimes, most of which are supported by the US of A. The only reason that Cuba gets Uncle Sam's goat and is labelled as one of the "most repressive" regimes is that it's been sticking it to the US in its own imperial backyard. There's plenty wrong with Cuban Communism and I can't be doing with the regime's authoritarianism (which oppresses those to the Left of it, such as anarchists and libertarian Marxists, and damages the regime in the long run), but in terms of political repression it's a long way behind US client states in Latin America and beyond. Including, once upon a time, Saddam's Iraq... Political dissenters may be harassed and locked up in Cuba, but they're not murdered by death squads or 'disappeared'.

Nice number, this. 7 from the Nottingham jury.
  

Fred, The only goat that Castro gets nowadays is that of the Florida Cuban voting block who are against the Castro regime, they are not against the Cuban people.  The vast majority of Americans want more open relations with Cuba.  It is no longer Cold War politics that dictates the embargo.  Florida's electoral votes are too important for a presidential candidate to write off, and it is always a hotly contested state.  A pro-Cuba position is still politcal suicide.
This song puts me right on a mountain side enjoying nature...I love it! {#Daisy}

The job of eliminating humans is not an easy one... someone has to do it. It's not for the faint hearted you know! Now, hat's off everyone to a poor man who was butchered by a repressive military for only doing his job.{#Curtain}


Beautiful song...

Regarding Che the revolutionary: Readers of history know well that revolutions that succeed usually do so at the muzzle of a gun.  Cuba is not unique in this regard.  "Peaceful" revolutions are extremely rare.  (The collapse of communism in Eastern Europe was very special in this regard...with the exception of Yugoslavia..., even if it was punctuated with occasional "score-settling.")  Democratic revolutions are almost non-existent, because democracy requires patient institution-building and management instead of the usual post-revolution "exciting" political repression and civil war.  The American Revolution is special in this regard (even tho' violence, civil war and repression did happen here too, but in the end, a stable state was formed). It was more-or-less guided by Enlightenment intellectuals with a constructive vision of how a state should be run and who built a solid foundation for that which was to come after the revolution.  This is what modern revolutionaries often forget...how a state should be built that benefits its citizens as a whole and not just to satisfy some rigid political/religious ideology.


 SuperWeh wrote:
Although the movie was nice, (funny and lots of pretty pictures etc.) it portrays a rather idealized version of Che. I've read the original motorcycle diaries the movie was based on and found and was struck by the obvious lack of any "noble revolutionary" ideas. For example in the book the whole episode in the leper colony didn't seem to inspire any feelings of comradery like the movie suggests. (let alone that he took off his gloves) There are more examples like this.
 
The movie script was constructed from Alberto Granado's memoirs as well. Isn't it possible that Che neglected to brag about all his own actions (the messianic acts of crossing the river despite his health and refusing the gloves at the leper colony) or, to be more cynical about it, saw no need to prop himself up that far as he hadn't intended for the book to be widely published, and that these details were supplied by Granado from either his own memoirs or during consultation for the film? And naturally, for the sake of the movie, Che would be idealized somewhat. It's not a documentary, even if the source material is real.

Also, I haven't read the book but I've read selected quotes that certainly do strongly suggest a "noble revolutionary" in the works. Maybe you just didn't find enough examples of this to satisfy your sense of continuity between the book and film? Or they were expressed in more poetic terms than his political tracts later in life? I dunno, just asking.

I don't believe Che's a saint — in fact what I find so compelling about his story is that he should start on a path that led him to saint-like behaviour and awareness of suffering only to turn to the gun in the end. (I'm also kind of skeptical about sons of priviledge positioning themselves as great leader of the impoverished.) I've read parts of a collection of speeches/essays/letters that he wrote and he sounds like a most reasonable, compassionate man of the people. Yet, he was ruthless in his mission and (as noted down the page) had his own cruelly expedient sense of 'justice.'  Interesting contradictions in a person both so reviled and revered by people who know even less about him than I do.

 dmeltdown wrote:
Beautiful song.. I would love to visit Argentina someday.

I like how it matches the long trips on the plains. You're very welcome to visit and experience it.

Argentine pampa (plain) showing the flat horizon.

Beautiful song.. I would love to visit Argentina someday.
garthwb wrote:
Grammy winner, this guy, 2 years running, for Brokeback Mountain and Babel... Besides numerous other wins and nominations. Superb at scoring soundtracks.
He did a couple tracks on The Insider soundtrack, too (along with Lisa Gerrard / Peter Bourke, Jan Garbarek, Graeme Revell).
Baby_M wrote:
You might also consider the fact that the Cuban regime Che worked so hard to put in power remains one of the most repressive in the world.
It's not a patch on many other regimes, most of which are supported by the US of A. The only reason that Cuba gets Uncle Sam's goat and is labelled as one of the "most repressive" regimes is that it's been sticking it to the US in its own imperial backyard. There's plenty wrong with Cuban Communism and I can't be doing with the regime's authoritarianism (which oppresses those to the Left of it, such as anarchists and libertarian Marxists, and damages the regime in the long run), but in terms of political repression it's a long way behind US client states in Latin America and beyond. Including, once upon a time, Saddam's Iraq... Political dissenters may be harassed and locked up in Cuba, but they're not murdered by death squads or 'disappeared'. Nice number, this. 7 from the Nottingham jury.
The word outstanding was invented for music like this.
riffster wrote:
Repression has many colors - if you watched 'The Motorcycle Diaries' the movie gives a hint of the grave injustices done to the poor, mostly indigenous, peoples of South America. I was born (of some privilege) in Bolivia and my civil engineer (at the time) father was very familiar with the regions of Bolivia in which Che fought and died. I have Indian blood (Aymara) in me, but am considered white due to the preponderance of European ancestry in my genes. Those who were not fortunate enough to be considered one of the privileged usually were condemned to lives in miserable circumstances - back-breaking work in the tin mines or subsistence farming of potatoes and other crops on the Altiplano. RP not political? Yeah right - life isn't at all political, eh? To the 'Guzanos' (anti-Castro Cubans for those who don't know) out there who bleat on about the cruelty of Castro Regime I keep thinking of all the rest of us Latins whom regard you Guzanos with less than kind concern for being part of The Problem, and not *at all* part of a solution. Che Guevara wasn't a hero to me, but he was a sign of the terrible injustice that was (and still is) prevalent throughout a region that still remains amongst the poorest in the world. I do have to grant that Che tried to do something for the poor, instead of starving and oppressing an entire country because they had the audacity to throw out Batista, the Mafia and the other corrupt bastards that typified pre-Castro Cuba. Btw, nice music! (And may Cubans see a better day without Castro but mostly without Guzanos amongst them to make their lives he11.) - Riff
Hey riffster. It was after watchin a TV documentry on children working in the Bolivian tin mines, that my wife and I joined a foster-parents organisation working with children in poor communities in Bolivia. Though we are very much a lower working class family, and have four children of our own, we have maintained our committment for near on 25 years. So maybe not all us blue eyed devils are interested in oppressing others, eh? Btw, nice music! Yeah, right there pal.
Grammy winner, this guy, 2 years running, for Brokeback Mountain and Babel... Besides numerous other wins and nominations. Superb at scoring soundtracks.
Aaahhhh fantastic... Didn't know him. Bought CD, no way :-)
outstanding
excellent sound:mystic, foreign, exotic . . .I wanna go there . . .
Awesome stuff, just a quick one about Cuba, beautiful country and lovely people with great attitude toward life as their country's been struggling under US embargo for more than 40 years(1962).....Repression-Oppression.....
OMG............MUST HAVE! Thank you PR, This is SO awesome
Was sittin' here workin' away when this came on...and I'm thinkin'...that sure sounds like the music from The Motorcycle Diaries...Daaa!
Repression has many colors - if you watched 'The Motorcycle Diaries' the movie gives a hint of the grave injustices done to the poor, mostly indigenous, peoples of South America. I was born (of some privilege) in Bolivia and my civil engineer (at the time) father was very familiar with the regions of Bolivia in which Che fought and died. I have Indian blood (Aymara) in me, but am considered white due to the preponderance of European ancestry in my genes. Those who were not fortunate enough to be considered one of the privileged usually were condemned to lives in miserable circumstances - back-breaking work in the tin mines or subsistence farming of potatoes and other crops on the Altiplano. RP not political? Yeah right - life isn't at all political, eh? To the 'Guzanos' (anti-Castro Cubans for those who don't know) out there who bleat on about the cruelty of Castro Regime I keep thinking of all the rest of us Latins whom regard you Guzanos with less than kind concern for being part of The Problem, and not *at all* part of a solution. Che Guevara wasn't a hero to me, but he was a sign of the terrible injustice that was (and still is) prevalent throughout a region that still remains amongst the poorest in the world. I do have to grant that Che tried to do something for the poor, instead of starving and oppressing an entire country because they had the audacity to throw out Batista, the Mafia and the other corrupt bastards that typified pre-Castro Cuba. Btw, nice music! (And may Cubans see a better day without Castro but mostly without Guzanos amongst them to make their lives he11.) - Riff Baby_M wrote:
One of my professors in law school was a lawyer in Cuba and had the thankless task of defending some of these poor souls, most of whom were on trial for the "crime" of being on the losing side of a civil conflict. The procedure was to issue an indictment, hold the trial (which always found the defendant "guilty") and the sentencing (always "death") in the space of an hour or so, move next door to the court of appeals for a ten- or fifteen-minute hearing which always affirmed the lower court judgment, and then haul the poor guy out a side door to meet the firing squad. You might also consider the fact that the Cuban regime Che worked so hard to put in power remains one of the most repressive in the world.
Great movie, great soundtrack.
This. Is. Fabulous.
JICAMARCA wrote:
Viva El Che Guevara!!! The South American Robin Hood!! Mass murderer? and I supposed Jesus Christ was a terrorist..
Are you trolling? Great playing. Love his work. Someday I want to make a charango.
Magical!
Good God people.... this is about stunning music, politics is not on RP's agenda... I think... Is it, Bill?
ClaireWild wrote:
..can ye point me to some evidence of what ye are saying re mass murderer?
From Wikipedia:
He <(meaning Che)> was appointed commander of the La Cabaña Fortress prison, and during his five-month tenure in that post (January 2 through June 12, 1959), he oversaw the trial and execution of many people, among whom were former Batista regime officials and members of the "Bureau for the Repression of Communist Activities" (a unit of the secret police known by its Spanish acronym BRAC). José Vilasuso, an attorney who worked under Guevara at La Cabaña preparing indictments, said that these were lawless proceedings where "the facts were judged without any consideration to general juridical principles" and the findings were pre-determined by Guevara. It is estimated that between 156 and 550 people were executed on Guevara's extra-judicial orders during this time.
One of my professors in law school was a lawyer in Cuba and had the thankless task of defending some of these poor souls, most of whom were on trial for the "crime" of being on the losing side of a civil conflict. The procedure was to issue an indictment, hold the trial (which always found the defendant "guilty") and the sentencing (always "death") in the space of an hour or so, move next door to the court of appeals for a ten- or fifteen-minute hearing which always affirmed the lower court judgment, and then haul the poor guy out a side door to meet the firing squad. You might also consider the fact that the Cuban regime Che worked so hard to put in power remains one of the most repressive in the world.
ClaireWild wrote:
Err....well fantastic lovely music. I too saw the film and enjoyed. I realise this is taken from a film based story, but have I missed some history..can ye point me to some evidence of what ye are saying re mass murderer?
Che Guavara was the head of the secret police in Cuba. He got to that position by fervent dedication to the communist cause to the point he was willing to execute his own soldiers--when others such as Castro were hesitant to do so--during the Cuban revolution against Batista. Mass murderer might be a bit of a harsh indictment, but they he definitely developed a comfort level with blood shed, that I found disturbing, when I read a portion of the biography of him entitled, Che.
jpfueler wrote:
Nice Too bad it is from a movie trying to paint a pleasant picture of a mass murderer.
OBVIOUSLY THIS PERSON ONLY LISTENS TO ONE SIDE OF HISTORY AND APPARENTLY DOES NOT READ!
jpfueler wrote:
Nice Too bad it is from a movie trying to paint a pleasant picture of a mass murderer.
Err....well fantastic lovely music. I too saw the film and enjoyed. I realise this is taken from a film based story, but have I missed some history..can ye point me to some evidence of what ye are saying re mass murderer?
jpfueler wrote:
Nice Too bad it is from a movie trying to paint a pleasant picture of a mass murderer.
Uh? Eclaire ma lanterne buddy, what do you mean? I have his biography upstairs, but haven't found time to read it yet. I read The Motorcycle Diaries though, and some other stuff, and wasn't under the impression this guy would turn into a mass murderer.
Nice Too bad it is from a movie trying to paint a pleasant picture of a mass murderer.
dolfan wrote:
"Going to California"?
The Battle of Evermore?
ahhhh....those peaceful and harmonic flutes in the background...
ahoylola wrote:
there should be a rating of "super nova". that's how i'd rate this piece.
I agree. This is definitely an 11.
David_Price wrote:
I just rented this movie last weekend, loved it...and kept it on the menu page of the dvd for a while because this song was playing...it's lovely.
Yup, best Menu music I've heard lately !
I just rented this movie last weekend, loved it...and kept it on the menu page of the dvd for a while because this song was playing...it's lovely.
Mari wrote:
Check out the movie too, it's well worth it for cinematography, history in the makin' and of course, the music
I saw the movie, very nice, I love it
siandbeth wrote:
What Led Zepplin song does this share an intro with? Not that there's anything wrong with that.
"Going to California"?
What Led Zepplin song does this share an intro with? Not that there's anything wrong with that.
QueenLucia wrote:
Beautiful. I'd never heard this before.
Check out the movie too, it's well worth it for cinematography, history in the makin' and of course, the music
Really relaxing music, great for writing a research paper to!
Wow....this is so beautiful.
Aguante Argentina Loco!