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Nick Drake — Three Hours
Album: Five Leaves Left
Avg rating:
7.8

Your rating:
Total ratings: 3031









Released: 1969
Length: 6:08
Plays (last 30 days): 4
Three hours from sundown
Jeremy flies
Hoping to keep
The sun from his eyes
East from the city
And down to the cave
In search of a master
In search of a slave

Three hours from London
Jacomo's free
Taking his woes
Down to the sea
In search of a lifetime
To tell when he's home
In search of a story
That's never been known

Three hours from speaking
Everyone's flown
Not wanting to be
Seen on their own
Three hours is needed
To leave from them all
Three hours to wonder
And three hours to fall

Three hours from sundown
Jeremy flies
Hoping to keep
The sun from his eyes
East from the city
And down to the cave
In search for a master
In search for a slave
Comments (192)add comment
 Proclivities wrote: .

Good thoughts.  I imagine that most of the "folk" musicians of that era (Bert Jansch, John Renbourn, John Martyn, Richard Thompson, etc.) must've often felt as if they were in a very small circle.  Given that Drake is reputed to have been withdrawn and depressed, his circle may have seemed even smaller.  As you said, artists often don't make art for it to be seen or heard, they often produce it because they feel compelled to do so.

Drake and John Martyn were close friends.
Such a beautiful voice and talent at such a young age
Thanks for playing this RP!
R.I.P.
My favourite Nick Drake song. It and I are exact contemporaries.
 paulmcnett wrote:

We are so fortunate that he struggled with his depression to give us his 3 albums. He was ahead of his time and almost forgotten. I'm happy VW popularized him. Like fine wine, the soul of his music ages well. We are so fortunate.


Very true.  …and it is still SO heart wrenching that he could find no solace in his brilliant creations.
Nick Drake and the holidays are like re-creating one's dark and deep twenties. Be very careful if you choose to go there. 
Thanks again William. And to lizardking for his remark accompanying my earlier post. 
 ednazarko wrote:

Argh, this is making me crazy... reminding me of a song that I can't put my finger on.

AH - just got it. Al Stewart, Roads to Moscow. When this first started, the lyrics from Roads to Moscow popped into my head.

They were contemporaries of the burgeoning folk rock scene of the time.

This man connected the world and the other world/s… genius and sadly gone too soon.
 chinaski wrote:

Once had a Yamaha 5 CD carousel player. Loaded it with Drakes 5 CD box set collection when it first came out and listened to nothing else at home for five straight months from November 2001 to March 2002. The lyrics, the finger style guitar, just wow. Wouldn't recommend it though. The depression aspect was very real for me. Beautiful just the same.


Nov-Mar is the time of year in the Pacific NW (Seattle area) that depresses me to tears, though oddly, listening to the 5 discs of Nick's music nonstop during those dark months might be a good thing for folks like me, stepping into the depression instead of trying to fight it.  

Oddly, Spring 2022 has been slow to develop, we normally joke "April showers bring May showers" and this year we can add "bring June showers" - as if the weather is as disgruntled as the populace in these crazy times.  

All the same, Long Live RP and Nick Drake's evocative, emotional, exceptional music!  Heck, +1 to 10 on this one today too.  
 IndyDoug wrote:
Reminds me of Bert Jansch's Blackwater Side. The 60s were a time of folk revival in the UK.


similar open tuning. both exceptional guitarists.
Great to hear this, one of the most under played artists. He was a genius like so many gone too soon.
Setting aside Miles Davis, this may be one of the most evocative jazz blues songs ever. It's as if you can hear his Burmese childhood in it too, so there's that. Guess it's really "world music." Or the greatest of worldly music. 
So much 10 from this man. *sigh*
 sfyi2001 wrote:






"cognoscenti?"
Tuned in and all rolled up to this great song✌️
   Gorgeous.   
 Highlowsel wrote:

You have to consider this, to juxtapose it, against when it was released.  1969.  Think about that.  Think about being someone making this kind of music in the face of that which was anointed as popular by the days cognoscenti.  Being obscured by all the currents of days like those. 

Hell the 'Net was just some Darpa (Defense department) step-child in those days.  A small province played in by a subset of college techno-geeks who didn't have a clue the portent of that which they were doing.  There certainly wasn't all the various YouTube styled venues by which you could put yourself out there.  Maybe there was the Midnight Special....but it catered to that which was promotionally popular and not gypsie vagabound stuff. 

To a certain extent this guy must have felt like he was singing, and playing, into a vacuum.  Or at best a very small circle of like minded others.  It's kind'a sad when you think about how he missed out on being able to ride the wave of enthusiasm that grew up around that which he put out there. 

But I suppose it comes to this with all artistic expression.  You're not doing it, necessarily, for self-serving reasons.  No.  You do it because it feels good.  You do it because you can't envision not doing it.  You do it because something tells you that you have no choice.  What you produce is more like your children.  You create them; you set them free, and can only hope that the energy you put into producing them will radiate out positively in time, regardless of you being there to witness it, or not. 

Just some thoughts. 

Highlow
American Net'Zen




Goddess that voice; that atmosphere. Nick Drake is not "music to kill yourself by." It's a freakin' time machine. 
Yes. I wish more would have the breadth of knowledge about what these artists created that laid the path for much of the music that sometimes is coped from the past.
Music should never be only about one's era.
 LizK wrote:

Roads to Moscow, story few westerners know, speaks volumes about Stalin.
Try reading One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovitch...
Tony in NJ
W.A.S.T.E.


1969, Amazing. I didn't discover ND and John Martyn until the mid 80's.
My loss.
Hey

In search of a master
In search of a slave

http://nickdrake.com/three_hou...
Once had a Yamaha 5 CD carousel player. Loaded it with Drakes 5 CD box set collection when it first came out and listened to nothing else at home for five straight months from November 2001 to March 2002. The lyrics, the finger style guitar, just wow. Wouldn't recommend it though. The depression aspect was very real for me. Beautiful just the same.
Just a God and his guitar.......
 LeGiff wrote:
I like his stuff but I find I'm hearing more of him than I'd like on RP. Just gets a little too much. At least it's not the cello song... again!
 

Total Ratings: 1930 Average: 7.9

Plays (last 30 days):
Main Mix - 3
Mellow Mix - 6

The numbers tell the story - Mellow Mix 30/6 = once every 5 days for this song

Perhaps RP is not really for you

I thought he was Jose Gonzalez! Much resemblance.
 yofitofu wrote:
This guy is one of the great timeless geniuses of modern music. So much influence on so many.
 

I thought this was a modern song, I can't believe it was recorded in 1969, it doesn't sound like anything else of the time. 
A Van Gogh of the music world, hardly appreciated in his lifetime but now revered as a timeless giant in his field, a life cut short by suicide or misadventure after struggling with one too many bouts of seriously bad mental health
We are so fortunate that he struggled with his depression to give us his 3 albums. He was ahead of his time and almost forgotten. I'm happy VW popularized him. Like fine wine, the soul of his music ages well. We are so fortunate.
This guy is one of the great timeless geniuses of modern music. So much influence on so many.
I never was a big fan of Nick Drake - too depressing and I don't always like his voice.
This song hits a spot though!
I'll try this album, I may like it more than Pink Moon, which is the one that's played everywhere and every time!
When a musician is also a poet.
 ednazarko wrote:
Al Stewart, Roads to Moscow. When this first started, the lyrics from Roads to Moscow popped into my head.
 
Roads to Moscow, story few westerners know, speaks volumes about Stalin.
 rocklandlove wrote:
A song that never fails to make the hair on the back of my neck stand up. Haunting, propulsive, mysterious, and deeply melancholic. A few broad lines that hint at a dark novel.

And then there's this: Consider that this song is HALF A CENTURY OLD. And yet, it feels as fresh as if it were recorded yesterday.

Music that stands the test of time is rare. So very rare. 
 

Wait 'till rocklandlove gets a'hold of a bodice-ripper novel from, say, 1847. LMAO!  
I really do wish, well not really because that's just disappointment coming to do wishing well stuff, but do regret I suppose not taking Nick Drake more seriously... then. But as I was more dance hall-oriented in the 80s it was considered bad form to put on something like Nick Drake at a party. Too downer stuff for a party, of course. So it was private listening stuff only, and I never had anything remotely like bandwidth for Nick Drake in the 80s. But hey, look on the sunny side, always. Sure glad I do now. This is one of the most exquisite songs since like a Kate Bush one about England moors and fairies and sprites and all that kinda ancient Brit Lit stuff we all do surely enjoy. A lot. 
 Proclivities wrote:

Good thoughts.  I imagine that most of the "folk" musicians of that era (Bert Jansch, John Renbourn, John Martyn, Richard Thompson, etc.) must've often felt as if they were in a very small circle.  Given that Drake is reputed to have been withdrawn and depressed, his circle may have seemed even smaller.  As you said, artists often don't make art for it to be seen or heard, they often produce it because they feel compelled to do so.
 
I think it is different looking at it from a British vs. US perspective. The British folk-rock scene was quite different in digging deeper into traditional music and incorporating more jazz elements (at least until Joni Mitchell's later years). Much more avant garde, and had quite a large following. Pentangle, for example, did a lot of TV appearances.
Wow, 50 year old song, just like me. 
Argh, this is making me crazy... reminding me of a song that I can't put my finger on.

AH - just got it. Al Stewart, Roads to Moscow. When this first started, the lyrics from Roads to Moscow popped into my head.
Wondering how i missed Nick Drake as well, however find this record brilliant from all aspects of music...
A song that never fails to make the hair on the back of my neck stand up. Haunting, propulsive, mysterious, and deeply melancholic. A few broad lines that hint at a dark novel.

And then there's this: Consider that this song is HALF A CENTURY OLD. And yet, it feels as fresh as if it were recorded yesterday.

Music that stands the test of time is rare. So very rare. 
Thank you, Nick!!
If interested in Nick Drake, may I suggest the documentary "A Skin Too Few". It's on You tube, and it's brilliant.
 Highlowsel wrote:
You have to consider this, to juxtapose it, against when it was released.  1969.  Think about that.  Think about being someone making this kind of music in the face of that which was anointed as popular by the days cognoscenti.  Being obscured by all the currents of days like those. 

Hell the 'Net was just some Darpa (Defense department) step-child in those days.  A small province played in by a subset of college techno-geeks who didn't have a clue the portent of that which they were doing.  There certainly wasn't all the various YouTube styled venues by which you could put yourself out there.  Maybe there was the Midnight Special....but it catered to that which was promotionally popular and not gypsie vagabound stuff. 

To a certain extent this guy must have felt like he was singing, and playing, into a vacuum.  Or at best a very small circle of like minded others.  It's kind'a sad when you think about how he missed out on being able to ride the wave of enthusiasm that grew up around that which he put out there. 

But I suppose it comes to this with all artistic expression.  You're not doing it, necessarily, for self-serving reasons.  No.  You do it because it feels good.  You do it because you can't envision not doing it.  You do it because something tells you that you have no choice.  What you produce is more like your children.  You create them; you set them free, and can only hope that the energy you put into producing them will radiate out positively in time, regardless of you being there to witness it, or not. 

Just some thoughts. 

Highlow
American Net'Zen
 
Being a parent, I appreciate your "raising children" comment much, HighLowsel. Nick Drake's are doing good work/art, here in their future. 
1969? How in the world did I miss Nick Drake for decades? Until RP came along, of course. Because I was too caught up in Me Everything! for the most part. I had a dear friend who would often speak of Nick Drake as an artist. Can't recall her playing Nick Drake though. I'll blame her! This song buries itself up under the skin and stays there. Maybe it's best it wasn't so... all these decades. A little too much high-restless-goth for a gal like me to have handled well... in one's 20s. Now though? Perfect. 
I like his stuff but I find I'm hearing more of him than I'd like on RP. Just gets a little too much. At least it's not the cello song... again!
Brilliant.
One of my fave ND tunes.
Nick, though you're gone...I'd like to thank you for your music and thoughts. RIP
He's puffin a splif.........great voice....
Great stuff, straight from the soul. Thanks Nick. RIP!
 Highlowsel wrote:
You have to consider this, to juxtapose it, against when it was released.  1969.  Think about that.  Think about being someone making this kind of music in the face of that which was anointed as popular by the days cognoscenti. ...To a certain extent this guy must have felt like he was singing, and playing, into a vacuum.  Or at best a very small circle of like minded others...
But I suppose it comes to this with all artistic expression.  You're not doing it, necessarily, for self-serving reasons.  No.  You do it because it feels good.  You do it because you can't envision not doing it.  You do it because something tells you that you have no choice.  What you produce is more like your children.  You create them; you set them free, and can only hope that the energy you put into producing them will radiate out positively in time, regardless of you being there to witness it, or not. 

Just some thoughts. 

Highlow
American Net'Zen

 
Good thoughts.  I imagine that most of the "folk" musicians of that era (Bert Jansch, John Renbourn, John Martyn, Richard Thompson, etc.) must've often felt as if they were in a very small circle.  Given that Drake is reputed to have been withdrawn and depressed, his circle may have seemed even smaller.  As you said, artists often don't make art for it to be seen or heard, they often produce it because they feel compelled to do so.
 ecojot wrote:
They were friends. John wrote Solid Air for NIck.
 

The title of the Nicks compellation album “Way to Blue” allegedly came form a description of Nick by John Martyn when they were stable mates at Island Records.


Without a doubt, in my mind, this song is light-years ahead of its time; dig the percussive style of guitar that matches the otherworldly rhythm of the drums, its vision, its use of stereo channels, its amazing, genius structure and the artist's mastery of its orchestration...
You have to consider this, to juxtapose it, against when it was released.  1969.  Think about that.  Think about being someone making this kind of music in the face of that which was anointed as popular by the days cognoscenti.  Being obscured by all the currents of days like those. 

Hell the 'Net was just some Darpa (Defense department) step-child in those days.  A small province played in by a subset of college techno-geeks who didn't have a clue the portent of that which they were doing.  There certainly wasn't all the various YouTube styled venues by which you could put yourself out there.  Maybe there was the Midnight Special....but it catered to that which was promotionally popular and not gypsie vagabound stuff. 

To a certain extent this guy must have felt like he was singing, and playing, into a vacuum.  Or at best a very small circle of like minded others.  It's kind'a sad when you think about how he missed out on being able to ride the wave of enthusiasm that grew up around that which he put out there. 

But I suppose it comes to this with all artistic expression.  You're not doing it, necessarily, for self-serving reasons.  No.  You do it because it feels good.  You do it because you can't envision not doing it.  You do it because something tells you that you have no choice.  What you produce is more like your children.  You create them; you set them free, and can only hope that the energy you put into producing them will radiate out positively in time, regardless of you being there to witness it, or not. 

Just some thoughts. 

Highlow
American Net'Zen
 ElCamoteLoco wrote:
It's just so spooky.

 
Spooky?
I hear the forests. Well I guess they can be spooky {#Ask}
I think this must be my favourite Nick Drake song. It's just so spooky.
 sheeelaaa wrote:
I thought this was John Martyn ... 
 
They were friends. John wrote Solid Air for NIck.
That's some beautiful music!!!!
 sheeelaaa wrote:
I thought this was John Martyn ... 
 

Close but no cigar Sheeelaaa 


 Cynaera wrote:
Excellent song! {#Sunny}

 
'nuff said.
We've got to live on science alone...
I thought this was John Martyn ... 
 bobnose wrote:
Why doesn't your rating go to Eleven?

 
They just made Ten better instead.
Sir Drake
Why doesn't your rating go to Eleven?
 coolpeople_rule wrote:
Why such an early check out time?

Just out of...the Nick of time.  :( 



So much more good music left in you, and life to be lived..a lesson for us all?  

 
he suffered from a mental illness and sometimes music is the only power to keep the demons at bay.
 
Love Nick but was not always so.  Unfortunately I tuned in too late to catch this one. It will no doubt come again.   Just too late and for John Martyn who someone in the thread mentioned.  Both gone but transported by the YouTube of Martyn's Solid Air but in another world when they were making music.  
Radiohead, Nick, Eno, REM
Why such an early check out time?

Just out of...the Nick of time.  :( 



So much more good music left in you, and life to be lived..a lesson for us all?  
The best Drake song! I love the bass :-)
 
Drake and Martyn were friends (not sure if Jansch new Drake?); check out Martyn's tribute to Nick, "Solid Air":

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UikPQOaJpfU


meinthecorner wrote:
I can't believe that I never knew this man's music at all during his lifetime, not until I heard him here just recently. 
I'm getting blown away with each song I hear. Gonna be makin' my list, but I'd dearly love to hear a few more cuts from Mr. Drake's repertoire.
This particular song made me think of John Martyn, and I thought I could I could even hear a bit of Bert Jansche (Pentangle?) there as well. Does anyone else pick up on that, or am I just hearing things? Ha!

 


The emotive, percussive guitar-picking, the haunting tones of the vocals, the rhythms, the fabulous drum-beats of this thing HYPNOTIZE...
Classy cool, maybe Richie Havens next?  or Joan Armitrading, both have a beautiful similarity to this, imho
THE NEW NICK CAVE (not Drake) album is a SENSATION!!
Reminds me of Bert Jansch's Blackwater Side. The 60s were a time of folk revival in the UK.
So hard to pick just ONE, but this is my favorite Nick Drake recording.
I can't believe that I never knew this man's music at all during his lifetime, not until I heard him here just recently. 
I'm getting blown away with each song I hear. Gonna be makin' my list, but I'd dearly love to hear a few more cuts from Mr. Drake's repertoire.
This particular song made me think of John Martyn, and I thought I could I could even hear a bit of Bert Jansche (Pentangle?) there as well. Does anyone else pick up on that, or am I just hearing things? Ha!
I grew up in England in the 60's and never heard of Nick Drake.  RP is a great station. I loved this song and have bought many more  songs thanks to RP.  A radio station with 50% of the songs from folks I've never heard of.  Very good.
 jaroslaw wrote:
Just amazing song, one of the best to listen and calm down before falling asleep :)
 
Was going to turn RP off before this song ended to go to sleep but am taking your advice...
Just amazing song, one of the best to listen and calm down before falling asleep :)
Most beautiful.
 helgigermany wrote:
Hey, what a beautiful song. Reading my book, listen to his music, i had to stand up and write this comment. It was a must. This is really very nice!!  {#Music}
 
Me too, but then I wasn't reading a book, I was drinking a beer and surfing the net {#Hearteyes} 9.

Hey, what a beautiful song. Reading my book, listen to his music, i had to stand up and write this comment. It was a must. This is really very nice!!  {#Music}
Excellent song! {#Sunny}
Just love it! {#Music}
 lattalo wrote:
This is so good!!!! Thanks RP would never have heard of Nick Drake if not for you.
 
Me too — I had only heard the ones on the VW commercials.  He surely made a vast collection of music in such a short time!  I borrowed the box set from the library and it was overwhelming to listen to all at once.  I really enjoy hearing the lesser known tracks here, they blend in very well with the rest of the RP playlist.  Timeless.

 Poacher wrote:

Indeed - this is my take on it from research too.

But it does not really matter. . . he is sadly gone. It does bring into focus the saying 'you are a long time dead'. Live every moment, because who knows when your own clock will stop ticking.
 
I kicked you to the curb in another post, but you're very right here. Dammit. Live every moment.  *hugs you*

 chyk5 wrote:
According to the biography of him I read a few years ago, it was never determined if the overdose was intentional or accidental.
 
Indeed - this is my take on it from research too.

But it does not really matter. . . he is sadly gone. It does bring into focus the saying 'you are a long time dead'. Live every moment, because who knows when your own clock will stop ticking.


Nick Drake, 1969. No footage of the adult Drake exists;
he was only ever captured in still photographs and in home
footage from his childhood


I am so totally absorbed by this at the moment. Perfection!
sounds mighty good tonight
Yes, indeed, the Drake is definitely growing on me...perfect song for a drizzly, November day.
Superlative.
 eeke wrote:

overdose of amitriptyline, a type of antidepressant.
wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nick_Drake

  According to the biography of him I read a few years ago, it was never determined if the overdose was intentional or accidental.


Not formerly a Nick fan. But this is a great track.
 jjbix wrote:
how did nick die, overdose?
 
overdose of amitriptyline, a type of antidepressant.
wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nick_Drake

how did nick die, overdose?

Love how this floats in and out and changes tempo as it does.  From the show on Nick they said his guitar work was masterful and without error.


great projects are creating listening this music< thanks
RP listeners (including me) love Nike Drake. There are 16 songs by this artist in the RP library and 11 of them are rated at 8.0 or more....amazing. 
Nick Drake at his best.
 mandolin wrote:
...nick drake thinks he's so cool just because he's dead...
 
Actually, he probably doesn't think at all now that he's dead.

But I think he's cool. And I wish he weren't dead.

But what can you do.

Move on.

Next.

 mandolin wrote:
...nick drake thinks he's so cool just because he's dead...
 

{#Bounce}
...nick drake thinks he's so cool just because he's dead...
i cannot think of anyone who does it more for me - what genius
{#Cowboy} 
I'm not sure if it's a bad or a good thing to have a car commercial bring you into the mainstream, but Volkswagen aside, I love hearing more of his stuff. Thanks!
if only he could have experienced the love so many people now feel for his music...
I wish I had this much talent.
LOVE LOVE LVOE OVLE EVOL =yes!!!!
I've know Nick Drake for ages, love his music. His story is sooo sad, so lonely and so depressing. I never can forget that when I listen...
This is so good!!!! Thanks RP would never have heard of Nick Drake if not for you.
The melody and rhythmic alliteration are from an old English folk song.....Nottaham Town
Beautiful choice. Long live ND.
There's a lot of tension in this song, sort of a somethings going to happen kind of feel but not in a bad way . . . evocative . . . nice
I have heard OF Nick Drake ...& probably heard some. this one rally caught my ear. Made me think of Al Stewart.....road to moscow comes to mind..... thanks RP.