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Paul Simon — Homeless
Album: Graceland
Avg rating:
7.3

Your rating:
Total ratings: 3272









Released: 1986
Length: 3:46
Plays (last 30 days): 4
Emaweni webaba
Silale maweni
Webaba silale maweni
Webaba silale maweni
Webaba silale maweni
Webaba silale maweni
Webaba siiale maweni
Webaba silale maweni
Webaba silale maweni
Webaba silale maweni
Webaba silale maweni

Homeless, homeless
Moonlight sleeping on a midnight lake
Homeless, homeless
Moonlight sleeping on a midnight lake
We are homeless, we are homeless
The moonlight sleeping on a midnight lake
And we are homeless, homeless, homeless
The moonlight sleeping on a midnight lake

Zio yami, zio yami, nhliziyo yami
Nhliziyo yami amakhaza asengi bulele
Nhliziyo yami, nhliziyo yami
Nhliziyo yami, angibulele amakhaza
Nhliziyo yami, nhliziyo yami
Nhliziyo yami somandla angibulele mama
Zio yami, nhliziyo yami
Nhliziyo yami, nhliziyo yami

Too loo loo, too loo loo
Too loo loo loo loo loo loo loo loo loo
Too loo loo, too loo loo
Too loo loo loo loo loo loo loo loo loo

Strong wind destroy our home
Many dead, tonight it could be you
Strong wind, strong wind
Many dead, tonight it could be you

And we are homeless, homeless
Moonlight sleeping on a midnight lake

Homeless, homeless
Moonlight sleeping on a midnight lake
Homeless, homeless
Moonlight sleeping on a midnight lake

Somebody say ih hih ih hih ih
Somebody sing hello, hello, hello
Somebody say ih hih ih hih ih
Somebody cry why, why, why?
Somebody say ih hih ih hih ih
Somebody sing hello, hello, hello
Somebody say ih hih ih hih ih
Somebody cry why, why, why?
Somebody say ih hih ih hih ih

Yitho omanqoba ( ih hih ih hih ih) yitho omanqoba
Esanqoba lonke ilizwe
(ih hih ih hih ih) Yitho omanqoba (ih hih ih hih ih)
Esanqoba phakathi e England
Yitho omanqoha
Esanqoba phakathi e London
Yitho omanqoba
Esanqoba phakathi e England

Somebody say ih hih ih hih ih
Somebody sing hello, hello, hello
Somebody say ih hih ih hih ih
Somebody cry why, why, why?
Somebody say ih hih ih hih ih
Somebody sing hello, hello, hello
Somebody say ih hih ih hih ih
Somebody cry why, why, why?

Kuluman
Kulumani, Kulumani sizwe
Singenze njani
Baya jabula abasi thanda

Yo Ho
Comments (250)add comment
 acolt wrote:

I don't know, the whole White-Guy-Doing-African-Type-Music thing is cringey when Peter Gabriel repeatedly does it, and it's no less cringey here. 



To you. If this is your opinion about 'white-guy doing-African-type-music,' I've got some news for you about, virtually the whole of popular music.
 eyeball wrote:

He is such a weirdo. Melodic. Harmonic. Brilliant. But still a weirdo. And he got to love Carrie Fisher. That makes him mighty.



So many great comments, but this one made me grin quite broadly 
so cool
 meanderer wrote:
This song and album led me to the music of Ladysmith Black Mambazo and wider South African music like Soweto Jive.  For that (and the album itself, which is awesome) I give heartfelt thanks  

šŸ’Æ % agree!! Amazing music!
Iā€™m an atheist as it relates to religion.

However, when it comes to music, Iā€™m most definitely a polytheist.  
Paul Frederic Simon makes my short list of musical gods.  


And ā€” should the human race not annihilate itself first ā€” I predict that this album will still be played, studied, loved ā€” and perhaps even worshipped ā€” centuries from now.
 beerslayer wrote:

Forget Paul Simon.  This song is about Ladysmith Black Mombazo.

Their vocal harmonies are completely amazing.  It's too bad they aren't better known.



They're called Ladysmith Black Mambazo. And yes, they should be more famous, but they're not not famous. They toured the US last summer.
 jrozzelle wrote:

The idea that this is appropriation, that Simon "stole" something, is just silly.  The format of the concert in Frankfurt in 1986 showed what respect Simon had for his collaborators. He introduced each group or singer. They'd take the stage, the spotlight, and perform two or three of their songs.  Simon returned to perform their track from "Graceland." Thanks to Simon I discovered Ray Phiri, LadySmith Black Mombazo, Miriam Makeba. I've written about this moment from this concert elsewhere but Miriam Makeba! Simon introduced her. She performed a song then spoke to the audience. She used a lilting singsong girlish voice. She spoke of how much she enjoyed working with Simon, how thankful she was to tour with him, and then she said, "I hope some day to invite Mr. Simon to perform with me"---then she gripped the mic with both hands and held it close as her voice went into a different otherworldly register--"IN A FREE SOUTH AFRICA."  The audience was stunned for a moment then erupted.  How much this album raised awareness of Apartheid and helped end it.  




Very true  & very well stated!!
I love the beginning of this song
Memories of growing up to this in SA, we were proud
This song and album led me to the music of Ladysmith Black Mambazo and wider South African music like Soweto Jive.  For that (and the album itself, which is awesome) I give heartfelt thanks  
1986 and I was living in Johannesburg. This album was a revelation for us - a famous artist had found this amazing group and recorded with them. The system was so effective that most of us (white) South Africans had never heard of them. Within seven years Mandela had been released. What a time!
The idea that this is appropriation, that Simon "stole" something, is just silly.  The format of the concert in Frankfurt in 1986 showed what respect Simon had for his collaborators. He introduced each group or singer. They'd take the stage, the spotlight, and perform two or three of their songs.  Simon returned to perform their track from "Graceland." Thanks to Simon I discovered Ray Phiri, LadySmith Black Mombazo, Miriam Makeba. I've written about this moment from this concert elsewhere but Miriam Makeba! Simon introduced her. She performed a song then spoke to the audience. She used a lilting singsong girlish voice. She spoke of how much she enjoyed working with Simon, how thankful she was to tour with him, and then she said, "I hope some day to invite Mr. Simon to perform with me"---then she gripped the mic with both hands and held it close as her voice went into a different otherworldly register--"IN A FREE SOUTH AFRICA."  The audience was stunned for a moment then erupted.  How much this album raised awareness of Apartheid and helped end it.  
I tried to introduce RP to Zap Mama, but to my surprise, they rejected them!  If you know them, you won't get it either!  
 beerslayer wrote:

Forget Paul Simon.  This song is about Ladysmith Black Mombazo.

Their vocal harmonies are completely amazing.  It's too bad they aren't better known.



They come to my local venue, The Bellyup Tavern, often and they are one of the best shows I've ever seen there.  Not one instrument in the house other than their voices.  Amazing show.
 vidkween wrote:


AMEN! I'm so sick of this whole 'wokeness' and 'cultural appropriation' garbage at anyone who enjoys and embraces other cultures with passion. Just so sick of it.


I would like to add to this:  Paul Simon is an American.  Cultural appropriation is our culture, which isn't a bad thing.  Melting pot and all, right?
 Wonderloaf wrote:

The "Within You Without You" of an otherwise perfect LP



What's wrong with "Within You Without You"? It's an integral part of the "feel" of Sgt Peppers and of the time. 
I guess RP must grate on you.
 erikdelaquis wrote:



These types of comments really make me curious: are there any circumstances  to you in which it's not 'cringey' for a non-African to engage with the huge diversity and richness of African music? Paul Simon took the time to travel to South Africa, seek out, listen, understand, co-wrote and co-performed, gave credit to the local musicians he played with, split royalties with them, later did world tours with them... I mean if this is not a respectful cultural exchange among musicians then... what would that look like? Nelson Mandela even invited Paul Simon to play in Joburg right after apartheid ended.


AMEN! I'm so sick of this whole 'wokeness' and 'cultural appropriation' garbage at anyone who enjoys and embraces other cultures with passion. Just so sick of it.
 acolt wrote:

I don't know, the whole White-Guy-Doing-African-Type-Music thing is cringey when Peter Gabriel repeatedly does it, and it's no less cringey here. 



Instead of whining and crying out "cringey" and cultural appropriation why don't you try embracing that artists are recognizing other cultures and giving homage by including actual native artists? So now one can't like other country's music and sing it and play it without the whole ridiculous woke notion of "cultural appropriation" ruining the mood? Get a life, better yet, develop some mental maturity instead of just going with the 'flow'.
 erikdelaquis wrote:



These types of comments really make me curious: are there any circumstances  to you in which it's not 'cringey' for a non-African to engage with the huge diversity and richness of African music? Paul Simon took the time to travel to South Africa, seek out, listen, understand, co-wrote and co-performed, gave credit to the local musicians he played with, split royalties with them, later did world tours with them... I mean if this is not a respectful cultural exchange among musicians then... what would that look like? Nelson Mandela even invited Paul Simon to play in Joburg right after apartheid ended.



Very well stated!
 thewiseking wrote:

Why would I listen to Paul Simon's take on World Music when I can listen to the real thing? 



90% of this song, if not more, is LBM. They aren't the real thing?
 acolt wrote:

I don't know, the whole White-Guy-Doing-African-Type-Music thing is cringey when Peter Gabriel repeatedly does it, and it's no less cringey here. 




These types of comments really make me curious: are there any circumstances  to you in which it's not 'cringey' for a non-African to engage with the huge diversity and richness of African music? Paul Simon took the time to travel to South Africa, seek out, listen, understand, co-wrote and co-performed, gave credit to the local musicians he played with, split royalties with them, later did world tours with them... I mean if this is not a respectful cultural exchange among musicians then... what would that look like? Nelson Mandela even invited Paul Simon to play in Joburg right after apartheid ended.
 Egctheow wrote:

Love this, but can't help thinking, "Omelette, Omelette, why don't we fry up some bacon" Not (entirely) my fault. Back in the 1990s, a French group of comedians did their own version of SNL and this is one of the things they came up with.

Great song though. Can't really understand the fuss about cultural appropriation. Sounds more like sharing and expanding one's musical horizons to me. Thank you Mr Simon. 



Most of those whinging about appropriation likely would have never heard of the artists he collaborated with on this, if he hadn't made this album.
I don't know, the whole White-Guy-Doing-African-Type-Music thing is cringey when Peter Gabriel repeatedly does it, and it's no less cringey here. 
EXCELLENT!!!
The harmonies are so wonderful in this song
Love this, but can't help thinking, "Omelette, Omelette, why don't we fry up some bacon" Not (entirely) my fault. Back in the 1990s, a French group of comedians did their own version of SNL and this is one of the things they came up with.

Great song though. Can't really understand the fuss about cultural appropriation. Sounds more like sharing and expanding one's musical horizons to me. Thank you Mr Simon. 
I never hear this song the same way twice, and every time I hear it, I can't help but feel its divine magic resonate deep within my soul...
the best! :)
 thewiseking wrote:

More cultural appropriation from the Lil fella from Queens. Let's stick to his folk songs with Art.


If LBM does not complain, why are you. He opened up the world for them and they walked through. You might never have heard them if not for Mr. Simon!
 sfyi2001 wrote:
What CRAP

"Brevity is the soul of wit" - Shakespeare
The "Within You Without You" of an otherwise perfect LP
 thewiseking wrote:
Why would I listen to Paul Simon's take on World Music when I can listen to the real thing? 
 
Because when different cultures, styles and ideas mix new and exciting things sometimes emerge. This is a great example of just that.
I've got this synced stream running on a pc, and I have a downloaded stream from last week running out in the warehouse, and both played Homeless at the same time (warehouse is a few minutes behind).
Gave it 8 .   6 just for LBM.  2 for Paul  Simon. 
He is such a weirdo. Melodic. Harmonic. Brilliant. But still a weirdo. And he got to love Carrie Fisher. That makes him mighty.
"Moonlight sleeping on a midnight lake"


What an image!
 thewiseking wrote:
Why would I listen to Paul Simon's take on World Music when I can listen to the real thing? 
 
Silly comment. Simon was just collaborating. He liked the Afro sound. It is good. 
R.I.P. Joseph Shabalala
11.02.2020
 beerslayer wrote:
Forget Paul Simon.  This song is about Ladysmith Black Mombazo.

Their vocal harmonies are completely amazing.  It's too bad they aren't better known.
 
I saw them live when I was about 12. Unforgettable experience.
 beerslayer wrote:
Forget Paul Simon.  This song is about Ladysmith Black Mombazo.

Their vocal harmonies are completely amazing.  It's too bad they aren't better known.

Do not forget Paul Simon, he brought them to our attention, before him they were just a local  band. BTW it is "Mambazo", meaning axe in Zulu.
This album was a mind-blower because of songs like this one.
@thewiseking - if it hadn't been for Paul Simon and Peter Gabriel bringing World Music to mainstream radio in North America in the 80s you likely wouldn't even know it existed now. And thanks to RP you currently have the pleasure of listening to both options. You should be celebrating not kvetching.
Why would I listen to Paul Simon's take on World Music when I can listen to the real thing? 
This is one of the albums that changed the way I listened to music! I think many music lovers have those few pieces that need multiple copies due to constant appreciation and learning
 h8rhater wrote:



Oh, come on. As he indicated, Fred's just being pedantic.

Pedantic:  
means "like a pedant," someone who's too concerned with literal accuracy or formality. It's a negative term that implies someone is showing off book learning or trivia, especially in a tiresome way.

Also, this song is indeed great!
 
I've got this one rated at 8, though I noticed that Paul's middle name is "Frederic" so maybe Fred was being too hard on his 'namesake' - LLRP!!
It's not appropriation...it's called creative collaboration. Guess you need to be from NYC to understand true cultural appreciation. 
 beerslayer wrote:
Forget Paul Simon.  This song is about Ladysmith Black Mombazo.

Their vocal harmonies are completely amazing.  It's too bad they aren't better known.
 
but they are, now!
This song is rated fairly high - I'm sitting here thinking it's got to get better.  Finally made it to the end and am keeping my original rating of 4.
 drsteevo wrote:

English is a living language, and I am sure your version in England is different than Bluedot's in California.  However, I can assure you that everyone in the US understood what Bluedot meant when they wrote "most clueless comment" ā€” the "clueless" was being used as a synonym for stupid.  So, "clueless" can most certainly be comparative in colloquial English. 

Also, this song is great!

 


Oh, come on. As he indicated, Fred's just being pedantic.

Pedantic:  
means "like a pedant," someone who's too concerned with literal accuracy or formality. It's a negative term that implies someone is showing off book learning or trivia, especially in a tiresome way.

Also, this song is indeed great!
 thewiseking wrote:
More cultural appropriation from the Lil fella from Queens. Let's stick to his folk songs with Art.
 
Feel free.  Over there, please, away from the folks who like this just fine.
 sfyi2001 wrote:
What CRAP
 
Alas, almost no Kid Rock or Ted Nugent played here.
It must be tough on you.

 beerslayer wrote:
Forget Paul Simon.  This song is about Ladysmith Black Mombazo.

Their vocal harmonies are completely amazing.  It's too bad they aren't better known.
 

Indeed. But if it weren't for Paul Simon, it's possible you may never have heard this. That can't be bad. (Not that you said it was.)
More cultural appropriation from the Lil fella from Queens. Let's stick to his folk songs with Art.
Oh...  perfect for the start of the day!!  What a great album!
Forget Paul Simon.  This song is about Ladysmith Black Mombazo.

Their vocal harmonies are completely amazing.  It's too bad they aren't better known.
 maboleth wrote:
Utter trash.
 
You and sfyi should run off together; I'm sure you'd be very happy.
 sfyi2001 wrote:
What CRAP

 
Your clever use of bolding almost convinced me.  But no.
 sfyi2001 wrote:
What CRAP

 
Your detailed and eloquent critique speaks volumes of your intellect.
 Springbok84 wrote:

Yes a very talented group!

Very lucky if you get to see them live. Their drumming is fantastic and they utilize lovely harmonics  

 
Ladysmith Black Mambazo still tours regularly, and performed this song when I saw them in January in Berkeley, although this year the cost of tickets increased dramatically due to the rand against the dollar (but they still sold out the venue, at $55-60 a ticket). Fortunately, having met Ladysmith Black Mambazo in South Africa in 2002, we were on the guest list for their show and went backstage after the show also.
 sfyi2001 wrote:
What CRAP

 
Is one of my favorite albums of all time.  It works from beginning to end.  Makes me very happy.  
Was fortunate to catch the 'Graceland' tour years ago. Paul's interaction with all the other performers was remarkable - he was 'just another' musician in the group. The amazing Hugh Masekela (RIP) also featured.
Ok, I really like this album but I still think he's a jerk and needs a testosterone shot.
What CRAP
A parting of the clouds of crap 80s music when this album came out. What a great thing it was/is.
I just don't get this guy :^ /
 Springbok84 wrote:

Yes a very talented group!

Very lucky if you get to see them live. Their drumming is fantastic and they utilize lovely harmonics  
 
Indeed. I saw Paul Simon with Ladysmith Black Mambazo on tour. They were incredible together.
 Windsprite wrote:
 If you love this music, check out Ladysmith Black Mambazo, who, if I am not mistaken, is singing here, with a little help from Paul.

 
Yes a very talented group!

Very lucky if you get to see them live. Their drumming is fantastic and they utilize lovely harmonics  
 If you love this music, check out Ladysmith Black Mambazo, who, if I am not mistaken, is singing here, with a little help from Paul.
Was lucky to see the making of this album on a special, a long time ago. These beautiful voices are also wonderful people.
 Carrizito wrote:
What I wonder: does Paul Simon have another one like this or Rhythm of Saints in him ?

 
Only if he happens to hear anything else worth nicking.  I'm a fan but they do say if you see Paul Simon around you should lock up your beats.
 Derecho wrote:
I'm quite certain I hear a Scooby-Doo ghost in there in places.

 
I hear those ghosts all the time; I eventually stopped listening to them.
ghost
 ScottFromWyoming wrote:
Just learned that Ladysmith Black Mambazo is coming to Billings, Montana in a few months. I think we'll have to make plans.

 
How was the concert? 
Pure magic to my ears

 
beautiful voices as instruments that carry my spirit high and full of joy each time I hear this fabulous song, pure joy : )
This song, this whole album fits perfectly in times when we are searching for answers. It makes me happy, sad and hopefull
Another one of those songs that is great on its own, but even better as part of a greater album.
 Lazarus wrote:

great song from one of the top ten albums of all time...
 

 
Awww, memories of 1986 summertime :-)

a solid 9!
 Lazarus wrote:

great song from one of the top ten albums of all time...
 

 
Yes  : )
What I wonder: does Paul Simon have another one like this or Rhythm of Saints in him ?
Conjunction Junction what's you're function?
 
 Ahnyer_Keester wrote:
I gave it a 10 but really, you have to do that for the entire album.

 I agree; Few albums can match the writing and production of this one.  {#Clap} 


I didn't know Scooby Doo had passed.  How did he die?  And where can I send flowers?

{#Roflol} 

Derecho wrote:
I'm quite certain I hear a Scooby-Doo ghost in there in places.

 


fabulous album, bet it was cool recording it
Just learned that Ladysmith Black Mambazo is coming to Billings, Montana in a few months. I think we'll have to make plans.
One of the most talented artists of the 20th century
Wow. The photos in the slideshow completely changed the song for me... Damn I feel bad. 
Everybody in my mushrooming multitude of homeless camps loves this marvelous song, and the profound album...
I gave it a 10 but really, you have to do that for the entire album.
I'm quite certain I hear a Scooby-Doo ghost in there in places.
I listen and read this Great music and its so soothing, and beautiful, true, it could be me next time, so I need to remember my love
Peace People! 
 oldfart48 wrote:

they are the song....{#Dance}

 
prob why i like this one
 Hn wrote:
Not much credit here to the group that really makes the song sound so excellent: Ladysmith Black Mambazo{#Think}

 
they are the song....{#Dance}
Dropped from 5 to a 4.  Just keep playing it, and it will soon be a big fat ZERO!  {#Ass}

great song from one of the top ten albums of all time...
 
sehr schönes Album 
Not much credit here to the group that really makes the song sound so excellent: Ladysmith Black Mambazo{#Think}
 jonno_norton wrote:
One of the greatest albums of all times. Not anything spectacular by today's standards; we import sounds from all over the world and disguise them as American classics. But you have to give Paul Simon credit for doing it so well, and not being afraid to admit it up front instead of plagiarizing the cultures he borrowed from in creating this album. And the song writing is amazing too. 

 
I absolutely agree! Quite a story behind this album and it's significance in the world of music can't be overstated. 
A true spiritual song
One of the greatest albums of all times. Not anything spectacular by today's standards; we import sounds from all over the world and disguise them as American classics. But you have to give Paul Simon credit for doing it so well, and not being afraid to admit it up front instead of plagiarizing the cultures he borrowed from in creating this album. And the song writing is amazing too. 
Everybody in my rehab group loves this song!
best album by paul simon listen to vocalsj
Better live...

Everybody in my church loves this song...
 
 ch83575 wrote:
Graceland haters?  Seriously?

This is one of the greatest albums of all time, at least in my book.  The whole thing is perfect, simply perfect.
 
I couldn't agree more. Absolutely amazing album with some absolutely amazing artists. 
ughh
Graceland haters?  Seriously?

This is one of the greatest albums of all time, at least in my book.  The whole thing is perfect, simply perfect.
I wish he'd shut up and let Ladysmith sing.
Excellent album! Great song. Thanks for the good vibes and the well chosen music- everyday! Greets from France!
a solid 5 {#No}
This was really good on the speaker  of my new (to me)1965 Austin A55. That car is now history - not a bad place to leave PS.
 Byronape wrote:
 
I get what he's saying, but us Americans have taken over the Queen's English and made our own bastardized language.  And since we are also lazy, improper usage starts to gain ground and become accepted.  

 

Not true.
 Byronape wrote:



On a side note, I'm going to start using the expression "the mutt's nuts".  That's just awesome for a mental child like myself.

 
 
I've also heard "the dog's underplums" used too, if you're seeking a little more canine testicular variety in your compliments.
 fredriley wrote:

A pedant writes: 'clueless' can't be comparative. You either have clues, or you don't, and if you don't you can't be more or less clueless than someone else. 

I can't be doing with Paul Simon's 'homages' (aka appropriations/rip-offs) of African music. Keep the Africans, ditch PS, IMO. But what the hey, others think he's the dog's bollox so wtf do I know? Other than to hit mute when he starts warbling. 
 
Cynaera wrote:

fredriley, I tried to slog through that miasma of incomprehensible garble - I really did! But I don't understand what you were trying to say.  I'm guessing you didn't like the song.

Please dumb it down for me, okay? I'm not college-educated.

 

Fred's making a grammar argument that the word "clueless" was used incorrectly when being used to compare things.  I get what he's saying, but us Americans have taken over the Queen's English and made our own bastardized language.  And since we are also lazy, improper usage starts to gain ground and become accepted.  

He's also saying that he doesn't think Paul Simon should be doing anything with African music.  He's suggesting that we exchange real music making Africans for Paul Simon and let Paul jump into the next lions mouth.  

The next sentence is saying basically that others think he's great.   Also, the expression "dog's bollox" (aka the mutt's nuts) is actually commonly used as a positive thing (thanks for the previous correction Fred) despite it's actual content.  

For an interesting read regarding the expression...

https://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/dog's%20bollocks.html

On a side note, I'm going to start using the expression "the mutt's nuts".  That's just awesome for a mental child like myself.

 
If I ever hear this again, it will be too soon.
Please delete this song from playlist!
 fredriley wrote:
A pedant writes: 'clueless' can't be comparative. You either have clues, or you don't, and if you don't you can't be more or less clueless than someone else.
 
English is a living language, and I am sure your version in England is different than Bluedot's in California.  However, I can assure you that everyone in the US understood what Bluedot meant when they wrote "most clueless comment" — the "clueless" was being used as a synonym for stupid.  So, "clueless" can most certainly be comparative in colloquial English. 

Also, this song is great!

OMELET, omelet    to see onions      hum i'm hungry !
2 lim 1