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The Beatles — Things We Said Today
Album: A Hard Day's Night
Avg rating:
8.1

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1167








Released: 1964
Length: 2:32
Plays (last 30 days): 1
You say you will love me
If I have to go
You'll be thinking of me
Somehow I will know
Someday when I'm lonely
Wishing you weren't so far away
Then I will remember
Things we said today

You say you'll be mine, girl
Till the end of time
These days such a kind girl
Seems so hard to find
Someday when we're dreaming
Deep in love, not a lot to say
Then we will remember
Things we said today

Me, I'm just the lucky kind
Love to hear you say that love is love
And though we may be blind
Love is here to stay and that's enough

To make you mine, girl
Be the only one
Love me all the time, girl
We'll go on and on

Some day when we're dreaming
Deep in love not a lot to say
Then we will remember
Things we said today

Me, I'm just the lucky kind
Love to hear you say that love is love
And though we may be blind
Love is here to stay and that's enough

To make you mine, girl
Be the only one
Love me all the time, girl
We'll go on and on

Some day when we're dreaming
Deep in love, not a lot to say
Then we will remember
Things we said today
Comments (74)add comment
yeah - the old best days in music and more
 phlattop wrote:
Quincy came from jazz so he may have been dismissive of pop/rock.
Great producer but beyond "Killer Joe", what else did he write? Maybe he was jealous about how prolific the Beatles were with their high quality songwriting. Two of the greatest songwriters of the 20th century and the 3rd guy would have been the main songwriter in almost any other band.

His criticism seems to be about their musical abilities, not their songwriting prowess.  Apparently Jones called McCartney about the statements, saying he was misquoted.
I could hear the Yarbirds doing this, most excellent!
 kingart wrote:

A piece of a 2/7 Variety interview with Quincy Jones reveals he had/has little musical respect for the Fabs

The Beatles were terrible musicians.

“They were the worst musicians in the world. They were no-playing motherf—ers. Paul was the worst bass player I ever heard. And Ringo? Don’t even talk about it. I remember once we were in the studio with George Martin, and Ringo had taken three hours for a four-bar thing he was trying to fix on a song. He couldn’t get it. We said, ‘Mate, why don’t you get some lager and lime, some shepherd’s pie, and take an hour-and-a-half and relax a little bit.’ So he did, and we called Ronnie Verrell, a jazz drummer. Ronnie came in for 15 minutes and tore it up. Ringo comes back and says, ‘George, can you play it back for me one more time?’ So George did, and Ringo says, ‘That didn’t sound so bad.’ And I said, ‘Yeah, motherf—er because it ain’t you.’ Great guy, though.




Yeah, and what did Quincy Jones ever do for us?
Like.......wow!
 kingart wrote:

Yeah. And how many times did that happen? Was QJ at every recording session? And...I'm not aware that Mr. Jones's protege Michael Jackson played any instrument whatsoever other than his vocal chords and his dancing body.  Perhaps Jones might have acknowledged that after this passive aggressive babble.  

Maybe it's true that separately the Fabs were not Juilliard geniuses (except that Lennon and McCartney each played several instruments), I don't know, but together their blend seems to tell a very different story.  It's highly unlikely they would ever have become stellar tunesmiths and melody masters with low-end musical talent. 


Maybe Quincy was just having a bad day 
Play this more Bill!
Ringo is a very good drummer. I am a drummer. And his style is very personal and endless when you lesson well the beat and brake
I recall Steven Wilson once saying that he was not that fond of the Beatles.  Porcupine Tree's Time Flies is playing as I type this.

Yet, I find myself thinking of the Beatles constantly when listening Porcupine Tree's Stupid Dream and Lightbulb Sun albums.
 kingart wrote:

A piece of a 2/7 Variety interview with Quincy Jones reveals he had/has little musical respect for the Fabs

The Beatles were terrible musicians.

“They were the worst musicians in the world. They were no-playing motherf—ers. Paul was the worst bass player I ever heard. And Ringo? Don’t even talk about it. I remember once we were in the studio with George Martin, and Ringo had taken three hours for a four-bar thing he was trying to fix on a song. He couldn’t get it. We said, ‘Mate, why don’t you get some lager and lime, some shepherd’s pie, and take an hour-and-a-half and relax a little bit.’ So he did, and we called Ronnie Verrell, a jazz drummer. Ronnie came in for 15 minutes and tore it up. Ringo comes back and says, ‘George, can you play it back for me one more time?’ So George did, and Ringo says, ‘That didn’t sound so bad.’ And I said, ‘Yeah, motherf—er because it ain’t you.’ Great guy, though.




No disrespect but... who cares really? 
It's the bloody Beatles... it doesn't make their music sound less good and nobody puts on Rubber Soul to hear a polyrhythmic drum solo from Ringo
1964?! Wow.
 kingart wrote:
A piece of a 2/7 Variety interview with Quincy Jones reveals he had/has little musical respect for the Fabs

The Beatles were terrible musicians.

“They were the worst musicians in the world. They were no-playing motherf—ers. Paul was the worst bass player I ever heard. And Ringo? Don’t even talk about it. I remember once we were in the studio with George Martin, and Ringo had taken three hours for a four-bar thing he was trying to fix on a song. He couldn’t get it. We said, ‘Mate, why don’t you get some lager and lime, some shepherd’s pie, and take an hour-and-a-half and relax a little bit.’ So he did, and we called Ronnie Verrell, a jazz drummer. Ronnie came in for 15 minutes and tore it up. Ringo comes back and says, ‘George, can you play it back for me one more time?’ So George did, and Ringo says, ‘That didn’t sound so bad.’ And I said, ‘Yeah, motherf—er because it ain’t you.’ Great guy, though.


 
Quince can be bitter I guess - Peter Jackson is in the process of making a film about the Beatles, looks like they can play to me. Poor old Ringo, they always pick on the drummer.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=UocEGv...
 kingart wrote:
A piece of a 2/7 Variety interview with Quincy Jones reveals he had/has little musical respect for the Fabs

The Beatles were terrible musicians.

“They were the worst musicians in the world. They were no-playing motherf—ers. Paul was the worst bass player I ever heard. And Ringo? Don’t even talk about it. I remember once we were in the studio with George Martin, and Ringo had taken three hours for a four-bar thing he was trying to fix on a song. He couldn’t get it. We said, ‘Mate, why don’t you get some lager and lime, some shepherd’s pie, and take an hour-and-a-half and relax a little bit.’ So he did, and we called Ronnie Verrell, a jazz drummer. Ronnie came in for 15 minutes and tore it up. Ringo comes back and says, ‘George, can you play it back for me one more time?’ So George did, and Ringo says, ‘That didn’t sound so bad.’ And I said, ‘Yeah, motherf—er because it ain’t you.’ Great guy, though.


 

Quincy came from jazz so he may have been dismissive of pop/rock.
Great producer but beyond "Killer Joe", what else did he write? Maybe he was jealous about how prolific the Beatles were with their high quality songwriting. Two of the greatest songwriters of the 20th century and the 3rd guy would have been the main songwriter in almost any other band.
 kingart wrote:

Yeah. And how many times did that happen? Was QJ at every recording session? And...I'm not aware that Mr. Jones's protege Michael Jackson played any instrument whatsoever other than his vocal chords and his dancing body.  Perhaps Jones might have acknowledged that after this passive aggressive babble.  

Maybe it's true that separately the Fabs were not Juilliard geniuses (except that Lennon and McCartney each played several instruments), I don't know, but together their blend seems to tell a very different story.  It's highly unlikely they would ever have become stellar tunesmiths and melody masters with low-end musical talent. 
 

I don't think this is an attack on the Beatles. I've heard the same thing from many musicians. However, none of them could craft a tune of such enduring appeal. I liked the Beatles. All my adult children Millenials, Gen Z and Zoomers like the Beatles. I can appreciate that there existed and exists still better musicians, together or separately, than the Beatles. They should go write Helter Skelter.
For me, there is a hard stop between the early and late Beatles. I don't really tolerate the early stuff, myself. 
 kingart wrote:

Yeah. And how many times did that happen? Was QJ at every recording session? And...I'm not aware that Mr. Jones's protege Michael Jackson played any instrument whatsoever other than his vocal chords and his dancing body.  Perhaps Jones might have acknowledged that after this passive aggressive babble.  

Maybe it's true that separately the Fabs were not Juilliard geniuses (except that Lennon and McCartney each played several instruments), I don't know, but together their blend seems to tell a very different story.  It's highly unlikely they would ever have become stellar tunesmiths and melody masters with low-end musical talent. 
 

Was Mozart a good pianist ? i don't know and i don't care,  genius simply goes beyond that.
 kingart wrote:
A piece of a 2/7 Variety interview with Quincy Jones reveals he had/has little musical respect for the Fabs

The Beatles were terrible musicians.

“They were the worst musicians in the world. They were no-playing motherf—ers. Paul was the worst bass player I ever heard. And Ringo? Don’t even talk about it. I remember once we were in the studio with George Martin, and Ringo had taken three hours for a four-bar thing he was trying to fix on a song. He couldn’t get it. We said, ‘Mate, why don’t you get some lager and lime, some shepherd’s pie, and take an hour-and-a-half and relax a little bit.’ So he did, and we called Ronnie Verrell, a jazz drummer. Ronnie came in for 15 minutes and tore it up. Ringo comes back and says, ‘George, can you play it back for me one more time?’ So George did, and Ringo says, ‘That didn’t sound so bad.’ And I said, ‘Yeah, motherf—er because it ain’t you.’ Great guy, though.


 
Yeah. And how many times did that happen? Was QJ at every recording session? And...I'm not aware that Mr. Jones's protege Michael Jackson played any instrument whatsoever other than his vocal chords and his dancing body.  Perhaps Jones might have acknowledged that after this passive aggressive babble.  

Maybe it's true that separately the Fabs were not Juilliard geniuses (except that Lennon and McCartney each played several instruments), I don't know, but together their blend seems to tell a very different story.  It's highly unlikely they would ever have become stellar tunesmiths and melody masters with low-end musical talent. 
A piece of a 2/7 Variety interview with Quincy Jones reveals he had/has little musical respect for the Fabs

The Beatles were terrible musicians.

“They were the worst musicians in the world. They were no-playing motherf—ers. Paul was the worst bass player I ever heard. And Ringo? Don’t even talk about it. I remember once we were in the studio with George Martin, and Ringo had taken three hours for a four-bar thing he was trying to fix on a song. He couldn’t get it. We said, ‘Mate, why don’t you get some lager and lime, some shepherd’s pie, and take an hour-and-a-half and relax a little bit.’ So he did, and we called Ronnie Verrell, a jazz drummer. Ronnie came in for 15 minutes and tore it up. Ringo comes back and says, ‘George, can you play it back for me one more time?’ So George did, and Ringo says, ‘That didn’t sound so bad.’ And I said, ‘Yeah, motherf—er because it ain’t you.’ Great guy, though.


Don't want to dis the iconic Beatles, but this song is uninspiring.  
 BCarn wrote:
The Beatles. Doesn't get any better.

 

     Agreed{#Propeller}
The Beatles. Doesn't get any better.
{#Daisy}
One of their best early pieces.
They made writing brilliant songs seem so effortless. I saw Macca play in Portland a few weeks ago. He performed magnificently. Great set-list too:

 
A Hard Day's Night
Save Us
Can't Buy Me Love
Letting Go
Temporary Secretary
Let Me Roll It (with 'Foxy Lady' outro)
I've Got a Feeling
My Valentine
Nineteen Hundred and Eighty-Five
Here, There and Everywhere
(performed on piano)
Maybe I'm Amazed
 
On acoustic guitar:
We Can Work It Out
In Spite of All the Danger
(The Quarrymen song)
You Won't See Me
Love Me Do
And I Love Her
Blackbird
Here Today
 
Electric Set Pt. 2:
Queenie Eye
New
The Fool on the Hill
Lady Madonna
FourFiveSeconds
Eleanor Rigby
Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite!
(Lennon tribute)
Something
(Harrison tribute)
Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da
Band on the Run
Back in the U.S.S.R.
Let It Be
Live and Let Die
Hey Jude
 
Encore:
Yesterday
Hi, Hi, Hi
Birthday
Golden Slumbers
Carry That Weight
The End

Loved the Beatles.  Hate to say this, but I am over them.
 
So simple and so outstanding
I always thought this was a McCartney's song in his solo career! Not surpriosingly the Beatles original version that I now hear for the first time sounds way better :-)
 ppopp wrote:
Great song from a superb album.

 
That pretty much sums it up .... great harmonies!
Great song from a superb album.
this has always been one of my favorite Beatles songs - something about it just never makes it sound old, dated, boring...
Four "1" votes? 
Miscreants. 
 WonderLizard wrote:


Yes, the US/Capitol album was red with black lettering. The Britain/Parolophone album was the blue one above.

 


Everybody in my homeless camp loves this song...  we be dancing...
I mean, come on, what more do you want? Or what can any mortal expect?
 DD gypsyman wrote:
Had this on vinyl. Original cover was red and black, I believe.

 

Yes, the US/Capitol album was red with black lettering. The Britain/Parolophone album was the blue one above.
Just the other day I thought how rarely the earlier Beatles are played on RP. Almost forgot how they sound.
{#Heartkiss}  ...... such a great song taken from an album often overlooked from the band.  Must be "Godlike" for song and album
 raga wrote:
8 > 10 (why 8? {#Stupid})

 
wassamattayou?
8 > 10 (why 8? {#Stupid})
 Pedro1874 wrote:
just sang every word without even thinking about remembering and I am halfway to senility! Such a huge part of my youth. Saw them in the clubs in Liverpool. Hamburg and in their first big tour second on the bill to the Big O! Still have the programme and all the vinyl albums.
 

“Everybody's born knowing all the Beatles lyrics instinctively. They're passed into the fetus subconsciously along with all the amniotic stuff. They should be called "The Fetals".”
Sliding Doors (1998) – James Hammerton (John Hannah) 
just sang every word without even thinking about remembering and I am halfway to senility! Such a huge part of my youth. Saw them in the clubs in Liverpool. Hamburg and in their first big tour second on the bill to the Big O! Still have the programme and all the vinyl albums.
 Clark_Novato wrote:
great harmonies typical of mid-period Beatles.

I've just been re-viewing the Beatles Anthology.  It does a great job of surveying their music.  But I am disappointed by the lack of coverage of their creative process.  I get more satisfaction from a Terry Gross interview.

 
She was with the Beatles?! Who knew?
 gypsyman wrote:
Had this on vinyl. Original cover was red and black, I believe.

 
The UK original vinyl LP looked exactly like the label shown here on RP.

Everybody in my churches loves this song...
 
Beautiful harmonies.  From the best rock and roll movie ever made.

This song still puts a spring in my step...  love it...
 
 lunatic wrote:
The Beatles are loved by me and mine. Both grandchildren are named after Beatles songs.
 
My elder daughter is named for her grandmother—but there's a bit of her that's after Lennon's mother, Julia. My ex was horrified that had we a boy, I would have pushed hard (NPI) for John Winston Lennon ______. She quickly agreed to Julia.
Had this on vinyl. Original cover was red and black, I believe.
The Beatles are loved by me and mine. Both grandchildren are named after Beatles songs.
This song was the first time I understood that an acoustic guitar could be amplified (John's Gibson J-160E I think) and introduce a different brand of dynamics into a song. Yes, Elvis played an acoustic guitar, as did Roy Orbison and the Everly Brothers, but I don't recall that they were amplified or played a prominent role in the production's instrumentation or sound. Okay, even if I was behind the curve, "Things We Said Today" was a revelation.
Lovely. 
Love this early Beatles stuff.
 
everything I love about the Beatles can pretty much be found in this song. sweeet
 Canlistener wrote:
sounds like every other Beatles song....
 
Huh?

You gots the dain bramage, dude. 
deep in Love...not a lot to say....
Prefect timing!!!
 subdude wrote:
A beautiful song. great song construction!
 
Couldn't agree more! Cool
sounds like every other Beatles song....
used to own the LP, always one of my favourites tracks from it. Haven't heard it for yonks! 
Ah..the things I remember !
Sorry, please, get it over with already...
great harmonies typical of mid-period Beatles.

I've just been re-viewing the Beatles Anthology.  It does a great job of surveying their music.  But I am disappointed by the lack of coverage of their creative process.  I get more satisfaction from a Terry Gross interview.
Yes, WOW! That was nice!

Different from the version I remember. Must have been off a different (later) album?

This one has a really nice innocence to it, somehow, the way it's arranged and instrumented.
 coyotecosmic wrote:
Hey look! There are no "things we said today!"
 

Darn I was too late!

Hey look! There are no "things we said today!"
A beautiful song. great song construction!
Wow!   1964.  Remember the movie well.