[ ]   [ ]   [ ]                        [ ]      [ ]   [ ]

Pink Floyd Set? - Manbird - Sep 30, 2022 - 10:35pm
 
Lowest rated song you gave a 10 - kurtster - Sep 30, 2022 - 10:30pm
 
Mixtape Culture Club - KurtfromLaQuinta - Sep 30, 2022 - 10:06pm
 
Baseball, anyone? - islander - Sep 30, 2022 - 9:34pm
 
Wordle - daily game - NoEnzLefttoSplit - Sep 30, 2022 - 8:39pm
 
What makes you smile? - kcar - Sep 30, 2022 - 7:05pm
 
Name My Band - GeneP59 - Sep 30, 2022 - 5:04pm
 
Ukraine - black321 - Sep 30, 2022 - 3:04pm
 
Derplahoma! - Red_Dragon - Sep 30, 2022 - 2:07pm
 
Britain - R_P - Sep 30, 2022 - 1:07pm
 
Things You Thought Today - Coaxial - Sep 30, 2022 - 12:19pm
 
Counting with Pictures - Proclivities - Sep 30, 2022 - 10:54am
 
Can I use my ratings to create a playlist? - buddy - Sep 30, 2022 - 8:16am
 
Radio Paradise Comments - buddy - Sep 30, 2022 - 8:10am
 
Russia - NoEnzLefttoSplit - Sep 30, 2022 - 7:54am
 
Artificial Intelligence - miamizsun - Sep 30, 2022 - 4:52am
 
Favorite Quotes - sirdroseph - Sep 30, 2022 - 4:23am
 
Radio Paradise NFL Pick'em Group - islander - Sep 29, 2022 - 9:36pm
 
260,000 Posts in one thread? - GeneP59 - Sep 29, 2022 - 8:31pm
 
Two questions. That's it. I promise. - GeneP59 - Sep 29, 2022 - 4:26pm
 
Guns - R_P - Sep 29, 2022 - 2:36pm
 
Recommended documentaries - haresfur - Sep 29, 2022 - 1:38pm
 
The Obituary Page - miamizsun - Sep 29, 2022 - 12:27pm
 
• • • The Once-a-Day • • •  - oldviolin - Sep 29, 2022 - 11:12am
 
Vinyl Only Spin List - kurtster - Sep 29, 2022 - 8:06am
 
What the hell OV? - oldviolin - Sep 29, 2022 - 7:57am
 
How's the weather? - Proclivities - Sep 29, 2022 - 7:10am
 
Bug Reports & Feature Requests - jarro - Sep 29, 2022 - 2:26am
 
Prog Rockers Anonymous - ianm42 - Sep 29, 2022 - 2:03am
 
They're made out of meat. - oldviolin - Sep 28, 2022 - 8:08pm
 
What Makes You Laugh? - ScottFromWyoming - Sep 28, 2022 - 8:06pm
 
Republican Party - Red_Dragon - Sep 28, 2022 - 6:50pm
 
NASA & other news from space - Red_Dragon - Sep 28, 2022 - 4:27pm
 
First Porcupine Tree Concert in Toronto - the_jake - Sep 28, 2022 - 12:21pm
 
Florida Hurricane preparedness - pilgrim - Sep 28, 2022 - 10:23am
 
The Abortion Wars - Red_Dragon - Sep 28, 2022 - 10:11am
 
Photography Forum - Your Own Photos - fractalv - Sep 28, 2022 - 8:56am
 
New RP Website! (2022) - eyke - Sep 28, 2022 - 8:47am
 
Today in History - Red_Dragon - Sep 28, 2022 - 6:56am
 
What's the first concert you ever went to? - Coaxial - Sep 28, 2022 - 5:03am
 
TEXAS - Red_Dragon - Sep 27, 2022 - 6:34pm
 
Display Album Art/Hide Slideshow - Joril - Sep 27, 2022 - 12:58am
 
Blondie in Detroit - Red_Dragon - Sep 26, 2022 - 4:38pm
 
Bob Dylan - miamizsun - Sep 26, 2022 - 3:08pm
 
• • • BRING OUT YOUR DEAD • • •  - oldviolin - Sep 26, 2022 - 1:46pm
 
HALF A WORLD - oldviolin - Sep 26, 2022 - 1:39pm
 
What the world needs now is .... - Red_Dragon - Sep 26, 2022 - 11:24am
 
China - miamizsun - Sep 26, 2022 - 7:28am
 
Really missing ABBA (not) - ColdMiser - Sep 26, 2022 - 6:59am
 
Joe Biden - VV - Sep 26, 2022 - 6:05am
 
Annoying stuff. not things that piss you off, just annoyi... - Red_Dragon - Sep 25, 2022 - 4:35pm
 
New App Changes. Can't Scroll Back On Comment Section of - Laptopdog - Sep 25, 2022 - 4:04pm
 
Art Show - Manbird - Sep 25, 2022 - 2:08pm
 
Italy - Red_Dragon - Sep 25, 2022 - 1:45pm
 
What are you listening to now? - eyke - Sep 25, 2022 - 12:45pm
 
Questions. - haresfur - Sep 25, 2022 - 12:24pm
 
Ambient Music - haresfur - Sep 25, 2022 - 12:16pm
 
Trump - westslope - Sep 25, 2022 - 11:30am
 
Judy Chops - gazweid - Sep 25, 2022 - 9:42am
 
Positive Thoughts and Prayer Requests - Red_Dragon - Sep 25, 2022 - 8:13am
 
Quick! I need a chicken... - haresfur - Sep 24, 2022 - 4:36pm
 
hey Siri, play radio paradise in the living room? - KurtfromLaQuinta - Sep 24, 2022 - 4:04pm
 
COVID-19 - nottheusualkind - Sep 23, 2022 - 9:38pm
 
RIP Barbara Billingsley - fateme.mollaei - Sep 23, 2022 - 6:40pm
 
YouTube: Music-Videos - thisbody - Sep 23, 2022 - 11:43am
 
Getting ads on Sonos Radio Paradise Plugin - scrubbrush - Sep 23, 2022 - 10:46am
 
Automotive Lust - KurtfromLaQuinta - Sep 23, 2022 - 6:14am
 
USA! USA! USA! - westslope - Sep 22, 2022 - 7:07pm
 
Pernicious Pious Proclivities Particularized Prodigiously - Red_Dragon - Sep 22, 2022 - 3:20pm
 
Climate Change - R_P - Sep 22, 2022 - 12:18pm
 
Sonos - scrubbrush - Sep 22, 2022 - 11:33am
 
Earthquake - Steely_D - Sep 22, 2022 - 9:40am
 
The Dragons' Roost - GeneP59 - Sep 22, 2022 - 6:55am
 
Anti-War - R_P - Sep 21, 2022 - 7:41pm
 
What is the meaning of this? - oldviolin - Sep 21, 2022 - 2:46pm
 
Index » Radio Paradise/General » General Discussion » Today in History Page: Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 209, 210, 211 ... 224, 225, 226  Next
Post to this Topic
ricguy

ricguy Avatar

Location: between gigs...in the OC, CA
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 22, 2013 - 7:32am

JOHN HANCOCK DAY!   now there's a signature...

 


hippiechick

hippiechick Avatar

Location: topsy turvy land
Gender: Female


Posted: Jan 22, 2013 - 7:20am

Roe v. Wade at 40: Six questions about the state of abortion rights today


Proclivities

Proclivities Avatar

Location: Paris of the Piedmont
Gender: Male


Posted: Jan 9, 2013 - 5:55am

1923 – Juan de la Cierva makes the first autogyro flight.

autogyro

Ironically, he died as a passenger in a commercial airliner crash, several years later.


Red_Dragon

Red_Dragon Avatar



Posted: Jan 8, 2013 - 10:50am

1835: The only fiscal year in American history wherein the nation debt was $0.
miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Dec 23, 2012 - 8:04am

 oldslabsides wrote:
1913: The Federal Reserve Act is signed into law by Woodrow Wilson

 
a dark, dark day

Red_Dragon

Red_Dragon Avatar



Posted: Dec 23, 2012 - 6:59am

1913: The Federal Reserve Act is signed into law by Woodrow Wilson
Isabeau

Isabeau Avatar

Location: sou' tex
Gender: Female


Posted: Dec 20, 2012 - 8:08am


Isabeau

Isabeau Avatar

Location: sou' tex
Gender: Female


Posted: Dec 20, 2012 - 8:04am

 black321 wrote:
On this day (+3) in 1931, America was spiraling into the depths of the Depression. Thousands of banks had closed and there was a national panic that more closings might be imminent. And large corporations announced huge layoff programs, stunning many who thought they were safe. Those who had a job were grateful just to be employed.

Among those were a group of construction workers in New York City. As they stood amidst the rubble of demolished buildings in midtown Manhattan, they talked of how lucky they were that some rich guy had hired them for a new but risky development. And, since it was near Christmas, they decided to celebrate the fact that they had a job.

They got a Christmas tree from a guy in a lot on the corner who apparently had discovered that folks with apartments suitable for 18 foot trees were not too free with the green pictures of dead presidents in 1931. So the workers stood the big tree up in the rubble and decorated it with tin cans and other items on the lot. A photographer saw it as a perfect symbol of 1931. It caught on immediately and each Christmas as the project proceeded a new tree was put up. And even after the project (Rockefeller Center) was completed, management put up a new (and much bigger) tree each year.

 
Nice story! {#Think} Would love to see that photo. 
black321

black321 Avatar

Location: An earth without maps
Gender: Male


Posted: Dec 20, 2012 - 7:56am

On this day (+3) in 1931, America was spiraling into the depths of the Depression. Thousands of banks had closed and there was a national panic that more closings might be imminent. And large corporations announced huge layoff programs, stunning many who thought they were safe. Those who had a job were grateful just to be employed.

Among those were a group of construction workers in New York City. As they stood amidst the rubble of demolished buildings in midtown Manhattan, they talked of how lucky they were that some rich guy had hired them for a new but risky development. And, since it was near Christmas, they decided to celebrate the fact that they had a job.

They got a Christmas tree from a guy in a lot on the corner who apparently had discovered that folks with apartments suitable for 18 foot trees were not too free with the green pictures of dead presidents in 1931. So the workers stood the big tree up in the rubble and decorated it with tin cans and other items on the lot. A photographer saw it as a perfect symbol of 1931. It caught on immediately and each Christmas as the project proceeded a new tree was put up. And even after the project (Rockefeller Center) was completed, management put up a new (and much bigger) tree each year.
Proclivities

Proclivities Avatar

Location: Paris of the Piedmont
Gender: Male


Posted: Dec 18, 2012 - 9:09am

betty

Betty Grable born, 1916.


Red_Dragon

Red_Dragon Avatar



Posted: Dec 17, 2012 - 6:54am

1903: The Wright brothers achieve powered flight.
black321

black321 Avatar

Location: An earth without maps
Gender: Male


Posted: Dec 7, 2012 - 2:04pm

On this day in 1941, the Imperial Japanese Naval Air Forces pulled off a major surgical strike (before that term became popular). In less than 110 minutes, they
severely damaged or sank eight huge battleships, three light cruisers and a score of lesser vessels. In addition, they destroyed almost 200 aircraft and killed nearly 3,000 men. And for the next five decades, American schoolboys have learned of the "surprise" attack on Pearl Harbor.

But it shouldn't have been a surprise. First, nearly 10 hours before the attack, Americans intercepted a fourteen part Japanese radio message. They managed to
decipher that by about 4:30 a.m. (Washington time). But the message stayed in the code room awaiting the arrival of the officer of the day so he could see if it was important enough to awaken the President. FDR got it at 7:30 a.m. (still plenty of time). After some discussion, it was determined by the Chief of Naval Operations to send the message to all areas of the Pacific. Because of re-encoding (so the Japanese wouldn't know we knew) the message was not sent till 11:00 a.m. (still a little time.) Out it went to everywhere but Hawaii because….the code receiver was not working. By the time it was relayed to Pearl, the "Arizona" had been on the harbor bottom for a bit over three hours.

A second reason it should not have been a surprise was a book titled "The Great Pacific War". In the book, the author predicted a Japanese "sneak attack" to destroy the American fleet. When it was published (in 1925), it was the cover feature of a New York Times Book Review. That happened to be the same year that a Japanese Ensign named Yamamoto was a Consular Aide in Washington D.C. The final reason it shouldn't have been a surprise is that it was an American idea. Ten years earlier, U.S. Adm. Harry Yarnell had tried to prove the vulnerability of Pearl Harbor. The plan he devised and demonstrated in 1932 was copied and used by the Japanese right down to the exact course that their carriers would use and the exact spot at sea for launching the planes. In a series of investigations after the war,  congressmen refused to believe the Japanese had actually used Yarnell's plan.

No wonder they were skeptical. Who ever heard of someone taking an innovative American idea, shaping it to their own designs and exploiting it against the Americans themselves.
BillJ

BillJ Avatar

Location: just far enough away from NYC
Gender: Male


Posted: Dec 7, 2012 - 2:01pm


mzpro5

mzpro5 Avatar

Location: Budda'spet, Hungry
Gender: Male


Posted: Dec 6, 2012 - 5:30am

This date in 1923 was the first time a Presidential speech was broadcast to the nation via radio. Calvin Coolidge speaking to a joint session of Congress.


Proclivities

Proclivities Avatar

Location: Paris of the Piedmont
Gender: Male


Posted: Dec 5, 2012 - 12:01pm

 black321 wrote:
Jumping the gun on this one...Hoping to cheer up a nation slipping into a Depression, Coca-Cola hired an advertising artist to paint them a cheerful Santa for a fun and festive holiday promotion. The artist thought that Santa's outfit should not clash with the Coke sign, so he used the same colors – red and white. Thus, Santa had a bright red coat, trimmed in snow white fur that matched his snow white beard. At last the current image was complete as Coca-Cola flashed the ads around the globe...
 
Interesting origins regarding the feast of St. Nicholas, but with hints at one slight, urban myth: Apparently, Thomas Nast had portrayed Santa Claus in the red and white attire, in a book published around 1890.  The legendary (among illustrators) Haddon Sundblom's famous illustrations for Coca Cola (starting in 1931) were apparently inspired by Nast's works, and not dictated by the client's product colors.


black321

black321 Avatar

Location: An earth without maps
Gender: Male


Posted: Dec 5, 2012 - 8:27am

Jumping the gun on this one...

On this day (+1), which would be December 6th if you have a graduate degree, in about 705 A.D., the Nordic tribes of Europe, recently converted to Christianity, began to adopt a theologically un-definable affection to an Archbishop who had existed three centuries before in an area east of Greece. Legend says he was as wise as they come. And, certainly he was devout. But was that enough to make him a big hit? He did have the added benefits of being the designated patron saint of scholars (ain't we all); merchants (a popular Nordic pastime); sailors (the other Viking pastime) and children. He had gained the latter role
through the legend that he had saved three dowry-less young girls by dropping jewels into their home through an open window.

So, over the next thousand years, these Nordic tribes would recall his love of children and his generosity by giving gifts to their children and the poor on St. Nick's feast day – December 6th. When the Dutch came to America, they brought their gift-giving "Sinte Klaus" with them. America moved the day to Christmas and mispronounced his name to Santa Claus.

Of course, by this time Nordic and American winters had made open windows rather impractical in December. So the chimney became the logical point of entry. And, since cold floors tended to make you reach for your stockings (hung to dry by the fire), they became the logical place to hide the jewels (gifts).
Santa's American evolution from an affable Archbishop to the rotund old elf we know today came with the assistance of a lot of helpers.
First among these is probably Washington Irving the creator of Rip Van Winkle, the Headless Horseman and a variety of stories around the early Dutch settlers. Irving took Sinte Klaus out of his clerical robes and dressed him in the long wool coats favored by the early Dutch burghers around Sleepy Hollow.

Then, around 1822, a classical language scholar, Clement Clark Moore, wrote a poem for his children, which he called – A Visit From St. Nicholas (it quickly became known by its first line – "T'was the night before Christmas"). Moore tried to keep the poem private but his wife mailed it to many friends and the poem and its Jolly Old Elf image swept the new nation.

During the Civil War, Harpers Weekly asked the budding political cartoonist, Thomas Nast, to give them a Christmas image. Nast drew Santa visiting Union troops at the front lines. Nast's first Santa had a certain "Uncle Sam" look about him and was garbed in stars and stripes. In succeeding years, Nast mellowed the image and it became more like the portrayal in Moore's poem.

Then came a rather critical year in the evolution of Christmas and Santa. It was 1931 and it would see the first Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree. (A rather ragtag version, erected and decorated by the grateful construction workers building Rockefeller Center.) 

Hoping to cheer up a nation slipping into a Depression, Coca-Cola hired an advertising artist to paint them a cheerful Santa for a fun and festive holiday promotion. The artist thought that Santa's outfit should not clash with the Coke sign, so he used the same colors – red and white. Thus, Santa had a bright red coat, trimmed in snow white fur that matched his snow white beard. At last the current image was complete as Coca-Cola flashed the ads around the globe.

To prepare for the feast of good old St. Nick, go to the Rooftop Inn and sip enough well-laced eggnog to make your nose look like Rudolph's. But don't get out of line or they'll put coal in your stocking.

hippiechick

hippiechick Avatar

Location: topsy turvy land
Gender: Female


Posted: Dec 5, 2012 - 7:49am

Five interesting facts about Prohibition’s end in 1933


hippiechick

hippiechick Avatar

Location: topsy turvy land
Gender: Female


Posted: Dec 5, 2012 - 7:41am

 mzpro5 wrote:
raise a glass and celebrate Repeal Day! Prohibition (21st amendment) was repealed on Dec. 5, 1933
 

Happy birthday, 21st Amendment!

 

Proclivities

Proclivities Avatar

Location: Paris of the Piedmont
Gender: Male


Posted: Dec 5, 2012 - 6:36am

 mzpro5 wrote:
raise a glass and celebrate Repeal Day! Prohibition (21st amendment) was repealed on Dec. 5, 1933
 
cart
mzpro5

mzpro5 Avatar

Location: Budda'spet, Hungry
Gender: Male


Posted: Dec 5, 2012 - 6:17am


Raise a glass and celebrate Repeal Day! Prohibition (21st amendment) was repealed on Dec. 5, 1933

{#Cheers}
Page: Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 209, 210, 211 ... 224, 225, 226  Next