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RightWingNutZ - R_P - Nov 26, 2022 - 1:48pm
 
The Obituary Page - ScottFromWyoming - Nov 26, 2022 - 1:26pm
 
Ukraine - R_P - Nov 26, 2022 - 1:24pm
 
Your Handy Home Censorship Kit - Manbird - Nov 26, 2022 - 1:05pm
 
NEED A COMPUTER GEEK! - ScottFromWyoming - Nov 26, 2022 - 12:22pm
 
Bug Reports & Feature Requests - miamizsun - Nov 26, 2022 - 11:06am
 
Radio Paradise Comments - miamizsun - Nov 26, 2022 - 10:52am
 
COVID-19 - sirdroseph - Nov 26, 2022 - 10:35am
 
Wordle - daily game - maryte - Nov 26, 2022 - 9:37am
 
Name My Band - oldviolin - Nov 26, 2022 - 7:49am
 
New RP Website! (2022) - Steve - Nov 26, 2022 - 7:32am
 
Is there any DOG news out there? - MrsHobieJoe - Nov 26, 2022 - 6:50am
 
Counting with Pictures - Proclivities - Nov 26, 2022 - 5:59am
 
Take Me To Your Leader - sirdroseph - Nov 26, 2022 - 5:24am
 
Canada - sirdroseph - Nov 26, 2022 - 4:02am
 
Democratic Party - sirdroseph - Nov 26, 2022 - 3:55am
 
Trump - kurtster - Nov 25, 2022 - 11:31pm
 
♥ ♥ ♥ Vote For Pie ♥ ♥ ♥ - oldviolin - Nov 25, 2022 - 9:21pm
 
New Music - KurtfromLaQuinta - Nov 25, 2022 - 8:17pm
 
Porcupine Tree -- In Absentia and some early history - Tim55 - Nov 25, 2022 - 6:18pm
 
Today in History - phineas - Nov 25, 2022 - 5:22pm
 
Russia - R_P - Nov 25, 2022 - 5:21pm
 
How to submit songs for consideration? - garrettb - Nov 25, 2022 - 2:51pm
 
Automobile Repair - Manbird - Nov 25, 2022 - 2:33pm
 
Favorite Quotes - RedTopFireBelow - Nov 25, 2022 - 10:48am
 
Twitter and democracy - thisbody - Nov 25, 2022 - 9:07am
 
Radio Paradise NFL Pick'em Group - islander - Nov 25, 2022 - 8:26am
 
Mixtape Culture Club - miamizsun - Nov 25, 2022 - 7:17am
 
What Makes You Laugh? - Steely_D - Nov 25, 2022 - 6:16am
 
260,000 Posts in one thread? - oldviolin - Nov 24, 2022 - 6:34pm
 
Happy Thanksgiving! - islander - Nov 24, 2022 - 5:47pm
 
Graphic designers, ho's! - Manbird - Nov 24, 2022 - 2:05pm
 
Feminism: Catch the (Third?) Wave! - sirdroseph - Nov 24, 2022 - 6:01am
 
What is the meaning of this? - oldviolin - Nov 23, 2022 - 9:07pm
 
Manbird's Episiotomy Stitch Licking Clinic - KEEP OUT - oldviolin - Nov 23, 2022 - 6:15pm
 
Guns - kurtster - Nov 23, 2022 - 10:15am
 
Science Fiction Cliches come to life - GeneP59 - Nov 23, 2022 - 9:09am
 
2024 Elections! - Red_Dragon - Nov 23, 2022 - 7:02am
 
Things I Saw Today... - KurtfromLaQuinta - Nov 23, 2022 - 6:53am
 
Important if you have small children - sirdroseph - Nov 23, 2022 - 3:51am
 
YouTube: Music-Videos - Steely_D - Nov 22, 2022 - 8:38pm
 
Things You Thought Today - Steely_D - Nov 22, 2022 - 8:37pm
 
comedian/blogger is very, very bad - MayBaby - Nov 22, 2022 - 6:20pm
 
Covers! - Manbird - Nov 22, 2022 - 2:03pm
 
Twitter's finest moment - thisbody - Nov 22, 2022 - 1:42pm
 
RP Song Comment Hall of Fame - Proclivities - Nov 22, 2022 - 12:43pm
 
• • • The Once-a-Day • • •  - oldviolin - Nov 22, 2022 - 11:37am
 
Climate Change - Red_Dragon - Nov 22, 2022 - 6:59am
 
RP Team - thisbody - Nov 21, 2022 - 1:00pm
 
Live Music - oldviolin - Nov 21, 2022 - 10:59am
 
Songs that do not sound like artist - Steely_D - Nov 21, 2022 - 7:10am
 
RP App for Android - krilok - Nov 21, 2022 - 5:39am
 
~*Funny Cats*~ - kurtster - Nov 20, 2022 - 10:46pm
 
Philosophy (Meaty Metaphysical Munchables!) - oldviolin - Nov 20, 2022 - 7:33pm
 
Vinyl Only Spin List - kurtster - Nov 20, 2022 - 7:26pm
 
What makes you smile? - Antigone - Nov 20, 2022 - 3:50pm
 
Oh GOD, they're GAY! - R_P - Nov 20, 2022 - 1:07pm
 
Republican Party - Steely_D - Nov 20, 2022 - 12:38pm
 
Marijuana: Baked News. - thisbody - Nov 20, 2022 - 11:40am
 
Play the Blues - thisbody - Nov 20, 2022 - 10:37am
 
Back to the 60's - thisbody - Nov 20, 2022 - 10:28am
 
Eclectic Sound-Drops - thisbody - Nov 20, 2022 - 10:06am
 
Derplahoma! - Red_Dragon - Nov 20, 2022 - 10:06am
 
Amazing animals! - thisbody - Nov 20, 2022 - 8:20am
 
Photography Forum - Your Own Photos - thisbody - Nov 20, 2022 - 8:18am
 
Art Show - Red_Dragon - Nov 20, 2022 - 6:50am
 
Background sounds (i.e. bells and whistles) - oldviolin - Nov 19, 2022 - 5:28pm
 
Favorite Color - Bill_J - Nov 19, 2022 - 4:49pm
 
Pernicious Pious Proclivities Particularized Prodigiously - Red_Dragon - Nov 19, 2022 - 3:15pm
 
New Profile Page! - Laptopdog - Nov 18, 2022 - 6:17pm
 
• • • BRING OUT YOUR DEAD • • •  - oldviolin - Nov 18, 2022 - 3:51pm
 
Joe Biden - R_P - Nov 18, 2022 - 12:24pm
 
Pink Floyd Set? - black321 - Nov 18, 2022 - 11:58am
 
The War On You - sirdroseph - Nov 18, 2022 - 10:40am
 
New Study Finds 'Most Narcissistic Generation' on Campuse... - sirdroseph - Nov 18, 2022 - 10:22am
 
Index » Radio Paradise/General » General Discussion » Climate Change Page: 1, 2, 3 ... 115, 116, 117  Next
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Red_Dragon

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Posted: Nov 22, 2022 - 6:59am

Village in French Alps demolishes its ski lift because there's no snow left
sirdroseph

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Location: Not here, I tell you wat
Gender: Male


Posted: Nov 20, 2022 - 6:31am

ColdMiser

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Location: On the Trail
Gender: Male


Posted: Nov 17, 2022 - 7:03am

 black321 wrote:

How a sand battery could transform clean energy

A new way of storing renewable energy is providing clean heat through the long Nordic nights.

At the end of a winding, tree-lined country road in western Finland, four young engineers believe they have a possible answer to one of green energy's biggest challenges.

The challenge is how to provide a year-round, steady power supply from renewable energy during changing seasons and variable weather conditions. The answer nestling in Vatajankoski power plant, 270 km (168 miles) north-west of Finland's capital, Helsinki, is remarkably simple, abundant and cheap: sand.

The Vatajankoski power plant is home to the world's first commercial-scale sand battery. Fully enclosed in a 7m (23ft)-high steel container, the battery consists of 100 tonnes of low-grade builders' sand, two district heating pipes and a fan. The sand becomes a battery after it is heated up to 600C using electricity generated by wind turbines and solar panels in Finland, brought by Vatajankoski, the owners of the power plant.

The renewable energy powers a resistance heater which heats up the air inside the sand. Inside the battery, this hot air is circulated by a fan around the sand through heat exchange pipes.

Thick insulation surrounds the sand, keeping the temperature inside the battery at 600C (1,112F), even when it is freezing outside. "We don't want to lose any heat; the average winter temperature is below 0C (32F) in Kankanpää," says Ville Kivioja, lead scientist at Polar Night Energy, who monitors the battery's performance online.

The battery stores 8 MWh of thermal energy when full. When energy demand rises, the battery discharges about 200 kW of power through the heat-exchange pipes: that's enough to provide heating and hot water for about 100 homes and a public swimming pool in Kankaanpää, supplementing power from the grid. The battery is charged overnight when the electricity prices are lower.

https://www.bbc.com/future/art...







just goes to show what kind of innovative thinking we are capable of. wonder how they could bring something like this to scale.
Red_Dragon

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Posted: Nov 16, 2022 - 4:01pm

 black321 wrote:

How a sand battery could transform clean energy

A new way of storing renewable energy is providing clean heat through the long Nordic nights.

At the end of a winding, tree-lined country road in western Finland, four young engineers believe they have a possible answer to one of green energy's biggest challenges.

The challenge is how to provide a year-round, steady power supply from renewable energy during changing seasons and variable weather conditions. The answer nestling in Vatajankoski power plant, 270 km (168 miles) north-west of Finland's capital, Helsinki, is remarkably simple, abundant and cheap: sand.

The Vatajankoski power plant is home to the world's first commercial-scale sand battery. Fully enclosed in a 7m (23ft)-high steel container, the battery consists of 100 tonnes of low-grade builders' sand, two district heating pipes and a fan. The sand becomes a battery after it is heated up to 600C using electricity generated by wind turbines and solar panels in Finland, brought by Vatajankoski, the owners of the power plant.

The renewable energy powers a resistance heater which heats up the air inside the sand. Inside the battery, this hot air is circulated by a fan around the sand through heat exchange pipes.

Thick insulation surrounds the sand, keeping the temperature inside the battery at 600C (1,112F), even when it is freezing outside. "We don't want to lose any heat; the average winter temperature is below 0C (32F) in Kankanpää," says Ville Kivioja, lead scientist at Polar Night Energy, who monitors the battery's performance online.

The battery stores 8 MWh of thermal energy when full. When energy demand rises, the battery discharges about 200 kW of power through the heat-exchange pipes: that's enough to provide heating and hot water for about 100 homes and a public swimming pool in Kankaanpää, supplementing power from the grid. The battery is charged overnight when the electricity prices are lower.

https://www.bbc.com/future/art...






Very cool.
black321

black321 Avatar

Location: An earth without maps
Gender: Male


Posted: Nov 16, 2022 - 11:15am

How a sand battery could transform clean energy

A new way of storing renewable energy is providing clean heat through the long Nordic nights.

At the end of a winding, tree-lined country road in western Finland, four young engineers believe they have a possible answer to one of green energy's biggest challenges.

The challenge is how to provide a year-round, steady power supply from renewable energy during changing seasons and variable weather conditions. The answer nestling in Vatajankoski power plant, 270 km (168 miles) north-west of Finland's capital, Helsinki, is remarkably simple, abundant and cheap: sand.

The Vatajankoski power plant is home to the world's first commercial-scale sand battery. Fully enclosed in a 7m (23ft)-high steel container, the battery consists of 100 tonnes of low-grade builders' sand, two district heating pipes and a fan. The sand becomes a battery after it is heated up to 600C using electricity generated by wind turbines and solar panels in Finland, brought by Vatajankoski, the owners of the power plant.

The renewable energy powers a resistance heater which heats up the air inside the sand. Inside the battery, this hot air is circulated by a fan around the sand through heat exchange pipes.

Thick insulation surrounds the sand, keeping the temperature inside the battery at 600C (1,112F), even when it is freezing outside. "We don't want to lose any heat; the average winter temperature is below 0C (32F) in Kankanpää," says Ville Kivioja, lead scientist at Polar Night Energy, who monitors the battery's performance online.

The battery stores 8 MWh of thermal energy when full. When energy demand rises, the battery discharges about 200 kW of power through the heat-exchange pipes: that's enough to provide heating and hot water for about 100 homes and a public swimming pool in Kankaanpää, supplementing power from the grid. The battery is charged overnight when the electricity prices are lower.

https://www.bbc.com/future/art...




R_P

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Posted: Nov 8, 2022 - 10:32am

Draft Report Offers Starkest View Yet of U.S. Climate Threats
The draft of the National Climate Assessment, the government’s premier contribution to climate knowledge, provides the most detailed look yet at the consequences of global warming for the United States, both in the present and in the future. The final report isn’t scheduled to be published until late 2023, but the 13 federal agencies and hundreds of scientists who are compiling the assessment issued a 1,695-page draft for public comment on Monday.“

The things Americans value most are at risk,” says the draft report, which could still undergo changes as it goes through the review process. “More intense extreme events and long-term climate changes make it harder to maintain safe homes and healthy families, reliable public services, a sustainable economy, thriving ecosystems and strong communities.” (...)

Under a law passed by Congress in 1990, the federal government is required to release the National Climate Assessment every four years, with contributions from a range of scientists across federal agencies as well as outside experts. The last assessment, released in 2018, found that unchecked warming could cause significant damage to the U.S. economy.

The Trump administration tried, but largely failed, to halt work on the next report, and its release was pushed back to 2023. (...)

R_P

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Posted: Oct 4, 2022 - 10:30am

 westslope wrote:
Jeff Currie, Goldman Sachs on CNBC

"At the end of last year, overall fossil fuels represented 81% of energy consumption. 10 years ago, they were at 82%," says Jeff Currie. "$3.8 trillion of investment in renewables moved fossil fuels from 82% to 81% of the overall energy consumption."

https://twitter.com/SquawkCNBC...

A decade vs. a year...
Globally, fossil fuel subsidies were $5.9 trillion or 6.8 percent of GDP in 2020 and are expected to increase to 7.4 percent of GDP in 2025 (...)

westslope

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Location: BC sage brush steppe


Posted: Oct 4, 2022 - 9:49am


Jeff Currie, Goldman Sachs on CNBC

"At the end of last year, overall fossil fuels represented 81% of energy consumption. 10 years ago, they were at 82%," says Jeff Currie. "$3.8 trillion of investment in renewables moved fossil fuels from 82% to 81% of the overall energy consumption."

https://twitter.com/SquawkCNBC...


R_P

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Posted: Sep 22, 2022 - 12:18pm

“I’m not a scientist,” he said.
R_P

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Posted: Sep 13, 2022 - 11:05am

The 7 climate tipping points that could change the world forever
As the world warms, these Earth systems are changing. Could further warming make them spiral out of control?

Coaxial

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Location: 543westofParadis,1491east ofParadise
Gender: Male


Posted: Sep 5, 2022 - 7:43pm

 Manbird wrote:
Tomorrow - my birthday huzzah! - is supposed to be the hottest day of the year here in Drugsville: 112˚ Fahrenheit. 
 

via GIPHY

Manbird

Manbird Avatar

Location: Owl Creek Bridge
Gender: Male


Posted: Sep 5, 2022 - 7:41pm

 oldviolin wrote:

I wish I could be there to fry your egg head on a rock and pull your tail! Happy Birthday Eve there mister!


zim zam zamoo!




























(the voice came out of a kangaroo)
oldviolin

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Location: esse quam videri
Gender: Male


Posted: Sep 5, 2022 - 7:00pm

 Manbird wrote:
Tomorrow - my birthday huzzah! - is supposed to be the hottest day of the year here in Drugsville: 112˚ Fahrenheit. 
 
I wish I could be there to fry your egg head on a rock and pull your tail! Happy Birthday Eve there mister!
Red_Dragon

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Posted: Sep 5, 2022 - 3:47pm

 Manbird wrote:

Tomorrow - my birthday huzzah! - is supposed to be the hottest day of the year here in Drugsville: 112˚ Fahrenheit. 



whee!
Manbird

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Location: Owl Creek Bridge
Gender: Male


Posted: Sep 5, 2022 - 3:45pm

Tomorrow - my birthday huzzah! - is supposed to be the hottest day of the year here in Drugsville: 112˚ Fahrenheit. 
R_P

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Posted: Sep 2, 2022 - 10:49am

First came the heatwaves, then the floods: Why Pakistan is on the frontline of the climate crisis
“Literally a third of the country is under water,” Pakistan’s Climate Change Minister Sherry Rehman warned this week, after the death toll from the nation’s devastating floods topped 1,100 after record monsoon rains. The torrential downpours come after a series of heat waves, highlighting Pakistan’s vulnerability to climate change.

Since early June, Pakistan has been the victim of flood after flood: from the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province in the Himalayan foothills, to the arid regions of Balochistan and Sindh in the south, riverbanks have burst and destroyed houses, roads and bridges. Thousands of people have been forced to flee their homes.

Climate Change Minister Rehman described it as a “crisis of unimaginable proportions”, telling AFP news agency that "it's all one big ocean, there's no dry land to pump the water out".

haresfur

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Location: The Golden Triangle
Gender: Male


Posted: Sep 1, 2022 - 2:15pm

 rgio wrote:

Why Do Some People in New Jersey Suddenly Have Bags and Bags of Bags?

A ban on single-use plastic and paper bags in grocery stores had an unintended effect: Delivery services switched to heavy, reusable sacks — lots of them.

Nicole Kramaritsch of Roxbury, N.J., has 46 bags just sitting in her garage. Brian Otto has 101 of them, so many that he’s considering sewing them into blackout curtains for his baby’s bedroom. (So far, that idea has gone nowhere.) Lili Mannuzza in Whippany has 74.

“I don’t know what to do with all these bags,” she said.

The mountains of bags are an unintended consequence of New Jersey’s strict new bag ban in supermarkets. It went into effect in May and prohibits not only plastic bags but paper bags as well. The well-intentioned law seeks to cut down on waste and single-use plastics, but for many people who rely on grocery delivery and curbside pickup services their orders now come in heavy-duty reusable shopping bags — lots and lots of them, week after week.

While nearly a dozen states nationwide have implemented restrictions on single-use plastic bags, New Jersey is the only one to ban paper bags because of their environmental impact. The law also bans polystyrene foam food containers and cups, and restricts restaurants from handing out plastic straws unless they’re requested.

Sign up for the Climate Forward newsletter  Your must-read guide to the climate crisis.

Emily Gonyou, 22, a gig worker in Roselle Park who provides shopping services for people through Instacart, said she was surprised when she learned the delivery company had no special plans for accommodating the ban. “They pretty much said, ‘OK, do exactly what you’re doing, but with reusable bags,’” she said.

Compared to single-use plastics, the more durable reusable bags are better for the environment only if they are actually reused. According to Shelie Miller, a professor at the University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability, a typical reusable bag, manufactured from polypropylene, must be used at least 10 times to account for the additional energy and material required to make it. For cotton totes, that number is much higher.

The goal of bag bans is to reduce reliance on single-use plastics like the thin bags that became ubiquitous decades ago and which are manufactured from fossil fuels and can take many lifetimes to degrade in a landfill. Many, of course, don’t make it to landfills at all, but get swept away in the wind and end up stuck and flapping in tree branches, or else they pollute waterways and oceans. Paper bags are sometimes seen as an eco-friendly alternative because they are more recyclable and made from trees, a renewable resource, yet they take significantly more energy to produce.

The ban in New Jersey, which applies to grocery stores 2,500 square feet or bigger, is meant to encourage in-store shoppers to skip single-use plastic and paper entirely, and instead bring their own reusable bags.

But that, of course, doesn’t work for most online orders.

In the past three years or so, the nation has seen a major uptick in online grocery shopping. While some of those people have returned to in-person shopping as pandemic restrictions have eased, others formed a new habit. About 6 percent of food and beverage sales are online, according to an executive at Coresight Research, a retail advisory firm.

“There’s clearly a hiccup on this,” said Bob Smith, a New Jersey state senator and co-sponsor of the bill, “and we’re going to solve it.” Mr. Smith said that the legislature would most likely create an exception by amending the rule to allow paper bags for online orders.

A spokeswoman from Instacart said the company was making sure it was complying with state laws and was choosing the most cost-effective reusable bag option for their customers...




Or the delivery companies could pick up bags from the customers and, like, reuse them
rgio

rgio Avatar

Location: West Jersey
Gender: Male


Posted: Sep 1, 2022 - 6:27am

Why Do Some People in New Jersey Suddenly Have Bags and Bags of Bags?

A ban on single-use plastic and paper bags in grocery stores had an unintended effect: Delivery services switched to heavy, reusable sacks — lots of them.

Nicole Kramaritsch of Roxbury, N.J., has 46 bags just sitting in her garage. Brian Otto has 101 of them, so many that he’s considering sewing them into blackout curtains for his baby’s bedroom. (So far, that idea has gone nowhere.) Lili Mannuzza in Whippany has 74.

“I don’t know what to do with all these bags,” she said.

The mountains of bags are an unintended consequence of New Jersey’s strict new bag ban in supermarkets. It went into effect in May and prohibits not only plastic bags but paper bags as well. The well-intentioned law seeks to cut down on waste and single-use plastics, but for many people who rely on grocery delivery and curbside pickup services their orders now come in heavy-duty reusable shopping bags — lots and lots of them, week after week.

While nearly a dozen states nationwide have implemented restrictions on single-use plastic bags, New Jersey is the only one to ban paper bags because of their environmental impact. The law also bans polystyrene foam food containers and cups, and restricts restaurants from handing out plastic straws unless they’re requested.

Sign up for the Climate Forward newsletter  Your must-read guide to the climate crisis.

Emily Gonyou, 22, a gig worker in Roselle Park who provides shopping services for people through Instacart, said she was surprised when she learned the delivery company had no special plans for accommodating the ban. “They pretty much said, ‘OK, do exactly what you’re doing, but with reusable bags,’” she said.

Compared to single-use plastics, the more durable reusable bags are better for the environment only if they are actually reused. According to Shelie Miller, a professor at the University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability, a typical reusable bag, manufactured from polypropylene, must be used at least 10 times to account for the additional energy and material required to make it. For cotton totes, that number is much higher.

The goal of bag bans is to reduce reliance on single-use plastics like the thin bags that became ubiquitous decades ago and which are manufactured from fossil fuels and can take many lifetimes to degrade in a landfill. Many, of course, don’t make it to landfills at all, but get swept away in the wind and end up stuck and flapping in tree branches, or else they pollute waterways and oceans. Paper bags are sometimes seen as an eco-friendly alternative because they are more recyclable and made from trees, a renewable resource, yet they take significantly more energy to produce.

The ban in New Jersey, which applies to grocery stores 2,500 square feet or bigger, is meant to encourage in-store shoppers to skip single-use plastic and paper entirely, and instead bring their own reusable bags.

But that, of course, doesn’t work for most online orders.

In the past three years or so, the nation has seen a major uptick in online grocery shopping. While some of those people have returned to in-person shopping as pandemic restrictions have eased, others formed a new habit. About 6 percent of food and beverage sales are online, according to an executive at Coresight Research, a retail advisory firm.

“There’s clearly a hiccup on this,” said Bob Smith, a New Jersey state senator and co-sponsor of the bill, “and we’re going to solve it.” Mr. Smith said that the legislature would most likely create an exception by amending the rule to allow paper bags for online orders.

A spokeswoman from Instacart said the company was making sure it was complying with state laws and was choosing the most cost-effective reusable bag option for their customers...


Red_Dragon

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Posted: Aug 29, 2022 - 1:18pm

Major sea-level rise caused by melting of Greenland ice cap is ‘now inevitable’
R_P

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Posted: Aug 28, 2022 - 11:03am

How climate change spurs megadroughts
Page: 1, 2, 3 ... 115, 116, 117  Next