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Race in America - westslope - Nov 25, 2021 - 9:07am
 
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Genesis Tour 2021 - miamizsun - Nov 18, 2021 - 1:19pm
 
Signs o' the Apocalypse in the news... - ScottFromWyoming - Nov 18, 2021 - 9:41am
 
Joe Biden - Red_Dragon - Nov 18, 2021 - 9:37am
 
Index » Regional/Local » USA/Canada » Race in America Page: 1, 2, 3 ... 66, 67, 68  Next
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westslope

westslope Avatar

Location: BC sage brush steppe


Posted: Nov 25, 2021 - 9:07am

 kurtster wrote:

It seems imo, that the right verdicts came down in the Aubrey case and the system can still work properly.


After the defence lawyers managed to eliminate all but one Black juror.  

These defendants are going to be expensive to lock up.  But seeing how they are white, I blithely assume that no expense will be spared.  Extra-judicial punishment is part of the culture.

kurtster

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Location: where fear is not a virtue
Gender: Male


Posted: Nov 24, 2021 - 3:44pm

It seems imo, that the right verdicts came down in the Aubrey case and the system can still work properly.
R_P

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Posted: Nov 24, 2021 - 2:33pm

Allegations of racism and intentional bias surrounded the court case throughout.

Lawyers acting for the Arbery family had expressed significant concerns at the trial’s outset after a jury of 11 white members and one Black member was selected. Defense lawyers had struck all but one potential Black juror from the jury pool, leading judge Walmsley to declare there appeared to be “intentional discrimination” during the selection process.

Defense attorneys repeatedly requested a mistrial due to activists congregating outside the Glynn county courthouse and also requested that the judge limit the number of Black pastors in the public viewing space, claiming the pastors were intimidating to the jury.

In closing, lawyers for each defendant also sought to attack Arbery himself, claiming his decisions had ultimately led to the fatal shooting.

Laura Hogue, representing Greg McMichael, described Arbery during closing arguments as a “recurring night-time intruder” whose presence was “frightening and unsettling”, prompting instant criticism from Arbery’s parents, who said the defense had deliberately mischaracterized their son.

Reports indicated both McMichaels planned to appeal Wednesday’s verdict.
How the murder of Ahmaud Arbery further exposes America’s broken and racist legal system

R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Nov 22, 2021 - 11:07am

 miamizsun wrote:
his psychic powers/spidey sense may be telling him that, not sure if it makes it true
also he's not aware of the nfac
i think they've had many marches with open carry

There's safety in numbers, but that's not what he's talking about. Maybe he's not a (Black) nationalist either.

BYOM (Bring Your Own Militia)
miamizsun

miamizsun Avatar

Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Nov 22, 2021 - 4:30am

 R_P wrote:
“I don’t think the kid was a Klan member,” Raymond Roberts, a local data analyst and activist, said of Mr. Rittenhouse. “It was just the privilege of it: ‘Because I’m white, I can walk around in tac gear with a rifle, and the police will say thank you.’”

In June 2020, Mr. Roberts, who is Black and an Army veteran, had organized an armed demonstration to counter Mr. Mathewson’s Kenosha Guard, calling on fellow veterans to openly carry firearms in solidarity with racial justice demonstrators. But at the event, Mr. Roberts had chosen to carry a permitted concealed handgun rather than a rifle — a common choice among local racial justice activists who armed themselves at demonstrations in Kenosha that summer.

To Mr. Roberts, the Rittenhouse verdict was a stark reminder of who was likely to be seen by the police and jury members as “helping” in a situation like the one Mr. Rittenhouse placed himself in, and who was not. “I have to be honest and say I’m angry because I’m jealous,” he said.

“That 17-year-old white boy, this country belongs to him more than it’ll ever belong to me. It doesn’t matter how many years I did in the Army, how much taxes I pay. I can’t do what he did. I can’t walk around in the middle of the night open carrying,” Mr. Roberts said.

Mr. Kennedy, the alderman, who is also Black and an Army veteran, agreed. If he had been in Mr. Rittenhouse’s situation, “My ass would’ve been dead on the street,” he said. “I wouldn’t have been arrested.”



his psychic powers/spidey sense may be telling him that, not sure if it makes it true
also he's not aware of the nfac
i think they've had many marches with open carry


Red_Dragon

Red_Dragon Avatar



Posted: Nov 21, 2021 - 6:28pm

 R_P wrote:
“I don’t think the kid was a Klan member,” Raymond Roberts, a local data analyst and activist, said of Mr. Rittenhouse. “It was just the privilege of it: ‘Because I’m white, I can walk around in tac gear with a rifle, and the police will say thank you.’”

In June 2020, Mr. Roberts, who is Black and an Army veteran, had organized an armed demonstration to counter Mr. Mathewson’s Kenosha Guard, calling on fellow veterans to openly carry firearms in solidarity with racial justice demonstrators. But at the event, Mr. Roberts had chosen to carry a permitted concealed handgun rather than a rifle — a common choice among local racial justice activists who armed themselves at demonstrations in Kenosha that summer.

To Mr. Roberts, the Rittenhouse verdict was a stark reminder of who was likely to be seen by the police and jury members as “helping” in a situation like the one Mr. Rittenhouse placed himself in, and who was not. “I have to be honest and say I’m angry because I’m jealous,” he said.

“That 17-year-old white boy, this country belongs to him more than it’ll ever belong to me. It doesn’t matter how many years I did in the Army, how much taxes I pay. I can’t do what he did. I can’t walk around in the middle of the night open carrying,” Mr. Roberts said.

Mr. Kennedy, the alderman, who is also Black and an Army veteran, agreed. If he had been in Mr. Rittenhouse’s situation, “My ass would’ve been dead on the street,” he said. “I wouldn’t have been arrested.”



ayup.
R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Nov 21, 2021 - 6:21pm

“I don’t think the kid was a Klan member,” Raymond Roberts, a local data analyst and activist, said of Mr. Rittenhouse. “It was just the privilege of it: ‘Because I’m white, I can walk around in tac gear with a rifle, and the police will say thank you.’”

In June 2020, Mr. Roberts, who is Black and an Army veteran, had organized an armed demonstration to counter Mr. Mathewson’s Kenosha Guard, calling on fellow veterans to openly carry firearms in solidarity with racial justice demonstrators. But at the event, Mr. Roberts had chosen to carry a permitted concealed handgun rather than a rifle — a common choice among local racial justice activists who armed themselves at demonstrations in Kenosha that summer.

To Mr. Roberts, the Rittenhouse verdict was a stark reminder of who was likely to be seen by the police and jury members as “helping” in a situation like the one Mr. Rittenhouse placed himself in, and who was not. “I have to be honest and say I’m angry because I’m jealous,” he said.

“That 17-year-old white boy, this country belongs to him more than it’ll ever belong to me. It doesn’t matter how many years I did in the Army, how much taxes I pay. I can’t do what he did. I can’t walk around in the middle of the night open carrying,” Mr. Roberts said.

Mr. Kennedy, the alderman, who is also Black and an Army veteran, agreed. If he had been in Mr. Rittenhouse’s situation, “My ass would’ve been dead on the street,” he said. “I wouldn’t have been arrested.”

R_P

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Posted: Nov 11, 2021 - 10:18am

But because of its petit power, this small word was a prime candidate for co-option, for being turned against the people who used it. The opponents of wokeness — whether they be conservatives who believe it injures the ideal of America as inherently good, or moderate Democrats worried that it handicaps their electoral prospects — want to kill it.

Republicans want to recast “wokeness” as progressive politics run amok, and many establishment Democrats shrink from the term because they either believe that Republicans have succeeded at the task, or, of even more concern, they agree with those Republicans.

Being awake to and aware of how our systems of power operate creates enemies across the political spectrum because the wokeness indicts both  Republicans and Democrats alike. Wokeness indicts the status quo.

And so, wokeness has been referred to in the most hyperbolic language imaginable, from ideology to religion to cult. It has been so derided and adulterated that young people who are what one would have called woke five years ago no longer even use the term.

R_P

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Posted: Nov 7, 2021 - 10:26am

The Ghost of Hendrix, and Fans Who Think I’m White
Mr. Morello has spent over three decades melding music and political activism as a power guitarist with Rage Against the Machine, Audioslave and Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band, with the acoustic chords of the Nightwatchman and in protests around the country.
In 1965, I literally integrated the town of Libertyville, Ill., at least according to the real estate agent who helped my mom and me find our first apartment.

My Irish-Italian mom had excellent teaching credentials, but the school boards in Northern Illinois made clear that while as a single mother she was welcome to teach in their town, we would have to live elsewhere because we were an interracial family.

I was the interracial part, as my dad is from Kenya. Libertyville, however, was willing to give my mom a shot, with the caveat that the residents of the apartment complex across the street from the school approved. Our helpful real estate agent assured the neighbors that this was no ordinary 1-year-old “Negro” child entering their building, but rather an exotic East African princeling. This false tale haunted me throughout my youth, but it gave my mom and me a toehold among the locals.

The ruse worked until I was old enough to date their daughters, and then every Midwestern dad in sight could have cared less if I was the King of Zambia, there was no way he was going to let me cross the welcome mat on Homecoming Night.

The issue of race was omnipresent throughout my youth. My grounding in activism began not from reading Chomsky or Zinn but from mixing it up on the playground at age 5. In day care there was this much older kid who every day would attack me and call me all the names you might imagine one might call the only Black kid in town. So I’d go home looking sad, and one day, my mom asked, “What’s wrong?”

“Well, there’s this kid at day care N-wording me. Hits me a lot.”

“Well,” she said, “I’ll tell you what we are going to do. There’s this guy named Malcolm X, and he says whenever racism rears its head, you are the one who has to stop it.”

I said, “Mom … I’m 5!” And she said, “Well, this is what you are going to do tomorrow.”

She took my little brown hand and curled it into a little brown fist and kind of swung it through the air like a punch. And repeated, “This is what you are going to do tomorrow.”

She then made me memorize some salty epithet as my battle cry. I didn’t know what any of the words meant. It was something like “deadbeat honkie.” (...)

Red_Dragon

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Posted: Nov 5, 2021 - 4:00pm

 R_P wrote:





R_P

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Posted: Nov 5, 2021 - 1:05pm


Ohmsen

Ohmsen Avatar

Gender: Male


Posted: Nov 1, 2021 - 2:53pm

My Horn Don’t Dig Those Race Troubles – When White Supremacists Bombed Louis Armstrong

The noise from the dynamite reverberated around the Jacob Building, echoing under the balconies and the barreled ceiling. A woman half a mile away heard it.

“Man, I’ll play anywhere they’ll listen,” he said, “I’ll blow anywhere. The horn don’t dig those race troubles”
– Louis Armstrong

Louis Armstrong drawing a trumpet and autographing the side of a young man’s head in Nice, France, 1961. - (Source.)
R_P

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Posted: Oct 28, 2021 - 1:38pm

Forced Relocation Left Native Americans More Exposed to Climate Threats, Data Show
Tribal nations have lost 99 percent of their historical territory. Where they live now is more vulnerable to extreme weather, adding to the debate over how to address racial injustice.
The findings, which took seven years to compile and were published Thursday in the journal Science, mark the first time that researchers have been able to quantify on a large scale what Native Americans have long believed to be true: That European settlers, and later the United States government, pushed Indigenous peoples onto marginal lands.

“Historic land dispossession is a huge factor contributing to extreme climate change vulnerability for tribes,” said Kyle Whyte, one of the study’s authors, who is a University of Michigan professor and a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation.

The new data comes as the United States suffers through increasingly severe heat waves, drought, wildfires and other disasters made worse by a warming planet. By demonstrating that government actions have made Native Americans more exposed to climate change, the authors argue, the data strengthens the case for trying to make up for that damage, however imperfectly.

“This is not just a story of the past harms,” said Justin Farrell, a Yale University professor and another of the study’s authors. “We have to think about ways to recompense for this history.”

To measure the effects of forced migration on climate exposure, the authors assembled a database showing the historical land bases and land loss of 380 individual tribes, based on data from tribal nations’ own records, land cession treaties and other federal archives. Most of the data spanned the period from the 1500s to the 1800s.

The authors then compared the amount of land tribes used to have with each tribe’s present-day reservations. In total, the amount of land shrank by 98.9 percent. In many cases, no comparison was possible: Of the 380 tribes they examined, 160 have no federally or state-recognized land base today. (...)

black321

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Location: An earth without maps
Gender: Male


Posted: Oct 12, 2021 - 10:03am

 should also be in what makes me sad thread 
cc_rider

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Location: Bastrop
Gender: Male


Posted: Oct 12, 2021 - 9:35am

 R_P wrote:
Black Children Were Jailed for a Crime That Doesn’t Exist. Almost Nothing Happened to the Adults in Charge.
Judge Donna Scott Davenport oversees a juvenile justice system in Rutherford County, Tennessee, with a staggering history of jailing children. She said kids must face consequences, which rarely seem to apply to her or the other adults in charge.
The judge was proud of what she had helped build, despite some alarming numbers buried in state reports.

Among cases referred to juvenile court, the statewide average for how often children were locked up was 5%.

In Rutherford County, it was 48%.

I read that story yesterday. Disgusting.
c.



R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Oct 11, 2021 - 1:06pm

Black Children Were Jailed for a Crime That Doesn’t Exist. Almost Nothing Happened to the Adults in Charge.
Judge Donna Scott Davenport oversees a juvenile justice system in Rutherford County, Tennessee, with a staggering history of jailing children. She said kids must face consequences, which rarely seem to apply to her or the other adults in charge.
The judge was proud of what she had helped build, despite some alarming numbers buried in state reports.

Among cases referred to juvenile court, the statewide average for how often children were locked up was 5%.

In Rutherford County, it was 48%.

(...)

Rutherford County established the position of elected juvenile court judge in 2000, and ever since, Donna Scott Davenport has been the job’s only holder. She sometimes calls herself the “mother of the county.”

Davenport runs the juvenile justice system, appointing magistrates, setting rules and presiding over cases that include everything from children accused of breaking the law to parents accused of neglecting their children. While the county’s mayor, sheriff and commissioners have turned over, she has stayed on, becoming a looming figure for thousands of families. “She’s been the judge ever since I was a kid,” said one mother whose own kids have cycled through Davenport’s courtroom. One man, now in his late 20s, said that when he was a kid in trouble, he would pray for a magistrate instead of Davenport: “If she’s having a bad day, most definitely, you’re going to have a bad day.”

While juvenile court is mostly private, Davenport keeps a highly public profile. For the past 10 years she’s had a monthly radio segment on WGNS, a local station where she talks about her work. She sees a breakdown in morals. Children lack respect: “It’s worse now than I’ve ever seen it,” she said in 2012. Parents don’t parent: “It’s just the worst I’ve ever seen,” she said in 2017. On WGNS, Davenport reminisces with the show’s host about a time when families ate dinner together and parents always knew where their children were and what friends they were with because kids called home from a landline, not some could-be-anywhere cellphone. Video games, the internet, social media — it’s all poison for children, the judge says.

Davenport describes her work as a calling. “I’m here on a mission. It’s not a job. It’s God’s mission,” she told a local newspaper. The children in her courtroom aren’t hers, but she calls them hers. “I’m seeing a lot of aggression in my 9- and 10-year-olds,” she says in one radio segment.

rgio

rgio Avatar

Location: West Jersey
Gender: Male


Posted: Oct 1, 2021 - 8:07am

 miamizsun wrote:

it would appear that the university of washington researchers have discovered a massive conspiracy to cover up racial bias among thousands of medical professionals?



As they appear in order on the Dade County website...  (page 2)

Medical Examiner

Dr. Kenneth D. Hutchins
Interim Chief Medical Examiner
Medical Examiner Building
1851 NW 10th AveMiami, FL 33136
Phone number305-545-2400


Miami-Dade County

Daniella Levine Cava
Mayor
Stephen P. Clark Center
111 NW 1st StreetMiami, FL 33128
Phone number311
Email 311@miamidade.gov


Miami-Dade Police Department

Alfredo Ramirez III
Director
Fred Taylor Miami-Dade Police Headquarters
9105 NW 25th StreetDoral, FL 33172
Phone number305-4-POLICE

They are medical professionals, whose co-workers carry guns and shoot people on occasion.  They are often judge and jury for those they work with every day.  Tough spot to be in.






miamizsun

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Location: (3261.3 Miles SE of RP)
Gender: Male


Posted: Oct 1, 2021 - 5:15am

 R_P wrote:
More Than Half of Police Killings Are Undercounted, New Study Says
Researchers comparing information from death certificates with data from organizations that track police killings in the United States identified a startling discrepancy.
Police killings in America have been undercounted by more than half over the past four decades, according to a new study that raises pointed questions about racial bias among medical examiners and highlights the lack of reliable national record keeping on what has become a major public health and civil rights issue.

The study, conducted by researchers at the University of Washington and published on Thursday in The Lancet, a major British medical journal, amounts to one of the most comprehensive looks at the scope of police violence in America, and the disproportionate impact on Black people.

Researchers compared information from a federal database known as the National Vital Statistics System, which collects death certificates, with recent data from three organizations that track police killings through news reports and public records requests. When extrapolating and modeling that data back decades, they identified a startling discrepancy: About 55 percent of fatal encounters with the police between 1980 and 2018 were listed as another cause of death.

The findings reflect both the contentious role of medical examiners and coroners in obscuring the real extent of police violence,
and the lack of centralized national data on an issue that has caused enormous upheaval. Private nonprofits and journalists have filled the gap by mining news reports and social media. (...)

Researchers estimated that over the time period they studied, which roughly tracks the era of the war on drugs and the rise of mass incarceration, nearly 31,000 Americans were killed by the police, with more than 17,000 of them going unaccounted for in the official statistics. The study also documented a stark racial gap: Black Americans were 3.5 times as likely to be killed by the police as white Americans were. Data on Asian Americans was not included in the study, but Latinos and Native Americans also suffered higher rates of fatal police violence than white people. (...)



it would appear that the university of washington researchers have discovered a massive conspiracy to cover up racial bias among thousands of medical professionals?


R_P

R_P Avatar



Posted: Sep 30, 2021 - 7:46pm

More Than Half of Police Killings Are Undercounted, New Study Says
Researchers comparing information from death certificates with data from organizations that track police killings in the United States identified a startling discrepancy.
Police killings in America have been undercounted by more than half over the past four decades, according to a new study that raises pointed questions about racial bias among medical examiners and highlights the lack of reliable national record keeping on what has become a major public health and civil rights issue.

The study, conducted by researchers at the University of Washington and published on Thursday in The Lancet, a major British medical journal, amounts to one of the most comprehensive looks at the scope of police violence in America, and the disproportionate impact on Black people.

Researchers compared information from a federal database known as the National Vital Statistics System, which collects death certificates, with recent data from three organizations that track police killings through news reports and public records requests. When extrapolating and modeling that data back decades, they identified a startling discrepancy: About 55 percent of fatal encounters with the police between 1980 and 2018 were listed as another cause of death.

The findings reflect both the contentious role of medical examiners and coroners in obscuring the real extent of police violence, and the lack of centralized national data on an issue that has caused enormous upheaval. Private nonprofits and journalists have filled the gap by mining news reports and social media. (...)

Researchers estimated that over the time period they studied, which roughly tracks the era of the war on drugs and the rise of mass incarceration, nearly 31,000 Americans were killed by the police, with more than 17,000 of them going unaccounted for in the official statistics. The study also documented a stark racial gap: Black Americans were 3.5 times as likely to be killed by the police as white Americans were. Data on Asian Americans was not included in the study, but Latinos and Native Americans also suffered higher rates of fatal police violence than white people. (...)


R_P

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Posted: Aug 12, 2021 - 11:27am

The March of the Karens
The name has come to represent an entitled and belligerent white woman. But what does this narrative say — and elide — about racism and sexism today?
Posted online and watched by millions, the Karen video offers a kind of wish-fulfillment fantasy in which racism is actually punished. It’s a fantasy not only for people of color but for white people, too, who are among the most vociferous in their denunciations of Karen, perhaps seeking to distance themselves from any suggestion that they might be complicit in her actions or capable of them. To go even further: It’s a white person’s fantasy that racism is just a matter of a few semi-hysterical, possibly mentally unstable characters, ranting on the fringes, dismissed with a flick of the screen.

ONLY KAREN WAS never an anomaly. Miss Ann (sometimes Miss Anne) was her forerunner, coming from Southern Black vernacular of the 19th century — the mistress of the plantation, the boss lady (and proto-girlboss), with a mandatory honorific. While she was subordinate to the white man (Mr. Charlie), she still held a higher status in the hierarchy than Black people and exploited this for all she was worth, alternately imperious and dainty, belligerent and helpless, depending on context. The moniker has persisted: The writer Zora Neale Hurston listed it in a glossary appended to her 1942 short fiction “Story in Harlem Slang,” the memoirist and civil rights activist Maya Angelou deployed it in her poem “Sepia Fashion Show” in 1969 (“I’d remind them please, look at those knees, / you got at Miss Ann’s scrubbing”) and as late as 2016, when CNN exit polls for the presidential election indicated that more than 40 percent of white women had voted for Donald Trump, the journalist Amy Alexander, writing on The Root, explained the results as the “Miss Ann effect.”

But as Carla Kaplan, a professor of American literature, notes in “Miss Anne in Harlem” (2013), by the time of the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s, a more subtle white woman had come to earn the name — one who intentionally entered Black spaces at a time when other white people denounced such an act “as either degeneracy or lunacy.” Some of these women were activists, others mere thrill-seekers or provocateurs, their motives and desires ranging “from dreadful to honorable,” Kaplan writes, and they were greeted in the Black community with caution.

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