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Traveling Wilburys — Tweeter And The Monkey Man
Album: Vol 1
Avg rating:
7.3

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1918









Released: 1988
Length: 5:19
Plays (last 30 days): 1
Tweeter and the Monkey Man were hard up for cash
They stayed up all night, selling cocaine and hash
To an undercover cop who had a sister named Jan
For reasons unexplained, she loved the Monkey Man

Tweeter was a boy scout before she went to Vietnam
And found out the hard way, nobody gives a damn
They knew that they'd find freedom just across the Jersey Line
So they hopped into a stolen car, took Highway 99

And the walls came down
All the way to hell
Never saw them when they're standing
Never saw them when they fell

The undercover cop never liked the Monkey Man
Even back in childhood, he wanted to see him in the can
Jan got married at fourteen to a racketeer named Bill
She made secret calls to the Monkey Man from a mansion on the hill

It was out on thunder road, Tweeter at the wheel
They crashed into paradise, they could hear them tires squeal
The undercover cop pulled up and said, ''"Everyone of you's a liar
If you don't surrender now, it's gonna go down to the wire"''

And the walls came down
All the way to hell
Never saw them when they're standing
Never saw them when they fell

An ambulance rolled up, a state trooper close behind
Tweeter took his gun away and messed up his mind
The undercover cop was left tied up to a tree
Near the souvenir stand by the old abandoned factory

Next day the undercover cop was hot in pursuit
He was taking the whole thing personal, he didn't care about the loot
Jan had told him many times, ''"It was you to me who taught
In Jersey anything's legal as long as you don't get caught."''

And the walls came down
All the way to hell
Never saw them when they're standing
Never saw them when they fell

Someplace by Rahway Prison, they ran out of gas
The undercover cop had cornered them said, ''"Boy, you didn't think that this could last"''
Jan jumped out of bed said, ''"There's someplace I gotta go"''
She took a gun out of the drawer and said, ''"It's best if you don't know"''

The undercover cop was found face down in a field
The Monkey Man was on the river bridge using Tweeter as a shield
Jan said to the Monkey Man, ''"I'm not fooled by Tweeter's curl
I knew him long before he ever became a Jersey girl"''

And the walls came down
All the way to hell
Never saw them when they're standing
Never saw them when they fell

Now the town of Jersey City is quieting down again
I'm sitting in a gambling club called The Lion's Den
The TV set was blown up, every bit of it is gone
Ever since the nightly news show that the Monkey Man was on

I guess I'll go to Florida and get myself some sun
There ain't no more opportunity here, everything's been done
Sometimes I think of Tweeter, sometimes I think of Jan
Sometimes I don't think about nothing but the Monkey Man

And the walls came down
All the way to hell
Never saw them when they're standing
Never saw them when they fell

And the walls came down
All the way to hell
Never saw them when they're standing
Never saw them when they fell
Comments (195)add comment
 Wardleader wrote:
This is a tribute to Bruce Springsteen and NJ.   Springsteen's song, "Part Man, Part Monkey", inspired Dylan.  If you listen to the song, it contains elements of Bruce"s stage act over the years, in particular his long hair screaming bouts with his dad over the war, the draft and waiting for the army to make a man out him.  When I first saw him in Trenton NJ in '74, the stories he told were all events in his life and later in his autobio, I realized just how personal much of what he said on stage really was. It was my story I heard up on stage.  I screamed at father he screamed back at me, worse than the violent typhoons he survived in the Pacific as a sailor in the Spanish Merchant Marines and then the US Navy for 20 years starting with WWII.

It moved myself and my friends, at the time, I was carrying a Draft Card in my wallet, even though the Viet Nam war was winding down, and Nixon was driven from office, it wasn't until March of next year in '75 that we were driven from Viet Nam in as much disgrace and loss as Nixon's exit from the White House, both featuring helicopters taking off from an embattled territory.   These songs ring like the Liberty Bell did against slavery in Philadelphia when the Abolitionist Movement was founded and used the iconic bell as its symbol for the promise of freedom, and the not yet realization of all that high minded language in the Declaration of Independence.   This song is the bitterness of that time so strong you can spit it out of your mouth just trying to lose the taste.  Springsteen is much admired by many of his peers, always to my surprise that he was so accepted, by Lou Reed, Patti Smith and today, Jason Isbell who covers Born In the USA in the Springsteen Tribute, DEAD MAN'S TOWN.  Dylan as Springsteen, Springsteen as Dylan, it happens in this song, like an episode of the Soprano TV show in a few minutes done only with words and music.
 
I loved reading this comment.
 On_The_Beach wrote:
Roy, George & Tom have all shuffled off.
Only 2 Wilburys are still with us.  : (
 

Don't kill my vibe!! 
 BCarn wrote:

Perhaps your taste in music is skewed. The TW's are a bunch of musicians who've (had) made it. They were having fun. They were in it for themselves and they shared it with us. The music they put out was quality...and fun. This song is part of that.
 

Arrogant and Condescending comment.
For some of us the  so called fun did not produce  quality.
Just Top 40 Radio fodder.
 Shipp wrote:
Bob enters his 80. year tomorrow. Thank you for all those songs since '62.
 
Good call. Cheers Bob
Bob enters his 80. year tomorrow. Thank you for all those songs since '62.
 ace-marc wrote:
The great  parts are much better  than the less than stellar sum. 
Did they form this band because it was fun?
Because they surely  didn't form it to make great music.
 Well that's an asshole comment!

The great  parts are much better  than the less than stellar sum. 
Did they form this band because it was fun?
Because they surely  didn't form it to make great music.
 jpfueler wrote:


Nadler and Schiff
 
The reasoning has to do with "Tweeter" - neither of the Democrats you cited has a propensity for using Twitter as a forum as much as our current Commander-in-Chief.
 idiot_wind wrote:
Trump and Pence? 

Trump and Boris Johnson? 
 

Nadler and Schiff
 maxjboxer wrote:
Only 2 of 5 left.  So sad...
 

Tempus fugit.
But music transcends.  
Trump and Pence? 

Trump and Boris Johnson? 
Long Live                                                                                                                      Radio Paradise
My rating increases from                                           8 - Most Excellent   to  9 - OUTSTANDING
 Wardleader wrote:
This is a tribute to Bruce Springsteen and NJ.   Springsteen's song, "Part Man, Part Monkey", inspired Dylan.  If you listen to the song, it contains elements of Bruce"s stage act over the years, in particular his long hair screaming bouts with his dad over the war, the draft and waiting for the army to make a man out him.  When I first saw him in Trenton NJ in '74, the stories he told were all events in his life and later in his autobio, I realized just how personal much of what he said on stage really was. It was my story I heard up on stage.  I screamed at father he screamed back at me, worse than the violent typhoons he survived in the Pacific as a sailor in the Spanish Merchant Marines and then the US Navy for 20 years starting with WWII.

It moved myself and my friends, at the time, I was carrying a Draft Card in my wallet, even though the Viet Nam war was winding down, and Nixon was driven from office, it wasn't until March of next year in '75 that we were driven from Viet Nam in as much disgrace and loss as Nixon's exit from the White House, both featuring helicopters taking off from an embattled territory.   These songs ring like the Liberty Bell did against slavery in Philadelphia when the Abolitionist Movement was founded and used the iconic bell as its symbol for the promise of freedom, and the not yet realization of all that high minded language in the Declaration of Independence.   This song is the bitterness of that time so strong you can spit it out of your mouth just trying to lose the taste.  Springsteen is much admired by many of his peers, always to my surprise that he was so accepted, by Lou Reed, Patti Smith and today, Jason Isbell who covers Born In the USA in the Springsteen Tribute, DEAD MAN'S TOWN.  Dylan as Springsteen, Springsteen as Dylan, it happens in this song, like an episode of the Soprano TV show in a few minutes done only with words and music.

  This was a pleasure to read.

 steuss wrote:
Great mix tonight, Bill, on the night of the Trump inauguration {#Foot-in-mouth}.  Knew you would come through.

I Scare Myself
Into the Fire
Amazing Grace
The Loner
Sour Times
Acid Tongue
Driven to Tears
Still a Freak
Excitable  Boy
End of Days
Speed the Collapse
Don't Wanna Know About Evil
I Close My Eyes
Baby Did a Bad Thing (Feel like crying)
If There's a Rocket Tie Me To It
and the best.....Tweeter and the Monkey Man (..and the walls came down, all the way to hell)

Helping me make signs for the protests tomorrow in San Diego.  Daughter protesting in SF.
 
As true then Steuss then as it is now. Cracking tune and no mistake!
It's almost impossible to choose between this version and Tom Petty's live version, may he rest in peace.
 Grayson wrote:
I'm going to assume this was written by Bob Dylan. Having spent about a freakin' career by now bad-mouthing Dylan (you know, parents' gen's idol; gotta diss the seniors), I admit to really very much digging this song. Please don't tell anyone. Could ruin my rep. 
 
+1

On this track, they didn't let him sing quite the way that he normally does. The backing and the chorus dilutes it nicely.
 Wardleader wrote:
This is a tribute to Bruce Springsteen and NJ.   Springsteen's song, "Part Man, Part Monkey", inspired Dylan.  If you listen to the song, it contains elements of Bruce"s stage act over the years, in particular his long hair screaming bouts with his dad over the war, the draft and waiting for the army to make a man out him.  When I first saw him in Trenton NJ in '74, the stories he told were all events in his life and later in his autobio, I realized just how personal much of what he said on stage really was. It was my story I heard up on stage.  I screamed at father he screamed back at me, worse than the violent typhoons he survived in the Pacific as a sailor in the Spanish Merchant Marines and then the US Navy for 20 years starting with WWII.

It moved myself and my friends, at the time, I was carrying a Draft Card in my wallet, even though the Viet Nam war was winding down, and Nixon was driven from office, it wasn't until March of next year in '75 that we were driven from Viet Nam in as much disgrace and loss as Nixon's exit from the White House, both featuring helicopters taking off from an embattled territory.   These songs ring like the Liberty Bell did against slavery in Philadelphia when the Abolitionist Movement was founded and used the iconic bell as its symbol for the promise of freedom, and the not yet realization of all that high minded language in the Declaration of Independence.   This song is the bitterness of that time so strong you can spit it out of your mouth just trying to lose the taste.  Springsteen is much admired by many of his peers, always to my surprise that he was so accepted, by Lou Reed, Patti Smith and today, Jason Isbell who covers Born In the USA in the Springsteen Tribute, DEAD MAN'S TOWN.  Dylan as Springsteen, Springsteen as Dylan, it happens in this song, like an episode of the Soprano TV show in a few minutes done only with words and music.

 
Damn,,,, great comment and story. Thanks for the education. Never knew this was connected to Bruce. Listening now, brings a whole different appreciation. 

Thank You 
 kingart wrote:

Holy s***. 
I'm a NJ boy, by way of Brooklyn, but my first real taste of Bruce (aside from a few whiffs of Rosalita and Hard to be a Saint in the City) was Born to Run that came BLASTING out of a first floor dorm room window at 100 Beacon Street in Boston in the spring of 1975. Along with a mini weather system cloud of pot smoke. I was strolling on the sidewalk and stopped dead.in.my.tracks.  Bruce had me at hello.  Talk about being arrested by sound. And everything Wardleader wrote rings as true as a bell. 
 
I became acquainted with Born to Run in northern Manitoba as I looked for employment while USWA brothers and sisters at the coal mine in SE British Columbia were on strike.  Summer 1976.

Then 2 years later I heard Jungleland as I hitched away from a coal mine on the Argentina/Chile border.  At 11:30 PM in the emptiness of the Patagonian desert.  It was sublime.

A few days earlier I had hiked 5 days around the Paine Towers.  Did not see a soul for 3 days.  Glorious.  
Own the CD.

The entire album is streamed right here  THE WILBURYS ARE HERE… ON ALL STREAMING SERVICES WORLDWIDE!
 Wardleader wrote:
This is a tribute to Bruce Springsteen and NJ.   Springsteen's song, "Part Man, Part Monkey", inspired Dylan.  If you listen to the song, it contains elements of Bruce"s stage act over the years, in particular his long hair screaming bouts with his dad over the war, the draft and waiting for the army to make a man out him.  When I first saw him in Trenton NJ in '74, the stories he told were all events in his life and later in his autobio, I realized just how personal much of what he said on stage really was. It was my story I heard up on stage.  I screamed at father he screamed back at me, worse than the violent typhoons he survived in the Pacific as a sailor in the Spanish Merchant Marines and then the US Navy for 20 years starting with WWII.

It moved myself and my friends, at the time, I was carrying a Draft Card in my wallet, even though the Viet Nam war was winding down, and Nixon was driven from office, it wasn't until March of next year in '75 that we were driven from Viet Nam in as much disgrace and loss as Nixon's exit from the White House, both featuring helicopters taking off from an embattled territory.   These songs ring like the Liberty Bell did against slavery in Philadelphia when the Abolitionist Movement was founded and used the iconic bell as its symbol for the promise of freedom, and the not yet realization of all that high minded language in the Declaration of Independence.   This song is the bitterness of that time so strong you can spit it out of your mouth just trying to lose the taste.  Springsteen is much admired by many of his peers, always to my surprise that he was so accepted, by Lou Reed, Patti Smith and today, Jason Isbell who covers Born In the USA in the Springsteen Tribute, DEAD MAN'S TOWN.  Dylan as Springsteen, Springsteen as Dylan, it happens in this song, like an episode of the Soprano TV show in a few minutes done only with words and music.

 
Holy s***. 
I'm a NJ boy, by way of Brooklyn, but my first real taste of Bruce (aside from a few whiffs of Rosalita and Hard to be a Saint in the City) was Born to Run that came BLASTING out of a first floor dorm room window at 100 Beacon Street in Boston in the spring of 1975. Along with a mini weather system cloud of pot smoke. I was strolling on the sidewalk and stopped dead.in.my.tracks.  Bruce had me at hello.  Talk about being arrested by sound. And everything Wardleader wrote rings as true as a bell. 
Only 2 of 5 left.  So sad...
 Wardleader wrote:
This is a tribute to Bruce Springsteen and NJ.   Springsteen's song, "Part Man, Part Monkey", inspired Dylan.  If you listen to the song, it contains elements of Bruce"s stage act over the years, in particular his long hair screaming bouts with his dad over the war, the draft and waiting for the army to make a man out him.  When I first saw him in Trenton NJ in '74, the stories he told were all events in his life and later in his autobio, I realized just how personal much of what he said on stage really was. It was my story I heard up on stage.  I screamed at father he screamed back at me, worse than the violent typhoons he survived in the Pacific as a sailor in the Spanish Merchant Marines and then the US Navy for 20 years starting with WWII.

It moved myself and my friends, at the time, I was carrying a Draft Card in my wallet, even though the Viet Nam war was winding down, and Nixon was driven from office, it wasn't until March of next year in '75 that we were driven from Viet Nam in as much disgrace and loss as Nixon's exit from the White House, both featuring helicopters taking off from an embattled territory.   These songs ring like the Liberty Bell did against slavery in Philadelphia when the Abolitionist Movement was founded and used the iconic bell as its symbol for the promise of freedom, and the not yet realization of all that high minded language in the Declaration of Independence.   This song is the bitterness of that time so strong you can spit it out of your mouth just trying to lose the taste.  Springsteen is much admired by many of his peers, always to my surprise that he was so accepted, by Lou Reed, Patti Smith and today, Jason Isbell who covers Born In the USA in the Springsteen Tribute, DEAD MAN'S TOWN.  Dylan as Springsteen, Springsteen as Dylan, it happens in this song, like an episode of the Soprano TV show in a few minutes done only with words and music.

 
That has to rate as one of the most personal, profound, and intelligent comments I've read anywhere.
Thank you for that insight...
 Wardleader wrote:
This is a tribute to Bruce Springsteen and NJ.   Springsteen's song, "Part Man, Part Monkey", inspired Dylan.  If you listen to the song, it contains elements of Bruce"s stage act over the years, in particular his long hair screaming bouts with his dad over the war, the draft and waiting for the army to make a man out him.  When I first saw him in Trenton NJ in '74, the stories he told were all events in his life and later in his autobio, I realized just how personal much of what he said on stage really was. It was my story I heard up on stage.  I screamed at father he screamed back at me, worse than the violent typhoons he survived in the Pacific as a sailor in the Spanish Merchant Marines and then the US Navy for 20 years starting with WWII.

It moved myself and my friends, at the time, I was carrying a Draft Card in my wallet, even though the Viet Nam war was winding down, and Nixon was driven from office, it wasn't until March of next year in '75 that we were driven from Viet Nam in as much disgrace and loss as Nixon's exit from the White House, both featuring helicopters taking off from an embattled territory.   These songs ring like the Liberty Bell did against slavery in Philadelphia when the Abolitionist Movement was founded and used the iconic bell as its symbol for the promise of freedom, and the not yet realization of all that high minded language in the Declaration of Independence.   This song is the bitterness of that time so strong you can spit it out of your mouth just trying to lose the taste.  Springsteen is much admired by many of his peers, always to my surprise that he was so accepted, by Lou Reed, Patti Smith and today, Jason Isbell who covers Born In the USA in the Springsteen Tribute, DEAD MAN'S TOWN.  Dylan as Springsteen, Springsteen as Dylan, it happens in this song, like an episode of the Soprano TV show in a few minutes done only with words and music.

 
Ok then. I'm with you ^^. I think. 
I'm going to assume this was written by Bob Dylan. Having spent about a freakin' career by now bad-mouthing Dylan (you know, parents' gen's idol; gotta diss the seniors), I admit to really very much digging this song. Please don't tell anyone. Could ruin my rep. 
I somehow missed this. The Gods speaking! Thank you for introducing me to this!
She took a gun out of the drawer and said, ''"It's an opportunity.
It's kind of like "lets do an updated version of .......La La La and the Jack of Hearts"  - that you can't get your head around on the first listen -  no doubt that thought been posted before
Roy, George & Tom have all shuffled off.
Only 2 Wilburys are still with us.  : (
This is a tribute to Bruce Springsteen and NJ.   Springsteen's song, "Part Man, Part Monkey", inspired Dylan.  If you listen to the song, it contains elements of Bruce"s stage act over the years, in particular his long hair screaming bouts with his dad over the war, the draft and waiting for the army to make a man out him.  When I first saw him in Trenton NJ in '74, the stories he told were all events in his life and later in his autobio, I realized just how personal much of what he said on stage really was. It was my story I heard up on stage.  I screamed at father he screamed back at me, worse than the violent typhoons he survived in the Pacific as a sailor in the Spanish Merchant Marines and then the US Navy for 20 years starting with WWII.

It moved myself and my friends, at the time, I was carrying a Draft Card in my wallet, even though the Viet Nam war was winding down, and Nixon was driven from office, it wasn't until March of next year in '75 that we were driven from Viet Nam in as much disgrace and loss as Nixon's exit from the White House, both featuring helicopters taking off from an embattled territory.   These songs ring like the Liberty Bell did against slavery in Philadelphia when the Abolitionist Movement was founded and used the iconic bell as its symbol for the promise of freedom, and the not yet realization of all that high minded language in the Declaration of Independence.   This song is the bitterness of that time so strong you can spit it out of your mouth just trying to lose the taste.  Springsteen is much admired by many of his peers, always to my surprise that he was so accepted, by Lou Reed, Patti Smith and today, Jason Isbell who covers Born In the USA in the Springsteen Tribute, DEAD MAN'S TOWN.  Dylan as Springsteen, Springsteen as Dylan, it happens in this song, like an episode of the Soprano TV show in a few minutes done only with words and music.
Killer. And I mean that in a good way.
 ch83575 wrote:

Is this a photo of Lou Reed?

 
{#Roflol}
the best song of the wilburys Project. and so much better than what dylan recorded under his own Name during These years -. thanks for not forgetting this and playing it
As much as I like this, the version by the headstones still strikes me as a better song.
 jhorton wrote:
Might be good music if it wasn't so horrible to listen to.

 
Perhaps your taste in music is skewed. The TW's are a bunch of musicians who've (had) made it. They were having fun. They were in it for themselves and they shared it with us. The music they put out was quality...and fun. This song is part of that.
 BobLoblaw wrote:
Is this song about Rob Ford?

 
yes
Great mix tonight, Bill, on the night of the Trump inauguration {#Foot-in-mouth}.  Knew you would come through.

I Scare Myself
Into the Fire
Amazing Grace
The Loner
Sour Times
Acid Tongue
Driven to Tears
Still a Freak
Excitable  Boy
End of Days
Speed the Collapse
Don't Wanna Know About Evil
I Close My Eyes
Baby Did a Bad Thing (Feel like crying)
If There's a Rocket Tie Me To It
and the best.....Tweeter and the Monkey Man (..and the walls came down, all the way to hell)

Helping me make signs for the protests tomorrow in San Diego.  Daughter protesting in SF.
 fatport wrote:
My take on this song is a Wilburys' parody of Springsteen, what with the references to Thunder Road and Jersey Girl.
 
Makes good sense except the wiki page refers to the song as a 'friendly homage' to Bruce Springstein, once acclaimed as the 'next Bob Dylan'.  

Good fun song all the same.  Dylan's vocals are excellent.   
Might be good music if it wasn't so horrible to listen to.
 ottojschlosser wrote:
Am I the only one who hears this as Dylan's drunken love song to Bruce Springsteen?

 

not sure if it's a love song - it's Bob, so I'm presuming more snark than love.
does anyone know what Bruce thinks of it? Insulted or flattered?
 Stephen_Phillips wrote:
Monkey Man

 
Is this a photo of Lou Reed?
Sound like Bob  was full piss and vinegar when he sang.

Maybe someone asked him prior to singing the song: "Hey Bob, what's the meaning of this song"?   
Monkey Man
 ottojschlosser wrote:
Am I the only one who hears this as Dylan's drunken love song to Bruce Springsteen?

 
no, way too many references to Springsteen songs ("Thunder Road", jersey girl, janey, Highway 99 etc, characters on the run)

for the curious, songwriter breakdown on this record: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traveling_Wilburys_Vol._1


 Jota wrote:

They're ok but much less than the sum of their parts.

 
Absurd - especially since it's basically impossible for this group to be MORE than the sum of their parts.

They clearly had a grand old time making this album, as Dylan's friendly little poke at Springsteen here clearly shows. 
One of the coolest rock-stories ever, and I love how Bob Dylan took that old-school skill of his and bent it in such a Wilbury way. Yeah!
 Jota wrote:
They're ok but much less than the sum of their parts.
 
They didn't exactly need each other to make it happen…probably saw this collaboration as a fun gig with soulmates in music (if not old friends) but "did their thing" as they always have done. Also, maybe, a chance to sell more output (agents and lawyers weighing in?). Still, I really like a few of the tracks from this CD.
Sublime, upgraded from a 9 to a 10.
 easmann wrote:
I've always been disappointed by this super group. Never had so many talented people created such self-indulgent and mediocre work.

 
They're ok but much less than the sum of their parts.
Yeap! You're perfectly right. It's fun!
ottojschlosser wrote:
Am I the only one who hears this as Dylan's drunken love song to Bruce Springsteen?

 


 oldfart48 wrote:
best rock band ever existed, no contest.......{#Cowboy} need a 100 button............{#Sunny}

 
..... agree, see button below

{ 100 }
 oldfart48 wrote:
best rock band ever existed, no contest.......{#Cowboy} need a 100 button............{#Sunny}

 
^ what I think. 
Never took to this band, but like this because it seems more like an early Dylan song
Is this song about Rob Ford?
 ick wrote:
Jeff:  "Dylan wants to sing on one".
Tom:  "Let's let him do the Tweeter & Monkey Man number."
Roy:  {rolls eyes... walks out of the booth} 

 
die, infidel.....you are not worthy.........
best rock band ever existed, no contest.......{#Cowboy} need a 100 button............{#Sunny}
 BobLoblaw wrote:
Prefer the Headstones cover but this is still good.

 
Me too! By far. (And I like how they changed Jersey to Kingston...)
Jeff:  "Dylan wants to sing on one".
Tom:  "Let's let him do the Tweeter & Monkey Man number."
Roy:  {rolls eyes... walks out of the booth} 
 Stingray wrote:
12

 
/2
Am I correct ?   Anyone? Anyone? 
msymmes wrote:
Good piece from a very fine project.  I think the album won a Grammy in 1989.

 


Am I the only one who hears this as Dylan's drunken love song to Bruce Springsteen?
Yup. Almost...

 

Stingray wrote:
12

 


Lynne is a genious.  

Just suck it up.  A mega band before they even got together !!

 
 kcar wrote:
This isn't a bad Dylan song—it does sound like a Dylanish ballad—but the chorus is not a good idea. Too Jeff Lynne/ELOish. 
 
Oh shame ! jeff lynne work on this tune is just what was appropriate.


Everybody in my church loves this song...

 
 alph wrote:
Yeah, they're no Damn Yankees. But who is? 

jmassoglia wrote:
Wow, this whole super group thing really is hit or miss.  I was terribly disappointed with this effort as I am a huge Roy Orbison fan and really thought this group might work out.   {#Cry}
 
  Good thing - Damn Yankees were AWFUL.

Then again anything Ted Nugent...


 jmassoglia wrote:
Wow, this whole super group thing really is hit or miss.  I was terribly disappointed with this effort as I am a huge Roy Orbison fan and really thought this group might work out.   {#Cry}
 
It's like all-star hockey games, fun to see them all in one place but it rarely makes for great hockey. 
Yeah, they're no Damn Yankees. But who is? 

jmassoglia wrote:
Wow, this whole super group thing really is hit or miss.  I was terribly disappointed with this effort as I am a huge Roy Orbison fan and really thought this group might work out.   {#Cry}
 


Prefer the Headstones cover but this is still good.
This isn't a bad Dylan song—it does sound like a Dylanish ballad—but the chorus is not a good idea. Too Jeff Lynne/ELOish. 
Wow, this whole super group thing really is hit or miss.  I was terribly disappointed with this effort as I am a huge Roy Orbison fan and really thought this group might work out.   {#Cry}
Is this a  John Mellencamp (Cougar) ripoff? {#Lol}

Sorry, but that's where I was going when I first heard it, trying to recall who it was or, at any rate, who else performed it. It's that walls coming down thing...
12
{#Cheers}
Just broke out the album a couple of days ago and played the whole thing.

This is a standout song in an album of great stuff.
 TJS wrote:
This song would be great without Dylan's 'vocals'.
 
Tastes vary. I, for one, think Dylan is part of the reason that this song is awesome. :)
Can't. Stop. Tapping. Woo! 
 
This song would be great without Dylan's 'vocals'.
Good piece from a very fine project.  I think the album won a Grammy in 1989.


This song is soooo good my nipples get hard when I hear it...


 
 jersey_birdman wrote:

Simply a 10..

{#Clap}


 
 So my 10 plus your 10 = pure music to our ears .. Hard to beat on long trips— blasting the Wilbury's
cranked up to max. People look at me like I've flipped but I like singing in my car, better than the shower
This album is a great one to sing along with.   

 


Simply a 10..

{#Clap}


Anyone else getting dead air?
 WonderLizard wrote:
"And Leon is getting laaaaarrrrrger."
  Aces! R.I.P., Stephen Stucker

The Headstones cover of the song is superior. Love the story in the song!
Whats He saaaaaaaaaying,,,,
I agree with the comment below, there's no way this can be 20 years old. Freaked out!
 nate917 wrote:
Bob was Lucky.  Roy was Lefty.
 
"And Leon is getting laaaaarrrrrger."

If Webster's has a dictionary that played music, this song would be the definition of "over-produced." A little Jeff Lynne sure goes a long way. E,L,Oh my God!


 HazzeSwede wrote:
Side project,,?,,this is what this these guys made,, for you kids to wonder and reflect upon,,please do that !{#Meditate}
  Bleyfusz wrote:

Who did you mean: this guy or these guys? {#Question}
    Happy now ? Man/Woman of many ponders.

I've always taken the lyrics to be a big "take that!" to Springsteen.
Great TW song feat. BD. Has it been alreay twenty years? Time sure travels fast!
 Manbird wrote:
sucks. songs (and movies) with  lamo nicknames are stupid. always.
 

Are you sick??

Having a hearing-problem?

Unbelievable statement!!!


This track has a lot of Glen Frey stuff in it, chords,beats, transitions ... hope Frey got a percentage ...
 



You bring up Glen Frey as if he is an influence when you've got Harrison, Orbison, Petty and Dylan - LMAO

Talk to Glen Frey
 

Right!

Who is Frey....? In comparison?

UNBELIEVABLE SONG - possibly Dylan's best!

A CLEAR "10"...!!!


Lineup:

George Harrison, Jeff Lynne, Roy Orbison, Tom Petty and Bob Dylan
All my favorite artist in one band!! Thats what I like!!
 HazzeSwede wrote:
Side project,,?,,this is what this guys made,, for you kids to wonder and reflect upon,,please do that !{#Meditate}
 
Who did you mean: this guy or these guys? {#Question}
 Misterfixit wrote:
This track has a lot of Glen Frey stuff in it, chords,beats, transitions ... hope Frey got a percentage ...
 

You bring up Glen Frey as if he is an influence when you've got Harrison, Orbison, Petty and Dylan - LMAO

Talk to Glen Frey
Bob was Lucky.  Roy was Lefty.
Favorite line "In Jersey anything's legal, just as long as you don't get caught"
Dylan's songwriting at it's finest. Love it.
,,,and Oh,,Merry X-mas ! xmas-smiley-4605

 Bleyfusz wrote:
Not bad for a side project.
  Side project,,?,,this is what this guys made,, for you kids to wonder and reflect upon,,please do that !{#Meditate}
 HazzeSwede wrote:
Had to move this up to # 10,not that it's God Like,just to make a Stand!{#Yell}
 
,,and in it for the money,,that is just so stooped,I'll have no further comments!
{#Moon}

 OldFrenchie wrote:
The Headstones version is better than this by several orders of magnitude.
  You only say that because they're your hometown band! Personally, this is the version!


S'not bad, like this a lot...


This song is soooo good for the ears...


 bindi wrote:
It always seemed like these guys got together because it would be fun to do. At least I doubt that it was strictly for the money. I thought they made some really likable songs.
 
Think that not one of them did it for the money. For these guys it was not a must, i guess!.


Really nice, this music i like most!
Great song...love it
These guys were talking about Tweeter before anybody else on teh internet. That's how ahead of their time they were.
Had to move this up to # 10,not that it's God Like,just to make a Stand!{#Yell}
Yeah!!! I have this one on lp and think I have to listen to it again - THANKS!
Not bad for a side project.


love it...


It always seemed like these guys got together because it would be fun to do. At least I doubt that it was strictly for the money. I thought they made some really likable songs.
This track has a lot of Glen Frey stuff in it, chords,beats, transitions ... hope Frey got a percentage ...
You should have played this one right after Thunder Road, Bill.
Best tune on a great album. 10
sucks. songs (and movies) with  lamo nicknames are stupid. always.
What ever your thoughts. One of the very very few  super groups of singer songwirters, that just got together and rip off some of the most fun , pop, and enjoyable tunes of the late 20th century music in the USA. And in process , had fun together, and not all the BS of so many groups before and since