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KurtfromLaQuinta

KurtfromLaQuinta Avatar

Location: Really deep in the heart of South California
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 14, 2021 - 8:50pm

 kurtster wrote:
8 Aug 2021

Been awhile. Comments, if any are welcome.

{#Cheers}
  Y'all

CLICKY

Thank for that Kurt!
Sounds real nice and clear!

Ohmsen

Ohmsen Avatar

Location: Over the rainbow
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 10, 2021 - 10:10am

 westslope wrote:

Revolver, All Things Must Pass, ......   sweet.

As for Patti Boyd, seems like cocaine and especially alcohol played leading roles in outcomes.

FWIW, a neighbour divorced his wife and the mother of his children in order to marry his ex-wife's best friend.  These folks are bikers if that matters, I am not sure.

I don't pretend to understand it all being more of a until death do us part, monogamous kinda guy.  


I guess, until one finds peace within oneself, it goes like, well... I've had one, now I can have another, and so on. At least this is, how life turned out for me. Thankfully arriving at peace within after decades of life-long struggle, I can say, I've luckily settled in a partnership in my early 50s, almost a decade ago.
Not sayin' I'd switched partners as underpants, no. Quite a few partnerships lasting over many years, 3 kids with 2 mothers. - But still... thank God!

Inner peace is such a great fun to live! When the craving finally ends, because there's nothing to crave for anymore, and testosterone stops bugging you.

It can happen, and I think meditation did it for me.
westslope

westslope Avatar

Location: BC sage brush steppe


Posted: Aug 10, 2021 - 9:58am

 kurtster wrote:
8 Aug 2021

....... Clapton's and Harrison's friendship has always been mystifying to me given the Patti Harrison part of all of it.  Sex and drugs and rock and roll ...

.......

Revolver, All Things Must Pass, ......   sweet.

As for Patti Boyd, seems like cocaine and especially alcohol played leading roles in outcomes.

FWIW, a neighbour divorced his wife and the mother of his children in order to marry his ex-wife's best friend.  These folks are bikers if that matters, I am not sure.

I don't pretend to understand it all being more of a until death do us part, monogamous kinda guy.  

rhahl

rhahl Avatar



Posted: Aug 10, 2021 - 9:41am

This interview with Pierre Spray about recording techniques might be useful or at least interesting.
 
http://www.tnt-audio.com/intervis/mapleshade_records_e.html
kurtster

kurtster Avatar

Location: where fear is not a virtue
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 8, 2021 - 5:08pm

8 Aug 2021

Been awhile.  The past two months, at least, have been extraordinarily nutz around the homestead, what with nursing my buddy back to somewhat health, life, work and music and taking him back home to Georgia with the bonus of visiting sirdroseph.  Music worked for the first couple of weeks, but as time wore on, it sort of fell by the wayside.  I spent most of the music time going back through existing raw rips that have piled up and cleaned up a bunch of album sides and did 38 individual songs.  I also worked on assembling rips and whatnot for my buddy to take with, for sird and to update the flash drives for me and the wife for our cars.  So far this year to date, I've done 121 individual songs and ripped about a collective 400 album sides (each separate album the usual three times per side).

Now it's back to the ripping full tilt.  I just bought a new copy of Revolver for S&G's when I saw it WalMart to check it out and get ready for the arrival of the Harrison Box Set which I preordered 3 months ago.  It got here yesterday, 2 sets because of the usual defects that may be present so i can build a good one out of two or three sets as I have had to do in the past.  The Steven Wilson Yes Box set took three copies to build two good box sets and they still sit after a couple of years now to be ripped along with all kinds of other ones that have piled up.

All Things Must Pass is one of my more favorite albums of all time.  I have the 2017 Box remaster (now out of print) of the original mix and it is by far the best of all the prior efforts, imho.  So when it was announced that George's son Dhani was going to remix it and try to get Phil Spector out of it à la what was done with The Beatles Let It Be Naked, I was all in.  Let It Be Naked is really, really great in its own right and illustrates how much one can do with the same set of tracks with different approaches and how much interpretations can decide what we finally are allowed to hear by the powers that be.

So the new mix is indeed different.  Got to say it takes balls to try and change and improve a masterpiece.  It is plain to hear what was trying to be accomplished, which was to bring George's voice and guitars more into the front and less affected by the Wall Of Sound.  I've played back two tracks for direct comparison so far, What Is Life and If Not For You which is one of the most beautiful versions of this Dylan song ever.  The wife and I both prefer the 2017 original mix.  Phil Spector really did a great job of balancing the whole body of work within itself.  Other songs are a little bit harder to decide as they are different in style remembering that this album was a collection of material sitting on the shelf while George was being the quiet Beatle.  This becomes more obvious as I get down to Side 4.  Who knows, I might assemble an album of remasters from both mixes into one album.

Maybe these changes make the album more of an anthology of post Beatles material than what Spector did to make it an album of related songs.  One thing I have learned in all of my experimenting with songs is that my methods of remastering helps to make unrelated songs have a somewhat similar sound and play together much better.  The changes in techniques has been so profound over the past 15 years of doing this that when hearing some of the earliest stuff played with the present stuff I'm going what the hell was I thinking.  But there are a few songs left from that time that I cannot improve and cannot remember what I did to try it that way again.  But most of those are from CD versions.  Now I'm all vinyl for my sources and vinyl is prepared completely different for release, so the beginning sound is usually very different, but more closer to the intended.  The members of our Mixtape club here have suffered through this evolution as well.  That is another reason I keep doing the same songs over and over again, to get them right and play along with the present stuff.  Fortunately, I can listen to good songs over and over again and not get tired of hearing them too often, at least for short periods of time.  Unless something drastic happens, my approach has been finalized and this is it for the last time ... 

Have yet to get into the out takes and demos.  Have heard different thoughts on those already, but I am not a completest.  But there a few jams there that are said to be Clapton driven with direct connects to things that would become parts of Layla, who as we all know now was George's wife.  Clapton's and Harrison's friendship has always been mystifying to me given the Patti Harrison part of all of it.  Sex and drugs and rock and roll ...

Meanwhile the grunt work continues and so far only the first disc is bad enough to justify a return.  Reports of extreme warpage and other issues have surfaced over at Discogs.  Returning stuff sucks.  And my original red Zerostat seems to be dying.  Sigh.  I already have at least two dead ones of the new blue version.

More to come as I get deeper into this.  Meanwhile for those who are still reading and curious about the music itself, I'm putting up three downloadable versions of If Not For You for comparison of the two mixes raw and my remaster of the 2017 version just for S&G's.  Comments, if any are welcome.

{#Cheers}  Y'all

CLICKY
kurtster

kurtster Avatar

Location: where fear is not a virtue
Gender: Male


Posted: May 30, 2021 - 1:54am

Posting this article text here for me to refer to now  that the original source has since disappeared.  This is my journal thread and what it was intended for.

Found a new source copy but who knows how long that will be around.



Source URL:- Q&A with Barry Diament of Soundkeeper Recordings | AudioStream

Most importantly this Barry seems to be very happy with Compuetr based set-ups!


"Some of you already know about Barry Diament from his CD mastering days at Atlantic Records where he was the mastering engineer for too many classic CD releases to do justice to with a short list (here's one longer list and I'll cherry pick Led Zeppelin II, Physical Graffiti, and the majority of the Bob Marley and The Wailers catalog to give you a peak at the tip of the iceberg). And some of you may know Barry from his label Soundkeeper Recordings or his audio recording, production, consulting, mastering, and editing services offered through Barry Diament Audio.

You may also recall our Soundkeeper Recordings Format Comparisons post that talks about their free downloads of the same recordings in various levels of resolution (16/44, 24/96, and 24/192) so you can listen for yourself. And others still may have seen Barry's often informative comments on various forums.

Barry Diament was kind enough to agree to this Q&A and as you'll see, his answers are thorough and illuminating.

You have a very interesting resume that includes being one of the first CD Mastering Engineers. Can you talk a bit about your history as a recording engineer and bring us up to date with your Soundkeeper Recordings label?

First, I want to say Thank You for your interest, Michael. Im honored to be on AudioStream.

I started recording when I was eleven, playing with my brothers Concord reel-to-reel deck. While recording the weekly jams I had with a few friends, I found that I could play drums and then, using the sound-with-sound feature, add a guitar part later. Id found overdubbing without knowing what it was.

During my college years, I was reading all the audio magazines I could get my hands on, from Audio to Stereo Review to High Fidelity, later finding some of the British magazines, such as Hi-Fi News in a local magazine store. Then came the discovery of Stereophile and The Absolute Sound, both of which (in addition to Bert Whytes columns in Audio) became a sort of audio school, in addition to the other reading and experimenting I was doing.

"While the studio experience was wonderful, I noticed early on that what I heard in the control room did not sound like what I heard out in the room with the musicians."

After college, I got my first studio job as an assistant engineer, setting up microphones and operating the tape machines during recording sessions. Once I was promoted to senior (then chief) engineer, I was doing recording, overdubbing and mixing and later learned to cut vinyl in the in-house mastering room. While the studio experience was wonderful, I noticed early on that what I heard in the control room did not sound like what I heard out in the room with the musicians. So began my fascination with monitoring and the realization that this was, in my view, the single most important factor in the studio. After all, if one could not hear what they were doing, nothing else really mattered.

Then I started to ask what I call The Questions, things I was never taught and which, to my knowledge, are not taught in the real audio engineering schools that have arisen in the intervening years. Questions like Why this microphone? and Why place it here?

When I heard an editors position opened up at Atlantic Records, I jumped at the chance and luckily for me, landed the job. My specific task was to make long songs shorter (to create single versions of album length songs, radio stations preferring to keep songs not much longer than three minutes) and to make short songs longer (to create the dance versions that were popular in the clubs).

"In January of 1983, Atlantic purchased the gear to create CD masters, built a mastering room and I was made the CD mastering department."

In the mid-late 70s, Id heard talk of a new future format for recorded music called the Compact Disc. I remember a cardboard mock-up someone had given me, of a rainbow colored disc only about 5 inches in diameter, in what seemed like a miniature LP jacket. By 1982, Atlantics sister company, Warner Brothers, was already creating CD masters for the Warner family of labels (Warner, Atlantic, Elektra, etc.). In January of 1983, Atlantic purchased the gear to create CD masters, built a mastering room and I was made the CD mastering department. To my knowledge, at the time, only Sony in Japan, Polygram in Germany and Warner in Los Angeles and perhaps one or two other facilities had CD mastering engineers.

I remember hearing my first CDs then and thinking that the removal of hiss, crackles and wow and flutter (speed irregularities) was a good thing but the sound of the instruments themselves was not the great improvement it was promoted as being. In fact, I found my vinyl records to much more closely represent what I was used to hearing in the studio.

Over the years, some significant improvements in CD sound quality followed, from better players, more successfully able to reproduce the sound of the digital CD master to better CD mastering gear. When Atlantic installed Apogees retrofit filters in the Sony mastering gear, there was a nice step up in sonics but I still felt there was a long way to go.

In order to do the best job I could, I set about making some improvements in the mastering room, starting with the monitoring. I had the studio replace the little box speakers in the room with a pair of Dahlquist DQ-10s, later followed by DQ-20s. I treated the reflection points on the walls with absorbent material and brought my own cables to work every day in order to bypass the console, switching, patch bay and other standard accoutrements of a typical mastering room. Typically, I would wire directly from the output of the Studer reel-to-reel deck to the input of the Sony 1630 A-D converters. If I felt some EQ was necessary, Id add only the EQ, with nothing else in the signal path.

"By the mid-1990s I realized that many clients were starting to evaluate my work using the level meters instead of the loudspeakers."

In 1987, I left Atlantic to form BDA and worked primarily as an independent CD mastering engineer. I worked out of a few different studios, choosing them based on my assessment of the monitoring accuracy. By the mid-1990s I realized that many clients were starting to evaluate my work using the level meters instead of the loudspeakers. At this point, I had to stop and ask myself just what I sought to accomplish as an audio engineer.

Now, I enjoy loudness when it is appropriate but in my experience, if you want to shake the walls with AC/DC (or with Mahler), the best way to achieve this is with the playback volume control. Any other way, such as arbitrarily increasing the level on the recording itself involves a host of sonic trade-offs. First among them, is the sense of Life that comes from musical dynamics. Since my goals as an engineer are sourced in my love of music, I didnt want to participate in the ongoing Loudness Wars. All the truly great sounding records and CDs in my collection had much lower average levels than what the majors were releasing. I wanted to preserve all the musical Life in every source I mastered too and never used compression myself. While some say it increases punch, the sonic evidence tells a quite different story. Besides, how does one increase punch by reducing dynamics, where the punch lives? So, I started accepting only those jobs where the clients prime interest was the musical presentation and the preservation of musical dynamics.

I also started to think more about the Questions I mentioned earlier. I asked myself if I ever wanted to listen to a great piano player with my head under the lid of a grand piano and my ears just inches above the hammers. Or if I wanted to listen to a ripping guitar solo with my ear up against the grill cloth of a Marshall (amplifier) stack. Or a great horn player with my ear in the bell of the horn. How about a great vocalist with my ear an inch from their lips? This in fact, is where the mics in a typical studio recording listen from. I realized that those recordings I found truly amazing sonically used considerably fewer microphones and none were ever placed as close to what they were capturing as is done in a typical studio recording.

I came to realize that 90-95% of a recordings ultimate sound quality has already been determined by the time the signals are leaving the microphones. This was the genesis of Soundkeeper Recordings. I knew then that my greatest interest in audio and recording is in making records that give the listener the feeling they are in the presence of the performance, in the room where the performance took place.

To be clear, there is a very large library of recorded music that I love, which was made using the typical studio techniques involving multiple, closely placed microphones. Over the years, the recording art has evolved to the point where musical magic can be created which bears little relationship to the original performance. Wonderful and magical as many of these recordings are, they were made to sound like "records"; my goal is to explore the idea of records that sound like performances. Two different approaches, each with its own rewards.

Soundkeeper Recordings are made with all the musicians playing live, in real time. In order to keep the signals as coherent as possible, there is only one microphone per playback channel. The mics are arranged in a stereo array and are separated by a baffle of my own design. Musical balances are achieved by moving players and instruments physically, rather than moving faders on a mixing console. The recordings are captured in stereo with no overdubs or further processing. What leaves the microphones is essentially the finished recording. (Because I record with a lot of headroom, final levels are adjusted in the mastering room.) The results sound very much like what I hear when standing at the position of the microphone array at the recording sessions.

Provenance is a main concern for many HD download customers. Some people would like this provenance information to include things like what generation master tape was used for a given reissue. This is certainly a new requirement as I'm not aware of many LPs or CDs that provide this information. In your experience, how often is it the case that an album, regardless of format, was created from the original master tape and why is this important?

The first issue of an album is generally created from the original master. In the case of huge sellers, there will often be subsequent masterings. This is particularly true for vinyl because the vinyl lacquer created in the mastering room is only good for the production of so many mothers used for creating of the final pressings.

"What this means is that with hit albums, there is no guarantee a given purchased copy was mastered from the original master tapes."

In vinyl mastering, it has been common practice to make a separate tape recording during the initial mastering stage, which contains the same signal sent to the cutting lathe. In other words, this separate tape recording would capture the level adjustments, EQ and any other processing the mastering engineer uses while cutting the lacquer. The labels would keep this EQd copy (or EQd limited copy) and use these when subsequent lacquers are required. These could be cut flat (i.e., with no further alteration) and reflect the changes made during the original mastering. What this means is that with hit albums, there is no guarantee a given purchased copy was mastered from the original master tapes.

Aside from EQd copies created during mastering, sometimes the label is not in possession of the original mixed tapes. This is something I encountered a lot while at Atlantic. The originals might be in a musicians private library or they might be in an overseas tape library. The label receives a flat copy of the original tape for use in creating the records or CDs they sell.

Is this important? There is no hard answer. A well made analog tape copy will exhibit a slight increase in background hiss and perhaps a very slight loss of transient speed. However, in my experience, these are of much smaller magnitude than the changes the mastering engineer is going to make. The question is much like asking whether purchasing produce from a gourmet shop will produce a better meal than purchasing it from a supermarket. If all other things are equal, I believe the answer would likely be yes. But all other things are rarely equal. If two different chefs prepare meals from the same ingredients, the results will often be quite different. Personally, Id rather choose the chef than the ingredients. Put another way, Id rather listen to a record George Piros mastered from a third generation copy than some other engineer might have mastered from the original studio mixes.

"Put another way, Id rather listen to a record George Piros mastered from a third generation copy than some other engineer might have mastered from the original studio mixes."

To the issue of provenance, I believe what many folks really want to know is less about what mic cable was used in the original recording and more about whether the resolution of the download they are purchasing is truly the resolution it is purported to be. Is it really 24/96 or really 24/192? Or is it merely 16/44 (CD resolution) delivered in a high resolution package?

On your Soundkeeper Recordings site, you recommend CD-Rs over CDs for those buyers who will play back their music on a transport or player yet you also recommend the CD for those buyers that intend to rip their music to hard drive. Could you explain why a CD-R is better than a CD when spinning a disc and why this difference doesn't matter when ripping and playing back from hard drive?

I wish I could explain why. Ive read a number of theories and some of them may or may not make sense.

From my earliest days in CD mastering, I always noticed that the finished CDs from different replication facilities all sound different from each other and none sounds indistinguishable from the CD master used to make it. Often, CDs made on different production lines within the same plant dont sound like each other either. In all cases, there is a loss of focus and fine detail, usually subtle, sometimes not so subtle.

When it came time to choose a plant to do Soundkeepers CDs, I spoke with a few dozen facilities. The one I ultimately chose was the only one which, without any prompting from me, did not claim their CDs sound exactly like the masters. It turns out, their CDs are the closest in my experience. I can still distinguish between the CD and the master from which it was made but with their discs, I need a synchronized playback against the master to discern the differences.

This plant cuts the glass master (the first step in CD production) in real time, instead of the more typical 4x or faster used by most other facilities nowadays. They also use a ~9 second injection molding cycle, rather than the more common ~4 second cycle. Whether these account for why their discs are more faithful, I dont know. Some say procedures like this make for better formed pits in the disc, making it easier for the player to read the disc with less jitter (i.e., timing errors). I dont know if this is the case but I do know I like the results.

With a well made CD-R (burned at relatively slow speed on a high quality blank), I find the results of playback in a CD transport or player sound closer to the CD master than even the best pressings in my experience.

I think something similar occurs with processes such as SHM, Blu-Spec and HQCD, where the processes are different from usual and sometimes the materials in the disc itself are different. I recently compared some of these with their plain CD counterparts. I was pretty surprised by the degree of difference I heard and found it to be so obvious, I would have bet I was listening to two different masterings, with different EQ!

To prove this, I extracted both the special disc and the plain CD to computer hard drive so I could perform a null test. In a null test, two digital files are synchronized (to the sample) and mixed together. The polarity of one of the files is reversed. What results is that everything the two files have in common, i.e., what is the same in the files, is cancelled (or nulled), leaving only what is different between the files. To my surprise, the result of the null test was dead silence. Listening to the two files from the computer resulted in both sounding indistinguishable from each other. It was a slightly clearer version of the better disc heard from the CD player. Whether commercial CD, special material or process CD or a fine CD-R, my experience has consistently been that extraction to computer and playback from there (as a raw PCM file in .aif or .wav format) gets me the true sound of the master.

"What I do know is that as an audio enthusiast, Ive always wanted to hear the master at home. With computer audio, this is finally a reality."

What is the difference between playback from a transport or player and playback from the computer? To create a CD, those ones and zeros of digital code must be further encoded, using a scheme referred to as 8:14 modulation. This is used to create the nine different length pits and land (the space between the pits) on the finished disc. Among other things, the player must spin the disc at the correct speed, track the spiral of pits, keeping the laser properly focused, read the disc, decode the 8:14 modulation, decode the resulting binary code, apply any necessary error correction, convert it to stereo analog signals and feed it to the outputs, often using a common power supply for all these functions. The computer, given something like a raw PCM file in .aif or .wav format, has a much simpler job. Whether all this accounts for the audible differences, I dont know for sure. What I do know is that as an audio enthusiast, Ive always wanted to hear the master at home. With computer audio, this is finally a reality.

With this in mind, if computer playback is the goal, the advantages CD-R has in transports and players are no longer there, hence, my recommendation of the less expensive CD to Soundkeeper customers who listen via their computers.

You have been vocal about your preference for recording, as well as delivering, your Soundkeeper Recordings in 24-bit/192kHz format. Why 24/192?

The reason is because I feel properly done 24/192 crosses a very important threshold. Over the years, Ive used all sorts of analog recorders and digital recorders but the output of these devices was always quite different sounding from the signal they received at their input.

Even the best 24/96 digital Ive heard, while certainly much better than 16/44 CD in terms of fidelity the input signal, still sounds very different to me than the input that is coming directly from the microphones.

"For the first time in my experience, those reservations I have always had about digital, where I felt there were some things the best analog did better, simply evaporated."

When I first heard properly done 24/192, it was a jaw dropper. For the first time in my experience, those reservations I have always had about digital, where I felt there were some things the best analog did better, simply evaporated. This is, to my ears, a bigger jump up in quality over 24/96 than that was over 16/44. It no longer feels like a great digital recorder or a great analog recorder. It feels like the recorder has been effectively removed from the equation and I am listening directly to the mic feed.

I mention properly done 24/192 because Ive heard a number of converters with these numbers on their spec sheet, which actually sound worse to me at this rate than they do at 24/96. This, I attribute to the significantly increased demands made by the higher rates on clocking accuracy and for wide band performance from the analog stages.

When the higher rates are well executed, the results are simply magical. Though I hear it throughout the range, perhaps surprisingly, I find many of its benefits particularly audible in the bass. The only downside Ive found so far is that I can no longer blame the gear for any flaws in my recordings. Of those, I must take full ownership.

There is continued discussion and controversy over dynamic range compression. Mainly, how do we know if a given recording has been compressed to the point of not being worth listening to or buying. Some people are using sites like the "Unofficial Dynamic Range Database" to gauge the level of dynamic compression used in a given recording and to help inform their purchase decisions. Do you have any advice for how to interpret things like a "DR Value" and generally does loudness, which you've written about, automatically equate to a poor sounding recording?

I very much applaud the efforts of the folks behind the Dynamic Range Database. I have long felt that preservation of musical dynamics (as opposed to their eradication in the ongoing Loudness Wars) is one of the last frontiers in recorded sound.

That said, I would hesitate to assign quality to a recording based on a number. While a low number will certainly indicate what many, including myself, would deem an undesirable curtailing of dynamics, a high number, in my view, is no guarantee of quality. It is important to remember tests like this are looking at only one aspect of what is a complex reality. For example, who cares if the dynamic range is high if the treble has been boosted to the point of being able to loosen dental fillings?

"Ultimately, in order to evaluate a recording, particularly how any individual might feel about that recording, I dont know of any substitute for actually listening."

As to whether loudness automatically equates to a poor sounding recording, I think this is a matter of degree. I have some recordings I consider good sounding but which are still compromised, in my opinion, by dynamic compression. I can only wonder how theyd sound if their dynamics were left unhindered. Personally, I think theyd be better but I should add that these recordings were not at all eviscerated to the point that many others are nowadays.

Ultimately, in order to evaluate a recording, particularly how any individual might feel about that recording, I dont know of any substitute for actually listening.

Beyond dynamic range and provenance, are there other important factors people should factor in when making music purchase decisions with an ear toward sound quality?

Keeping in mind that it is possible to have a high DR rating, with the source being the original recording itself and still end up with something that doesnt sound very good, were back to listening as the only real way to tell.

I think it would be a mistake to interpret a DR rating of 20 as, in and of itself, being better than a rating of 19. If they are two versions of the same recording, Id want to know the recording and mastering engineer for each, as that would tell me more than the numbers ever could.

Still, in the end, the recording has no other purpose than to be listened to, so Id rather hear a sample in order to know if I want to buy it.

Some audiophiles have a stated preference for a direct-from-master approach, meaning no EQ applied during the final mastering process. Is this the ideal?

In most cases, I would say it is not. While I understand and appreciate the sentiment, this is invariably suggested by folks who have not heard many (perhaps any) masters.

When I first started as an engineer, having been an audiophile first, I too believed EQ is bad and that all masters should be transferred flat (with no alteration). Then I learned how most records are really made and got to hear how many masters really sound.

One must consider the microphones used in most recordings and the colorations they bring to the results. Combine this with where the mics are placed (generally in places where the listener would not want to place their ear) and the fact that the signal will then be sent over long lengths of not-so-great cables, through dozens and dozens of switches and patch points and then adjusted to make the result, played back on not-so-great monitoring, sound right, is it any surprise that most recordings need help?

"Another thing to keep in mind is that there is EQ and there is EQ; I think it took me 15 years to learn how to use it invisibly."

Put another way, if Ive got a master that sounds thin, with a treble hyped to the point of keeping insects away and I can make the results sound less painful with EQ, I would find EQ to be quite a good thing. Another thing to keep in mind is that there is EQ and there is EQ; I think it took me 15 years to learn how to use it invisibly. The idea is, for example, to bring out the bite in a horn section, not to bring out 5 kHz. All too often, when we hear an EQd program, we hear the EQ more than we hear what it was trying to accomplish program-wise.

All that said, with some recordings, there is no need for EQ. Ive worked with mixes that came in sounding so right, they needed absolutely nothing. And with some recordings, which were made with the intention of capturing life - usually the minimally micd, purist recordings - there is also no need for EQ. In such cases, if no minor level adjustments are necessary, a straight from the master approach is the one Id choose.

I've seen you mention George Piros, the mastering engineer, on a number of occasions and was wondering if you could tell us a little about your experiences with him and why he's made such a lasting impression.

I had the very good fortune to work with George when we were both at Atlantic. He would often tell me of his days with Bob Fine and Wilma Cozart and the work they all did on the Mercury recordings, which I only later came to hear and then to love so much.

George is one of my engineering heroes, being one of the only mastering engineers I ever met who did not routinely add a compressor or limiter to his signal path. In fact, I never saw him patch one into his mastering channel.

I spent many an afternoon in his mastering room, watching him work and discussing audio and music. George always called it as he heard it, no matter who he was speaking with. I loved his directness and his passion. And no matter what, he always served the music.

One memory that will always stay with me came from a time shortly before George retired. I was walking past the outside of the padded, double-door airlock outside Georges room and heard some rocking music coming from inside. I entered the room and saw George bent over the lathe, peering into the microscope, looking at a groove he was cutting in a test lacquer... while AC/DC played at a level that could peel the paint from the walls.

Through George, I also got to meet Bert Whyte and Joe Grado, both of whom came up to Georges mastering room to work with him and share audio stories.

In addition to being involved on the recording and mastering side, you are also an audiophile. Do you think this helps inform some the choices you make in the recording studio?

It has always been key in everything Ive done as an engineer. From the realization of the critical importance of monitors and their setup to all the other components in the chain, being an audiophile has helped me develop as an engineer.

"It is why, when on an AES panel of CD mastering engineers in the early 80s, mine may have been the only voice in the room to (shyly at the time) declare my vinyl records still brought me closer to the music."

It has shaped my sensibilities in terms of what I want to achieve in my work and is the reason I refused to take part in the Loudness Wars. It is why, when on an AES panel of CD mastering engineers in the early 80s, mine may have been the only voice in the room to (shyly at the time) declare my vinyl records still brought me closer to the music.

And it is what led me to form Soundkeeper Recordings, where I believe Ive done my best work to date.

Are there an upcoming projects you'd like to share with us?

With Paul Beaudry & Pathways Americas released just last month, Im still in the promo phase for that project but there are a few new ones under consideration, which might come to pass later this year and see release in the next.

One is a reggae project - perhaps the worlds first purist reggae recording. Ive also proposed a project with a young alto saxophone player I heard last month, who really entranced me with his playing. Im always on the lookout for artists whose music moves me and who are interested in trying the recording without a net approach."

kurtster

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Location: where fear is not a virtue
Gender: Male


Posted: Apr 14, 2021 - 9:31am

 ColdMiser wrote:
 kurtster wrote:

So to keep myself busy and out of trouble, I have dived back into the vinyl full tilt.  Sold 4 albums in the past week and was just contacted by someone seeking me out to digitize / archive some of his vinyl. Just brought back into service my AT15SS cart with a brand new AT20Sla stylus. The music sounds so good again.  Yep, I'm wearing them out and these don't grow on trees anymore. Got a counter to keep track of the number of album sides played.   Also just found a new old stock AT20Sla cart/stylus and jumped on it.  The wife was even ok with it as she knows what it is and how rare.  Have one more NOS AT20N stylus sitting.  Might get one more to make sure I get to the finish line in the manner I've become accustomed to. Those 4 albums will help out now a lot.    And so it goes.


Where do you sell your vinyl Kurt? Discogs?
 
Yes, on Discogs.  My store.

I will sell direct to and discount for RPeeps.  Just sold my first press of The Wall, The Doors Waiting For The Sun on 45 RPM, The 50th of Lola and the Steven Wilson remix of Tull's Stand Up.

I try to add 3 to 5 albums a month to keep listings above 50 albums.  They all need to be play graded and ripped before listing.  Very time consuming but it is what I do.  And then when I buy something new, I have to drop what I am doing and play them immediately to make sure that they are acceptable.  50% have been unacceptable as of late and returns are a real PITA.  I am reripping The Doors album right now before it goes out the door because of the new stylus.

My collection from which I am pulling from.  Many have been sold but I keep them in my collection so I can refer to what the version is and the track listings.  Half of my collection is still unlisted.  Time is hard to manage anymore.
ColdMiser

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Posted: Apr 14, 2021 - 7:19am

 kurtster wrote:

So to keep myself busy and out of trouble, I have dived back into the vinyl full tilt.  Sold 4 albums in the past week and was just contacted by someone seeking me out to digitize / archive some of his vinyl.

Just brought back into service my AT15SS cart with a brand new AT20Sla stylus. The music sounds so good again.  Yep, I'm wearing them out and these don't grow on trees anymore. Got a counter to keep track of the number of album sides played.   Also just found a new old stock AT20Sla cart/stylus and jumped on it.  The wife was even ok with it as she knows what it is and how rare.  Have one more NOS AT20N stylus sitting.  Might get one more to make sure I get to the finish line in the manner I've become accustomed to. Those 4 albums will help out now a lot.    And so it goes.


Where do you sell your vinyl Kurt? Discogs?

kurtster

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Posted: Apr 13, 2021 - 6:50pm

So to keep myself busy and out of trouble, I have dived back into the vinyl full tilt.  Sold 4 albums in the past week and was just contacted by someone seeking me out to digitize / archive some of his vinyl.

Just brought back into service my AT15SS cart with a brand new AT20Sla stylus. The music sounds so good again.  Yep, I'm wearing them out and these don't grow on trees anymore. Got a counter to keep track of the number of album sides played.   Also just found a new old stock AT20Sla cart/stylus and jumped on it.  The wife was even ok with it as she knows what it is and how rare.  Have one more NOS AT20N stylus sitting.  Might get one more to make sure I get to the finish line in the manner I've become accustomed to. Those 4 albums will help out now a lot.    And so it goes.
kurtster

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Location: where fear is not a virtue
Gender: Male


Posted: Feb 9, 2021 - 10:45pm

Moved from the Sade thread.
ScottFromWyoming wrote:
 
I know it was a chronic problem with standard LPs back when I was buying them, but I'm a little surprised that modern vinyl QC—especially in a box set—lets anything but perfect specimens leave the plant.

  
QC is almost worse today then back in the old days.  To get a flawless box set these days is the exception rather than the rule.  There are very few pressing plants still operating with the biggest and the worst being GZ Media in the Czech Republic.  They are quite capable of doing a good job, but cut corners based on the clients dictates which in most cases these days is UMG or Universal Music Group, which owns damn near everything now.  

Here are the reviews of GZ Media as a company.  https://www.discogs.com/label/430654-GZ-Media/reviews

It is very pathetic and discouraging when you have to do your due diligence to see who is doing the pressing before buying and then finding out who is doing something you really want.  Then you have to buy them from someone who will deal with the returns.  Amazon is the first obvious choice, then Music Direct for MOFI's and generally higher end releases, but not always.  https://www.popmarket.com/ is the other major player, and returns do ok there.

Lastly is the  UMG's store front down in Virginia that shares the same building with Music Today, which is where I bought the Sade box set.

Here is what the BBB has on them.  https://www.bbb.org/us/va/crozet/profile/music/udiscover-music-us-store-0603-63411757

I have an ongoing problem with a return that is lost on their loading dock since December 16.  Called the local PO and they admitted that they dropped the ball and that this happens all the time down there.

Now I'm about to deal with Music Today on the SADE set.  I'm thrilled, not.

https://www.bbb.org/us/va/crozet/profile/music/musictoday-ii-llc-0603-63410621

I still have these tabs open from my UMG experience back in November and ongoing.

The list of box sets that I have bought mostly over the past 3 years is pretty big and it has been more misses than hits.  I get them because at this point in my life they are most likely to have what I still want in one place, hopefully with a high sound quality and also hold their value over time and even appreciate in price, even though opened and played.  On the other hand with all of these known problems, a play graded and verified trouble free set increases in value and is more resalable than a sealed crap shoot.

Known problems sets include: 

PF Pulse, have two only went halfway through one and got bummed out, the other one sits sealed.  Bought them from Amazon.jp hoping to get the EU version, got the USA instead.
John Lennon's recent, went through two copies to build one good one.  From popmarket.
Steven Wilson's Yes remixes.  Bought three to end up with two good sets.  From Amazon.com
Abbey Road 50th  Got two kept one.
Electric Ladyland 50th Again two to make one.  Music Direct.
The Beatles 50th Initially two copies exchanged one kept two, one open and one stupidly still sealed.

The good stuff:
Tom Petty's Volume One
Tom Petty's Volume Two.  Two copies, one open, one sealed.
TP Wildflowers and All The Rest  Two copies one open and a disc damaged when cleaning
CCR Studio Albums
Rolling Stones In Mono
Buffalo Springfield
George Harrison All thing Must Pass

Sitting unopened and unknown:
Steven Wilson Home Invasion Live.  Read the reviews and they were all good.
Hendrix at Maui 50th.  Taking a chance.  Not enough time and not in the mood yet.
Doors Soft Parade 50th Same as above.

The other real problem is that you have 30 days to verify whether or not you're gonna keep them, so you must play them, especially with the money involved.  That is in real time, too.  Since I rip everything, that involves at least 30 minutes cleaning them and playing each side at least three times.  If I miss the 30 day window, then if I get burned, I can buy a new set and swap the defective one, but if the replacement set is bogus, then I still end up with a bogus set.

So I bought the Sade box set based on the mention here at RP and rolled the dice.  Both me and the OP got bogus sets, but at least I can get my money back and still have the sound and repair it and enjoy it with a mouse click down the road.  He is not so lucky.  He gets neither. It ain't easy, but with practice it has gotten much easier.  Already I have over 300 markers on the one side of the problem Sade album and I am only a third of the way through after about 6 hours.  But when I'm done you'll never know there was a problem with the pressing.

But this is what I do.  This was planned as my retirement hobby 40 years ago.  This is also the perfect thing to do to occupy my time constructively during this lockdown.  I did the stamp thing as a kid, even got the Merit Badge (really) but this is so much better.  And the results are even better than I could have ever hoped for.  Just coming here to RP way back when put me into contact with people who are just as much into music as I am and have met people here who have furthered my skills and knowledge to do this.  hippie taught me how to use the software, in person at his home in Portland which I traveled to twice.  BG has also shared some knowledge and feedback over the years that have helped me improve my efforts to this end.  The last lesson was the actual volume of the track itself, keeping things under a certain Db level to keep the sound and dynamics as much intact as possible.  That was the turning point for my final approach to getting this stuff right and having some sort of consistency throughout my remasters.

With the world going nutz and the USPS stopping to work properly after Thanksgiving, I shut down my store on Discogs and went back into my pile of rips.  So far since then and beginning in January I have ripped the Sade box, done four whole albums by individual track and and another two album sides of Allman Bros and some individual songs for a total of 52 individual tracks with about 1 man hour per track.  And put together a couple of mixtapes, too.  Then I have to squeeze in real world quality listening time to review my work, mostly while driving, which isn't as much these days.  Got to hear this stuff in other places besides the studio.

So now the USPS is up and running again, so I have to start ripping again just so I can keep my little store stocked.  I've gone through most of the good stuff and now have to go deep into stuff that I haven't played or heard in maybe 40 years in some cases.  Got to get into the mood for a lot of this stuff, so then it becomes more work than fun.  But again, I'm rediscovering the deep forgotten stuff in the process.

I've been ripping while composing this so I have plenty of time to occupy during the process.  That and this is my journal thread, too.  Notes for the future.

FWIW, of the few remaining fears in life that I still have, one of the biggest is the thought of having to buy a new cartridge.  If nothing else, besides rolling the dice on a new sound, it's at least 50 hours of wasted playing time just breaking in a new one.  I've got some back up carts, but ...  I'm sure that the one I'm using now is well into middle age and maybe another 500 hours left if I'm lucky.  If nothing else, Shibata's last the longest of any stylus type, up to 3,000 hours if you keep the vinyl clean and everything properly aligned. I really, really ♥ my AT Shibata's. 

https://www.discogs.com/user/kurts.ear.candy/collection?search=box+set
KurtfromLaQuinta

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Location: Really deep in the heart of South California
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Posted: Jan 10, 2021 - 7:37pm



 kurtster wrote:
Been really busy being overwhelmed by life and everything else for far too long lately.  And letting things get by and slowly build up to must do situations.


 
Music is a drug...
I, too, am addicted.


rhahl

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Posted: Jan 10, 2021 - 9:27am

Check this out. Restoring old music.
 
 
and
 
https://mobile.twitter.com/dusttodigital
kurtster

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Location: where fear is not a virtue
Gender: Male


Posted: Oct 19, 2020 - 9:36pm

Been really busy being overwhelmed by life and everything else for far too long lately.  And letting things get by and slowly build up to must do situations.

My music must deal with this now problem happened Saturday night when trying to save a 200 mb rip I got the message that this format was too large to save.  The partition size is 1.23 TB.  Alrighty then.  A time of reckoning.  Let it be known that every time I drop the needle, I hit record.  Let it also be known that for at least the past 15 years my turntable has been plugged into an ADC digital preamp with a USB out to a computer and the only actual analogue anything that I have heard since then is AM radio broadcasts.  Since I got my SL 1200, I must have acquired nearly 2 TB of wav files.  They are all grouped in files relating to a certain part of the progress of my improvements and tweaks.  In many of these folders are files of albums I no longer have and they are all I have left, regardless of how good they are.  Culling these folders and files for these files is a long term project, but dealing with a full partition is an immediate problem, especially since I must keep playing and ripping to keep my little store at Discogs with stuff in it.  That and I'm still getting new vinyl, mostly box sets and they have to be played immediately in order to see if they have defects and can be returned in time for refund or replacement.  I just went through two copies of the most recent Lennon Box with 8 sides each and each side played 3 times. 2 x 8 X 3 = 48 rips in real time, being forced to stay put and listen for defects on at least the first playing of each side.  With cleaning averaging 30 minutes per side there are nearly 2 man hours for every side that gets cleaned and ripped.  So these Lennon boxes have somewhere between 24 to 32 man hours involved.  Probably 28.  One is defective and must go back.  There is a huge problem with Side A on many pressings, which effectively ruins the set even if the other 7 sides are excellent, which they are.  It was pressed in the well known shit plant in the Czech Republic.  Got to open em up and play them.  Can't take a chance of having a crappy sealed copy kept as an investment.  And now I have to deal with returning the set and deciding to refund or replace.  The way this box set has been released a known good copy could double in price in a year or two.  Decisions, decisions, yeah a first world problem but this is what I do now to ride out the rest of my life.

So Sunday afternoon I decided to tackle the most recent rips and collate and delete copies of files of rips that have been superseded by a new and what is finally the last rip at the highest level I can get.  But being the digital pack rat that I am, I'm just letting go the metadata and extra rips of the same track.  I usually keep 3 copies of each album side, the second take / playback and the third and then a Work In Progress (WIP) version of the third rip that I use for click removal and editing.  Always keep a raw copy of what you are working with in case you fuck up or corrupt a file that you're working on so you can always start over.  Bytes are cheap.

The rest of Sunday until the wee hours of Monday morning was spent going through nearly everything in two folders, one about 300 GB and the new primary nearly 600 GB. And then I needed to defrag the partition and needed to get 15% free space in order to be able to do that. In the end I ended up with a 700 GB folder with 768 folders and 4,003 files.  I deleted about 200 GB of files and metadata going through every last file.  I was hitting shift and control so much that I had to get a pot holder to place under my left wrist to help me finish.  I was determined to get this done so I would not get into this mess again anytime soon.  I also need another 2 TB HD to replace my last 1TB which is getting up there in hours.  That would take me to 8 + TB.  And a separate 3TB NAS that I need to do more with.

So I got it done hitting defrag and going to bed and see what happened in the morning.  Now what I have in this folder is organized and someone who ended up with it after I was gone and could not explain what is in it could figure it out and make sense of it and realize that it just might be a treasure and worth keeping.  I do have a plan to distribute the best of  these album sides that I have finished so they do not end up in a dumpster.  I have found that 128 GB flash drives are not very expensive anymore.  Stay tuned ...
kurtster

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Location: where fear is not a virtue
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 6, 2020 - 2:42pm

 ColdMiser wrote:


 ScottFromWyoming wrote:


 I met someone over at discogs who also lives in Powell. Big into vinyl and preservation.
{#Cheers}If you had stopped with just that, there's no way it could be anyone but Dave! Actually, just "discogs" and he's the first one I thought of. You two would definitely get along.... And Grady (the guy who made the table) and his brother would get along. Both tinkerer/inventors. Not sure how Dave and his brother wound up so un-alike.
 
I'm on a few Vinyl Facebook pages that Dave Rose is VERY active on. His collection is mind boggling. He occasionally posts pictures of his listening digs. A converted 2 car garage that has library like storage complete with rolling ladders. He listed once the quantity of his stuff and it was pretty astounding, I forget the numbers. Cool to see him mentioned here in the RP forum.

 
He is pretty active on Discogs.  Nice guy and very helpful with the myriad of questions that pop up all the time.

He got the house and the records.  Not an easy thing to do. 

Probably has forgotten more than I will ever know regarding vinyl or music in general for that matter.
kurtster

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Location: where fear is not a virtue
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 6, 2020 - 11:48am

 kcar wrote:

Congrats on your recent good fortune! I hope it continues. I don't blame you for avoiding eBay: the few times I've used it have often led to disputes and sellers trying to rip me off...

Now, not everything between the two of us has to take a political turn but this bit from your post made me snort-chuckle:
CV 19 has turned this little world totally upside down with international shipping almost at a screeching halt. The USPS is one of the last somewhat functional postal services left on the planet. And it has suffered greatly too but limps along for better or worse.
Could you pass that thought on to Trump? 'Cause he's trying to break USPS.
 
Thank you.

We have been discussing the international postal crisis at length on Discogs since March and well before that actually as shipping rates are skyrocketing world wide.  I don't do politics over there although there are a few who try and start things there.

With the USPS, it's more of a manpower thing than anything else.  People keep getting sick and go out for weeks at a time, disrupting the system. I've learned about the various hubs and transfer points and at times some are all but shut down due to CV 19.  The funding is not that much of a problem, yet. There is also a lot of talk about privatizing the USPS but not much lately.

And now I must go to see my favorite mail lady at the PO and drop off two albums.  I always let her know what they are as she takes them in across the counter.  Last time she said, you sure have a lot of albums and I replied, yeah, I could have had a down payment for a house if I never bought all these albums. Today, it's Japanese pressings of BOC Agents of Fortune and Tommy.  Two of my recent rip and flips.
kcar

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Posted: Aug 6, 2020 - 11:01am



 kurtster wrote:
Verlllly interwesting ...

My little record store thingy on Discogs is really starting to get busy.  My free time is being taken over by now having to rip and re rip in many cases and play grade my stuff to keep stuff in the store for sale.  I'm trying to catch up on stuff I've had listed for a long time now before someone buys it.  More than a couple of times in the past few weeks I've had to drop what I'm doing and go pull an album and knock it out so that it can leave the building and me having a rip that I can live with.  I still miss some that I sold before system improvements but, Oh well.  Seller's remorse.  It was hard to get to Oh well, but I'm getting better slowly. The new stabilizing ring mentioned below has helped with a new found enjoyment of the sound I'm getting which makes things more fun again.

The bonus part is that I have come up with a term called "rip and flip" where I state that I bought the album, cleaned it, ripped it and am reselling it at my break even price, which I am.  These are starting to move now, much to the wife's delight ... 

CV 19 has turned this little world totally upside down with international shipping almost at a screeching halt.  The USPS is one of the last somewhat functional postal services left on the planet.  And it has suffered greatly too but limps along for better or worse.  There are endless tales of packages taking 3 or 4 months to move from certain countries to other countries.  The lists of what country will not ship to which country are constantly being changed.  The international postal accord is falling apart with rumours of the USA withdrawing completely.  The tales coming from Canadian sellers just trying to do business in only Canada are having fits with all the variables including distances.  The UK to the EU and vice versa is now more fun, not, especially with the VAT's involved.  Fortunately for me, the USA is still a huge market, Media Mail is still reasonable and I have a lot of imported stuff that few have here stateside, so those are now moving.

It is keeping me busy and off the streets.  And I'm learning more about shipping than I ever wanted to learn.

Lastly and worsely, Discogs is going through some drastic changes that will take full effect October 1st when automatic shipping policies are required and Pay Pal will become the only acceptable form of payment.  There is a possible mass self delisting of small seller inventories in protest come the first of September which I plan to take part in.  It could be another fun while it lasted thing, because the changes are so short sighted and limiting with certain countries forbidding the use of Pay Pal and in the EU, it is forbidden to only accept one form of payment for online market places.

With that in mind, I'm going to be a ripping and listing fool to get it while I can !

and no, I don't want to go to E bay.

So iffen you're looking for any hard copies of music, act fast.  The good stuff will soon be gone for a very long time and may never be easily found again anytime soon.
 

Congrats on your recent good fortune! I hope it continues. I don't blame you for avoiding eBay: the few times I've used it have often led to disputes and sellers trying to rip me off...

Now, not everything between the two of us has to take a political turn but this bit from your post made me snort-chuckle:


CV 19 has turned this little world totally upside down with international shipping almost at a screeching halt. The USPS is one of the last somewhat functional postal services left on the planet. And it has suffered greatly too but limps along for better or worse.


Could you pass that thought on to Trump? 'Cause he's trying to break USPS.
ColdMiser

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Location: On the Trail
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 6, 2020 - 7:13am



 ScottFromWyoming wrote:


 I met someone over at discogs who also lives in Powell. Big into vinyl and preservation.
{#Cheers}
If you had stopped with just that, there's no way it could be anyone but Dave! Actually, just "discogs" and he's the first one I thought of. You two would definitely get along.... And Grady (the guy who made the table) and his brother would get along. Both tinkerer/inventors. Not sure how Dave and his brother wound up so un-alike.
 
I'm on a few Vinyl Facebook pages that Dave Rose is VERY active on. His collection is mind boggling. He occasionally posts pictures of his listening digs. A converted 2 car garage that has library like storage complete with rolling ladders. He listed once the quantity of his stuff and it was pretty astounding, I forget the numbers. Cool to see him mentioned here in the RP forum.

kurtster

kurtster Avatar

Location: where fear is not a virtue
Gender: Male


Posted: Aug 6, 2020 - 1:21am

Verlllly interwesting ...

My little record store thingy on Discogs is really starting to get busy.  My free time is being taken over by now having to rip and re rip in many cases and play grade my stuff to keep stuff in the store for sale.  I'm trying to catch up on stuff I've had listed for a long time now before someone buys it.  More than a couple of times in the past few weeks I've had to drop what I'm doing and go pull an album and knock it out so that it can leave the building and me having a rip that I can live with.  I still miss some that I sold before system improvements but, Oh well.  Seller's remorse.  It was hard to get to Oh well, but I'm getting better slowly. The new stabilizing ring mentioned below has helped with a new found enjoyment of the sound I'm getting which makes things more fun again.

The bonus part is that I have come up with a term called "rip and flip" where I state that I bought the album, cleaned it, ripped it and am reselling it at my break even price, which I am.  These are starting to move now, much to the wife's delight ... 

CV 19 has turned this little world totally upside down with international shipping almost at a screeching halt.  The USPS is one of the last somewhat functional postal services left on the planet.  And it has suffered greatly too but limps along for better or worse.  There are endless tales of packages taking 3 or 4 months to move from certain countries to other countries.  The lists of what country will not ship to which country are constantly being changed.  The international postal accord is falling apart with rumours of the USA withdrawing completely.  The tales coming from Canadian sellers just trying to do business in only Canada are having fits with all the variables including distances.  The UK to the EU and vice versa is now more fun, not, especially with the VAT's involved.  Fortunately for me, the USA is still a huge market, Media Mail is still reasonable and I have a lot of imported stuff that few have here stateside, so those are now moving.

It is keeping me busy and off the streets.  And I'm learning more about shipping than I ever wanted to learn.

Lastly and worsely, Discogs is going through some drastic changes that will take full effect October 1st when automatic shipping policies are required and Pay Pal will become the only acceptable form of payment.  There is a possible mass self delisting of small seller inventories in protest come the first of September which I plan to take part in.  It could be another fun while it lasted thing, because the changes are so short sighted and limiting with certain countries forbidding the use of Pay Pal and in the EU, it is forbidden to only accept one form of payment for online market places.

With that in mind, I'm going to be a ripping and listing fool to get it while I can !

and no, I don't want to go to E bay.

So iffen you're looking for any hard copies of music, act fast.  The good stuff will soon be gone for a very long time and may never be easily found again anytime soon.
ScottFromWyoming

ScottFromWyoming Avatar

Location: Powell
Gender: Male


Posted: Jul 15, 2020 - 12:54pm



 I met someone over at discogs who also lives in Powell. Big into vinyl and preservation.
{#Cheers}
If you had stopped with just that, there's no way it could be anyone but Dave! Actually, just "discogs" and he's the first one I thought of. You two would definitely get along.... And Grady (the guy who made the table) and his brother would get along. Both tinkerer/inventors. Not sure how Dave and his brother wound up so un-alike.
kurtster

kurtster Avatar

Location: where fear is not a virtue
Gender: Male


Posted: Jul 15, 2020 - 1:19am

 ScottFromWyoming wrote:


 buddy wrote:


 kurtster wrote:
The journey continues.  
 
If you go before I do, I want all your stuff.   

 

My friends just posted this:

May be skipping a lot in 2020 but not skipping records! Watching Vinyl Nation on April 18th, I was determined to listen to more vinyl, starting with The Spinners. Challenge: Breathing while playing records causes everything to jiggle in our place. The Grady Turntable project was born and, just over 6 weeks later, a 128 lb table was bolted to the wall. The inaugural spin, John Doe's "The Golden State" from A Year in the Wilderness.

The project included: Steel, Teflon, titanium, and Sorbothane, plus a new stereo cabinet, new capacitors, cartridge, and feet for the Harman Kardon plus cleaning all switches and contacts, and a new pre-amp.

========================

She shared 45 photos and videos of the project on Facebook but it's a private post. I told her to throw it on her personal website (which is probably actually more private), so we'll see. He custom-built everything, maybe including the feet for the turntable, I'm not sure but I think so.

 

 
That sounds pretty interesting.  Always fun to see how determined people go about solving audio problems.  But the reward for success is worth all the effort.  Ear candy is its own reward.

obtw, I met someone over at discogs who also lives in Powell.  Big into vinyl and preservation.  Says he knows you.  His last name is Rose.  I told him to say kurtster says hello the next time he see's you.  I predicted that you might say something like sorry to hear that in a tongue in cheek way.  {#Wink}  Anyway, it's a small world getting smaller all the time.
{#Cheers}
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