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Bob Marley — Get Up, Stand Up
Album: Live!
Avg rating:
7.1

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1161









Released: 1975
Length: 6:24
Plays (last 30 days): 0
Get up, stand up: stand up for your right
Get up, stand up: stand up for your right
Get up, stand up: stand up for your right
Get up, stand up: don't give up the fight

Preacher man don't tell me,
Heaven is under the earth
I know you don't know
What life is really worth
It's not all that glitters is gold
Half the story has never been told
So now you see the light, eh!
You stand up for your right
Come on!

Get up, stand up: stand up for your right
Get up, stand up: don't give up the fight
Get up, stand up: stand up for your right
Get up, stand up: don't give up the fight

Most people think
Great God will come from the sky,
Take away everything
And make-a everybody feel high
But if you know what life is worth,
You will look for yours on earth
And now you see the light,
You stand up for your rights, jah!

Get up, stand up (Jah, jah)
Stand up for your right (Oh, hoo)
Get up, stand up (Get up, stand up)
Don't give up the fight (Life is your right)
Get up, stand up (So we can't give up the fight)
Stand up for your right (Lord, Lord)
Get up, stand up (Keep us struggling on)
Don't give up the fight, yeah

We sick an' tired of your ism-skism game
Dyin' 'n' goin' to heaven in-a Jesus' name, Lord
We know when we understand
Almighty God is a living man
You can fool some people sometimes,
But you can't fool all the people all the time
So now we see the light (What you gonna do?)
We gonna stand up for our rights (Yeah, jah, jah!)

So you better
Get up, stand up (In the morning, get it up)
Stand up for your right (In the night)
Get up, stand up
Don't give up the fight (Don't give it up, don't give it up)
Get up, stand up (Get up, stand up)
Stand up for your right (Get up, stand up)
Get up, stand up (Don't be a nigger in your neighborhood, yeah)
Don't give up the fight (Get up, stand up)
Get up, stand up (I don't think that should be very good, Lord) (Get up, stand up)
Stand up for your right (Get up, stand up)
Get up, stand up (I said, don't be a nigger in your neighborhood, yeah)
Don't give up the fight
Comments (155)add comment
{#Daisy}{#Cowboy}
 Paul_Williams wrote:
Wow, there are quite a few reggae/Bob Marley haters on here!

The thing is, reggae is all about the rhythm – it’s in the songs, in the singing, in the playing, and, if you wish to, it’s in the dancing too. If you don’t feel the rhythm, though, you won’t get reggae or enjoy it. That doesn’t mean there’s something wrong with you, or with reggae, just that we’re all different.

But please stop urinating on other people’s chips with the tedious “boring”, “too long”, “overplayed” kind of vacuous comments. If you haven’t got something positive or at least enlightening to say about the music could I suggest you press PSD or hop to another station for five minutes?

Love Bob Marley, love reggae, please don’t stop playing it, Radio Paradise! 10/10 for a track that moved me physically and mentally.

That is all!

 
{#Clap}
{#Sunny}
Wow, there are quite a few reggae/Bob Marley haters on here!

The thing is, reggae is all about the rhythm – it’s in the songs, in the singing, in the playing, and, if you wish to, it’s in the dancing too. If you don’t feel the rhythm, though, you won’t get reggae or enjoy it. That doesn’t mean there’s something wrong with you, or with reggae, just that we’re all different.

But please stop urinating on other people’s chips with the tedious “boring”, “too long”, “overplayed” kind of vacuous comments. If you haven’t got something positive or at least enlightening to say about the music could I suggest you press PSD or hop to another station for five minutes?

Love Bob Marley, love reggae, please don’t stop playing it, Radio Paradise! 10/10 for a track that moved me physically and mentally.

That is all!
"As to voting, FDR said it best (I think it was him?)....... "All elections are local and people always vote their pocketbook."

The quote is Tip O'Neill, long time Speaker of the US House.   Wish he were here. 
How about reggae that isn't bob marley.  Rating poorly because this has been overplayed everywhere for my entire life.  It's a fine track but I've heard it enough times for the rest of my life.
 mistabird wrote:
für Bob immer 10   {#Bananajam}

 
Reggae is a style I absolutely do not understand. Bob Marley is for me an eternal 1 ... all his songs sound the  same to me and this nonchalance would make me violent, it makes me want to shake him out of his trance and back to the world. Reggae is numbing in a bad way, my whole person fights it and refuses to be kept in that void. 
So that's where Sting got that from.....
Make it stop mon. Solid 2
 rdo wrote:
 
Just the opposite.  Rock, if it is any good at all, discourages people from acting in concert (sorry the pun).  The US lost the Vietnam war on the battlefield.  No amount of support at home would have won it.  There was a "silent majority" in favor of the war right up until the very end.  Rock can free the mind, yet drugs just lock it back up, so in a way it was a wash.  Too much narcissism, of which there is no shortage in your post.
 
I'd really like to see evidence backing up your claim that "(t)here was a "silent majority" in favor of the war right up until the very end" and no, Dick Nixon's memoirs don't count. Oh and Dick would like his PR soundbite back. 

You might want to check these out: 

https://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/learning_history/vietnam/vietnam_pubopinion.cfm

https://www.gallup.com/poll/18097/iraq-versus-vietnam-comparison-public-opinion.aspx

As this first link indicates, support for the war plummeted after the failed Tet Offensive in January '68.  LBJ was an extraordinarily ambitious and gifted politician but he recognized that he couldn't win re-election, mostly because of Vietnam. He had already been facing increasing protests over Vietnam before Tet, but the images of soldiers struggling to hold Saigon and even the US Embassy compound during the offensive shocked Americans. When Walter Cronkite stated in an on-air assessment during Tet that the war was unwinnable, LBJ exclaimed "If I've lost Cronkite, I've lost Middle America."

Johnson therefore took the unprecedented step of announcing in a nationally broadcasted TV speech on 3/31/68 that "I shall not seek and I will not accept the nomination of my party as your President." Johnson lusted after the presidency his whole life. He won in a massive landslide in '64, so at one time he had widespread voter support. Had LBJ thought there was a way to prosecute the war while winning the American voter back, he would have sold his soul to do so. He knew that he could not accomplish both feats so he simply didn't run in '68. Anger over the war, the splintering of the Democrat vote (due in part to George Wallace's Dixiecrat party) and Johnson's tepid support for Democratic nominee Hubert Humphrey led to Richard Nixon's narrow election in November. 

As the second link indicates, by August '68 a clear majority of Americans (53%) answered in a Gallup poll that it was a mistake to send troops to Vietnam. As early as October 1967, more Americans thought the war was a mistake than than thought the war wasn't a mistake (47%-43%). Majority opposition to the war remained quite strong even up to 2000, the end of the data presented

You wrote "Rock, if it is any good at all, discourages people from acting in concert (sorry the pun).  Rock can free the mind, yet drugs just lock it back up, so in a way it was a wash.  Too much narcissism, of which there is no shortage in your post."

 I vigorously disagree. Much of the protest for social and political change during the 50s, 60s and 70s found voice and solidarity in the music of those decades and earlier ones. Good rock can pull people together and effect positive change. 
für Bob immer 10   {#Bananajam}
This song has about 1:43 worth of staying power. After that this gets tiresome and grating. Small, small doses folks.
Here's to the late great Peter Tosh!!!!!!
8 to a 9.

Sounding better with age.
 jadewahoo wrote:

Too bad you weren't there... or here, in this moment where you could grasp the power and effectiveness of a single voice added to the chorus of the many voices who say "Enough!! No More!". Too bad that you have failed to recognize the value of a shared music to be a pathway that leads to the unification of a shared and common goal. However, that you haven't in no way denies the value and efficaciousness of music as a central and powerful force to unify people around a commonly shared view of a better world.
  
Just the opposite.  Rock, if it is any good at all, discourages people from acting in concert (sorry the pun).  The US lost the Vietnam war on the battlefield.  No amount of support at home would have won it.  There was a "silent majority" in favor of the war right up until the very end.  Rock can free the mind, yet drugs just lock it back up, so in a way it was a wash.  Too much narcissism, of which there is no shortage in your post.

Marley was undoubtedly a brilliant musician, but I think he's just a little bit overrated. 

That said, this tune is still an easy 7, even with such a tinny recording.
Could be the rallying song for the current Arab country protests. {#War}
My dog does not approve of this song, and insists that Mr. Marley sit down and hush. I disagree. :)

the prophet
It's interesting that the guitars and keys are very similar in sound to those used by Frank Zappa on the "Roxy and Elsewhere" album. did they have house gear?
Ever spelled be-ya-ja woah woah woah and then said it really fast in front of a mirrow?

Dangerous.

It's been overplayed, so one doesn't really listen to it that carefully anymore . . . but that is a mistake.  Just so powerful. Dignified defiance. 

An impassioned  cry that continually needs to be answered.   
10+  for calypsus liric post'ssssssssssssssssssssssss
Wow...started out at one (slower) tempo and the drummer worked-up the tempo to a moderately faster tempo.  I was a bit shocked...seemed like they were "rushing" the beat.  It can happen to the best of performers I guess... {#Drummer}

Get up, stand up: stand up for your rights!
Get up, stand up: stand up for your rights!
Get up, stand up: stand up for your rights!
Get up, stand up: dont give up the fight!

Preacherman, dont tell me,
Heaven is under the earth.
I know you dont know
What life is really worth.
Its not all that glitters is gold;
alf the story has never been told:
So now you see the light, eh!
Stand up for your rights. come on!

Get up, stand up: stand up for your rights!
Get up, stand up: dont give up the fight!
Get up, stand up: stand up for your rights!
Get up, stand up: dont give up the fight!

Most people think,
Great God will come from the skies,
Take away everything
And make everybody feel high.
But if you know what life is worth,
You will look for yours on earth:
And now you see the light,
You stand up for your rights. jah!

Get up, stand up! (jah, jah!)
Stand up for your rights! (oh-hoo!)
Get up, stand up! (get up, stand up!)
Dont give up the fight! (life is your right!)
Get up, stand up! (so we cant give up the fight!)
Stand up for your rights! (lord, lord!)
Get up, stand up! (keep on struggling on!)
Dont give up the fight! (yeah!)

We sick an tired of-a your ism-skism game -
Dyin n goin to heaven in-a jesus name, lord.
We know when we understand:
Almighty God is a living man.
You can fool some people sometimes,
But you cant fool all the people all the time.
So now we see the light (what you gonna do? ),
We gonna stand up for our rights! (yeah, yeah, yeah!)

So you better:
Get up, stand up! (in the morning! git it up!)
Stand up for your rights! (stand up for our rights!)
Get up, stand up!
Dont give up the fight! (dont give it up, dont give it up!)
Get up, stand up! (get up, stand up!)
Stand up for your rights! (get up, stand up!)
Get up, stand up! ( ... )
Dont give up the fight! (get up, stand up!)
Get up, stand up! ( ... )
Stand up for your rights!
Get up, stand up!
Dont give up the fight! /fadeout/

remembering Mr. Robert "Bob" Nesta Marley

** 10 **




 lwilkinson wrote:


Music only has meaning to the young who have yet to live enough life to understand that music changes nothing.  Marley's from Jamaica'mon where the 'rasta's have been singing protest songs for how long? with how much positive change?

THe only way to change and history and your reference to slavery is to look at slavery.  It took the abolitionist movement which originated and was pushed by churches along with a civil war over states rights vs. federalism and which came very close to ending the United States to end slavery.

Then, after the Democrats during reconstruction institutued Jim Crow laws, it took another 100 years or so of aggitating by the church and other religious organizations along with civil disobedience to end that.

Then the 60's came along and everyone held hands and sang a lot of "Kumbaiya" and all we got was .....zilch!  Singing didn't end Vietnam nor did protests.  That took a lot of dead service men combined with a sagging economy and a change in administration.

Only being educated and then being politically involved will change anything.  Sitting around and singing but doing nothing results in.......nothing.

As to voting, FDR said it best (I think it was him?)....... "All elections are local and people always vote their pocketbook."

 Music, and I can name specific songs as well as generational music, has an emotionally and spiritually evocative effect. Music has always been an inspiring and motivating factor in my life, from my youth to my Elderhood of 58 where I now reside. It is the unifying force that music has upon the individuals who listen to it, who coalesce their actions and behaviors around it, in which they come to recognize a common perspective of the world and in respect of such, organize themselves from being rugged individualist who stand on their own out in the cold into a socio-political action corp.

The music of the 60s was a powerful motivating and bonding force. People sitting around the campfire, or a candle in the darkened apartment of a Lower East Side tenement, listening to the music, knowing that one was not alone, that there were others, so many others, listening as well, seeing the world through the POV expressed as the common voice of our people, embrazened us enough to get out of our rooms, into the streets and to create a social environment where the continuation of the Vietnam War was no longer acceptable. By putting our bodies on the line, in frot of Nat'l Guard troops and water cannons, in the line of fire of Tactical Police Force batons and bullets – and refusing to let the actions of the Goons to quiet our voices, we most certainly did force the hand of the policy makers to end that war. We kept the attention upon the hypocrisy and greed, the horrors being perpetrated in the name of Americans everywhere.

it was music, the songs of the Civil Rights era, through which the peole gave voice to their mutual concerns. It was the music of Woody Guthrie and his ilk who garnered the ear of the workers to step up and insist (all the while singing, remember) on the recognition of collective bargaining and the betterment of the workplace conditions.

Too bad you weren't there... or here, in this moment where you could grasp the power and effectiveness of a single voice added to the chorus of the many voices who say "Enough!! No More!". Too bad that you have failed to recognize the value of a shared music to be a pathway that leads to the unification of a shared and common goal. However, that you haven't in no way denies the value and efficaciousness of music as a central and powerful force to unify people around a commonly shared view of a better world.


 lwilkinson wrote:


THe only way to change and history and your reference to slavery is to look at slavery.  It took the abolitionist movement which originated and was pushed by churches along with a civil war over states rights vs. federalism and which came very close to ending the United States to end slavery.
 
the abolitionist where the worst case of hypocrites seen yet, but that's another truth little understood.
But just consider, sold their slaves south, made it illegal to be a free black man and live in many northern States and
then prosecuted an unholy war down south. But, as Lincoln said, "let the South go, where would we get our revenues?"

It was totally about States Rights vs. Federalism and we see where that got us today!
Rampant Federalism, squashed individual freedoms, and well on the road to Fascism.

But that's just my 2 cents.

Liked the Bob Marley tune!

 garthwb wrote:
Needs Peter Tosh's voice, I have to say...
  Three cheers for Mr. McIntosh, the composer of this one


I wish they'd give up the fight already.  Long and booooring.  IMHO.
 xc_para_puravida wrote:

I agree, music has the power to shift the Zeitgeist which then shifts the popular consensus of what is plausible or acceptable. Remember there was a time when it was thought that for governments to abandon the slave trade would be economically disastrous. Now, no government could openly endorse such a policy. Any act of consciousness is a political act!
 

Music only has meaning to the young who have yet to live enough life to understand that music changes nothing.  Marley's from Jamaica'mon where the 'rasta's have been singing protest songs for how long? with how much positive change?

THe only way to change and history and your reference to slavery is to look at slavery.  It took the abolitionist movement which originated and was pushed by churches along with a civil war over states rights vs. federalism and which came very close to ending the United States to end slavery.

Then, after the Democrats during reconstruction institutued Jim Crow laws, it took another 100 years or so of aggitating by the church and other religious organizations along with civil disobedience to end that.

Then the 60's came along and everyone held hands and sang a lot of "Kumbaiya" and all we got was .....zilch!  Singing didn't end Vietnam nor did protests.  That took a lot of dead service men combined with a sagging economy and a change in administration.

Only being educated and then being politically involved will change anything.  Sitting around and singing but doing nothing results in.......nothing.

As to voting, FDR said it best (I think it was him?)....... "All elections are local and people always vote their pocketbook."

thewiseking wrote:
what's worse than annoyingly overplayed monotonous reggae? annoyingly overplayed monotonous reggae with a rushed tempo.

You're more annoying than rushed tempo reggae....during live performance it often happens...what's the big deal?{#Bananasplit}
bless me my king!!{#Dance}
thewiseking wrote:
what's worse than annoyingly overplayed monotonous reggae? annoyingly overplayed monotonous reggae with a rushed tempo.
What I perceive is: pulse....nerve....extasy....passion....groove....what else do you want? And it's not that I'm deep into reggae either.
what's worse than annoyingly overplayed monotonous reggae? annoyingly overplayed monotonous reggae with a rushed tempo.
Rebel Music!
Needs Peter Tosh's voice, I have to say...
:tongue:
DeemerDave wrote:
Sounds like the speed keeps changing and the band is really tired, or really high. Oh yeah, Marley. Of course they're high. Never mind.
Seems fine to me partner.
Sounds like the speed keeps changing and the band is really tired, or really high. Oh yeah, Marley. Of course they're high. Never mind.
I just can't bring myself to "dog" Marley. Won't do it.
A musical genius. It doesn't take Kaya (or whatever you like to call it) to appreciate that fact. - Riff
I am compelled to say yes.
Excellent--and right after i finish smoking a "spliff." Bill, your timing is impeccable. I think this song gets a higher rating because of my "elevated" mood.
bupanishad2012 wrote:
Enuff with Bob Marley, Pleeze! I know Peter Tosh used to sing Reggae, too!
More Bob Marley PLEASE! The man was a prophet. And (though this rendition is not one of my favorites) he had a super groovy groove to back his preachings.
FluorideFreeMN wrote:
I like Bob Marley, but I hear too much of him on air at RP. 5 and sinking fast...
More, more, more. Want more here. 7.5.
starfishNcoffee wrote:
It's because people like you think this way that things keep going in the wrong direction. You obviously care but are too damn intellectually lazy to do anything. Wake up! :beat:
I agree, music has the power to shift the Zeitgeist which then shifts the popular consensus of what is plausible or acceptable. Remember there was a time when it was thought that for governments to abandon the slave trade would be economically disastrous. Now, no government could openly endorse such a policy. Any act of consciousness is a political act!
Now Marley is a guy that I wish I could have seen in concert. Darn it darn it darn it.
This album and "Bridges to Babylon" always sound to me like somebody is rushing. I think it is the drummer. Makes it hard to listen to for me. Like there is a push-pull thing going on all the time on stage.
i love everything on this album. 15 years old down by the river with my mates ghetto blaster... good times. correction, I tell a lie. It was this one:
Gryn wrote:
I give this song a "decent," but only because it really tries hard to make a difference. Everybody knows songs never make a damn bit of difference, anyway. It's about the military might, it's about politics.. And the majority of good people don't even care about politics.
It's because people like you think this way that things keep going in the wrong direction. You obviously care but are too damn intellectually lazy to do anything. Wake up! :beat:
Enuff with Bob Marley, Pleeze! I know Peter Tosh used to sing Reggae, too!
Gryn wrote:
I give this song a "decent," but only because it really tries hard to make a difference. Everybody knows songs never make a damn bit of difference, anyway. It's about the military might, it's about politics.. And the majority of good people don't even care about politics.
He did make a difference with his life, he educated people like me.
I like Bob Marley, but I hear too much of him on air at RP. 5 and sinking fast...
This is the first time hearing Bob on RP, how nice. I went through a big reggae period in college. This brings back some great memories. I saw him live in Boston right before he died, he really did a lot of jamming and it was a great show!!!!!
:puke: :puke: :puke: horrible version of a boring song! :puke: :puke: :puke:
I give this song a "decent," but only because it really tries hard to make a difference. Everybody knows songs never make a damn bit of difference, anyway. It's about the military might, it's about politics.. And the majority of good people don't even care about politics.
Ag3nt0rang3 wrote:
Oh, come on, in this case it was ironic. the equivalent of Nigel Tufnel saying "you see this string? we play this one a lot."
For those needing a smile........try this:- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nigel_Tufnel
Even by the abysmally low standards of reggae, this is ridiculously boring.
Pyro wrote:
Reggae, from a musicians standpoint (or at least THIS musician) is BORING. ONE chord, repetitious lyrics...I just don't get reggae. And yes, I've smoked my share of ganja.
That may be true, but for me Reggae is SO much more than musicianship. It makes me feel good, and after all, isn't that one of the prime goals of music? The ability to make you feel or to transform your mood?
meloman wrote:
Don't you just love it when one of these songs comes on listeners start using words like "mon" instead of "man" to show how cool they are?
Oh, come on, in this case it was ironic. the equivalent of Nigel Tufnel saying "you see this string? we play this one a lot."
:music:
bokey wrote:
It's a really good chord mon.
Don't you just love it when one of these songs comes on listeners start using words like "mon" instead of "man" to show how cool they are?
Pyro wrote:
Reggae, from a musicians standpoint (or at least THIS musician) is BORING. ONE chord, repetitious lyrics. . . I just don't get reggae. And yes, I've smoked my share of ganja.
It's a really good chord mon.
Pyro wrote:
Reggae, from a musicians standpoint (or at least THIS musician) is BORING. ONE chord, repetitious lyrics...I just don't get reggae. And yes, I've smoked my share of ganja.
Bless you, Pyro, for speaking the truth.
Which album is this version on?
I've gotten more reggae here than I have heard in my entire life. I'm still not a fan, and I guess I never will be. I'm totally okay with that. :frustrated:
Pyro wrote:
Reggae, from a musicians standpoint (or at least THIS musician) is BORING. ONE chord, repetitious lyrics...I just don't get reggae. And yes, I've smoked my share of ganja.
Bring on the experts.......... :foot-in-mouth:
Darn that cool set ended. I feel bad for not being a Marley fan. My fiancee loves them because they remind her of summer, but to me it just sounds monotonous.
I guess you had to be there. I must say however, that having recently begun to edumacate myself on the whole rasta thing, I find it fascinating.
For a split second there this reminded me of "Echidna's Arf" from Zappa's "Roxy and Elsewhere". I must be hallucinating.
Not doin' it for me either.
:yawn:
9. Groovy live version of this one. Not my fave Marley, would've only been an 8 for the studio version, but this sounds like onea those, if you were there, you'd just be rockin' to. One of a few folks I'm very disappointed never to have seen live.
Mugro wrote:
This is one of those albums that is absolutely a MUST HAVE. Top ten "Desert Island" album for me. No question.
I'd sooner drown.
This is one of those albums that is absolutely a MUST HAVE. Top ten "Desert Island" album for me. No question.
Nice Les Paul.
Its Marley, for Pete's sake- listen to the lyrics, and FEEL the groove.
Music shouldn't have to lean so much on the lyrics to be good - that's why it's music, not simply poetry. A lot of lyrics are strong poetry in their own right, but since these are songs we're listening to, it's totally fair to judge them on their musical merits. redtex wrote:
Listen to the lyrics...no, not the chorus, the verse...and maybe you will 'see the light'. And maybe you will be blessed with his 'Redemption Song'.
redtex wrote:
Listen to the lyrics...no, not the chorus, the verse...and maybe you will 'see the light'.
So, ahem, don't give up the fight.
Pyro wrote:
Reggae, from a musicians standpoint (or at least THIS musician) is BORING. ONE chord, repetitious lyrics...I just don't get reggae. And yes, I've smoked my share of ganja.
Listen to the lyrics...no, not the chorus, the verse...and maybe you will 'see the light'. And maybe you will be blessed with his 'Redemption Song'.
Pyro wrote:
Reggae, from a musicians standpoint (or at least THIS musician) is BORING. ONE chord, repetitious lyrics...I just don't get reggae. And yes, I've smoked my share of ganja.
Very well put,I could not agree with you more..
LennytheB wrote:
my thoughts exactly. Sounds like they were just going through the motions on this one.
And somebody's not quite holdin' dat riddim steady either.
Bill, for the love of Jah, please play the STUDIO VERSION!!! Thank you.
Gotta say I'm getting a bit 'done' with Marley. Maybe it's the (lack of) energy on this track...
Pyro wrote:
Reggae, from a musicians standpoint (or at least THIS musician) is BORING. ONE chord, repetitious lyrics...I just don't get reggae. And yes, I've smoked my share of ganja.
One chord... repetitious lyrics... I guess you don't like James Brown either? The appeal of reggae for me (as a musician of the non-reggae variety) is the fantastic *groove* and soulful sound of tracks like this. Dig
Is "the fight" referred to someone bogarting the roach?
Guess you had to be there? This really illustrates why many live recordings just don't impress me.
Reggae, from a musicians standpoint (or at least THIS musician) is BORING. ONE chord, repetitious lyrics...I just don't get reggae. And yes, I've smoked my share of ganja.
jah_blessed wrote:
Lowered my rating to a 4. This really is inferior to the studio version and the sound is terrible to boot. One of my favourite Wailers tunes, ruined by a so-so performance.
my thoughts exactly. Sounds like they were just going through the motions on this one.
Lowered my rating to a 4. This really is inferior to the studio version and the sound is terrible to boot. One of my favourite Wailers tunes, ruined by a so-so performance.
:sunny: :sunny: Just love the reggae, especially Bob!">
Ugh...I'm gonna get up, stand up, and leave my head phones at the desk while I escape this song...
jah_blessed wrote:
Well, needless to say Marley was more succesful than Tosh. Anyway, I was just pointing out that this particular song is also his, since they wrote it together. IMO, Tosh has the best line on the original studio version: "You can fool some people sometimes, but you can't fool all the people all the time."
Yeah, the moment when Tosh takes over lead vocals in the studio version is classic. Probably his finest hour, based on what I've heard on The Essential Peter Tosh. I do like some of his solo stuff like Downpressor Man and the live version of Whatcha Gonna Do, but the people who whine about reggae being too repetitive would have a field day with African or Ketchy Shuby. Still, it's hard to say how much he had to do with the musical development of the Wailers, so all due respect to Tosh, Bunny Wailer, and all the rest.
JohnErle wrote:
I've heard that before from Tosh's supporters, but Tosh's version of the song is deadly boring, IMHO. I'm sure he had an important part to play in the development of this and other early Marley classics, but my impression is that Tosh benefitted more from his association with Marley than Marley gained fom Tosh.
Well, needless to say Marley was more succesful than Tosh. Anyway, I was just pointing out that this particular song is also his, since they wrote it together. IMO, Tosh has the best line on the original studio version: "You can fool some people sometimes, but you can't fool all the people all the time."
jah_blessed wrote:
Really, it's also Peter Tosh's song.
I've heard that before from Tosh's supporters, but Tosh's version of the song is deadly boring, IMHO. I'm sure he had an important part to play in the development of this and other early Marley classics, but my impression is that Tosh benefitted more from his association with Marley than Marley gained fom Tosh.
The version we heard played today is not from "Live at The Roxy" , but rather from "Live", a 1975 single-disc album recorded in London. I must have heard this a dozen times at parties in the late seventies. Go to allmusic.com and find Bob's page and then click discography and then click the compilations tab. Finally, click the third choice Live---1975 (Tuff Gong label) for the original album info.
When is it over, What is he saying? Santa's full of lies? I just don't get this Bob Marley thing...
Nice Pace :sunny:
:devil_pimp:
JohnErle wrote:
This is my first time hearing this live version, and I have to say that it doesn't compare to the album version, which is as close to perfection as any musican could ever hope to achieve. EDIT: I'm flabbergasted to discover that the album version has NEVER been played on RP! Can that be right?!?!
Yeah, I agree, the studio version blows this out of the water. I'm also surprised it's never been played. Really, it's also Peter Tosh's song. The Burnin' deluxe edition is really good, BTW. (Just bought it and have been playing it for several hours.)
This is my first time hearing this live version, and I have to say that it doesn't compare to the album version, which is as close to perfection as any musican could ever hope to achieve. EDIT: I'm flabbergasted to discover that the album version has NEVER been played on RP! Can that be right?!?!
jlind wrote:
And the volume goes down till this crap is over
I'm sorry? What did you say? I had the radio up too loud while I was listening to one of my favorite Bob Marley (actually Peter Tosh) songs. You'll have to speak slowly and clearly so that we'll understand you, if we ever will.
And the volume goes down till this crap is over
Roverfish wrote:
Some of my absolute favorite lyrics in any song anywhere: "We sick an' tired of-a your ism-skism game - Dyin' 'n' goin' to heaven in-a jesus' name, lord. We know when we understand: Almighty God is a living man. You can fool some people sometimes, But you can't fool all the people all the time." Timeless and classic. Thanks, RP. :clap:
One of the best reggae tunes on RP. Excellent.
first day on radio paradise and i love it so far! especially now that i know bob is played :-)
cherylg4 wrote:
If I never hear this song again, it will be too soon....
If RP plays this song again right after it ends, it won't be too soon...
If I never hear this song again, it will be too soon....
:clap: :nodhead: :sunny.gif:
:sunny.gif: Happy B'day!
:music: :sunny.gif:
Zweiblumen wrote:
Reggae is about the only thing on RP that I have to mute.
sorry to hear that.
Reggae is about the only thing on RP that I have to mute.
The man really had a gift for writing hooks...
Excellent song, but I think I like the studio version better.
:music: :jump: :music: :jump: :music:
Stoned slackers anthem! ;) "You can fool some people sometimes, But you can't fool all the people all the time."... Barnum too.
Possibly my fav Marley track. Always have to sing along.
I love Bob, he's in my top 10 for sure of all time. I needed a lil' riotous irie jammin' at this moment to pick my droolin' head up off the keyboard and push on thru... \:D/
reggae = :music: oldslabsides wrote:
reggae = :puke:
Typesbad wrote:
I like this song a lot more than I like listening to it. Does that make sense to anyone but me?
I totally get that. :nodhead: