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The Byrds — Turn! Turn! Turn!
Album: Turn! Turn! Turn!
Avg rating:
8

Your rating:
Total ratings: 1563









Released: 1967
Length: 3:45
Plays (last 30 days): 2
To everything (Turn! Turn! Turn!)
There is a season (Turn! Turn! Turn!)
And a time to every purpose under heaven

A time to be born, a time to die
A time to plant, a time to reap
A time to kill, a time to heal
A time to laugh, a time to weep

To everything (Turn! Turn! Turn!)
There is a season (Turn! Turn! Turn!)
And a time to every purpose under heaven

A time to build up, a time to break down
A time to dance, a time to mourn
A time to cast away stones
A time to gather stones together

To everything (Turn! Turn! Turn!)
There is a season (Turn! Turn! Turn!)
And a time to every purpose under heaven

A time of love, a time of hate
A time of war, a time of peace
A time you may embrace
A time to refrain from embracing

To everything (Turn! Turn! Turn!)
There is a season (Turn! Turn! Turn!)
And a time to every purpose under heaven

A time to gain, a time to lose
A time to rend, a time to sew
A time for love, a time for hate
A time for peace, I swear it's not too late
Comments (111)add comment
 Proclivities wrote:

I've wondered why Pete Seeger put any exclamation points in the title at all, not just one at the end.  It's a pretty mellow folk song with the majority of the lyrics coming from the Old Testament and it's not as if one is supposed to scream the chorus.  Maybe the idea for the song title came to him while he was a passenger in a car with a badly distracted driver: "Turn! Turn! Turn! You idiot!"

Perhaps those '60s times--Vietnam, The Cold War, the Bomb, assassinations, racial and civil strife, and all the rest--virtually added the !!! without the writer's or performers' consent.
Perhaps this classic song should be updated and re-released under a revised title.   Or not, as nothing but the players and places have changed. 
Written by Pete Seeger, of course.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...
 buddy wrote:
didn't really like the first one.... I was pretty disappointed 
 
 

For historical reasons, if no other, a 9.
A perfect song. 
 rpdevotee wrote:

Absolutely ironic considering the lyrics were taken verbatim from the bible!: Ecclesiastes (3:1-8)
 
Ecclesiastes 3 King James Version (KJV)

3 To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven:

2 A time to be born, and a time to die; a time to plant, and a time to pluck up that which is planted;

3 A time to kill, and a time to heal; a time to break down, and a time to build up;

4 A time to weep, and a time to laugh; a time to mourn, and a time to dance;

5 A time to cast away stones, and a time to gather stones together; a time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing;

6 A time to get, and a time to lose; a time to keep, and a time to cast away;

7 A time to rend, and a time to sew; a time to keep silence, and a time to speak;

8 A time to love, and a time to hate; a time of war, and a time of peace.

album cover reminds me of my mother's Puding basin haircuts until  I was 6 and found the barber's.
music 8
The Big Show's theme song 
 Proclivities wrote:

I've wondered why Pete Seeger put any exclamation points in the title at all, not just one at the end.  It's a pretty mellow folk song with the majority of the lyrics coming from the Old Testament and it's not as if one is supposed to scream the chorus.  Maybe the idea for the song title came to him while he was a passenger in a car with a badly distracted driver: "Turn! Turn! Turn! You idiot!"
 

"Come around, idiot! Come around!"
 buddy wrote:


There is a new Laurel Canyon documentary coming out that looks to be way better. Look for it! 
 

Sweet. I also recently saw the same doc thewiseking mentioned and had the same impression. Worth watching for the interviews and old footage but Jakob and friends are  kind of a drag on it.... the scenes where they try and have conversations amongst themselves are so badly written I felt embarrassed on their behalves.

Also, wait for the credits. Someone who is conspicuously absent from the doc shows up.
 thewiseking wrote:
Saw the Laurel Canyon doc on Amazon. Not bad. Puts the importance of these guys in perspective. Unfortunately the show was hijacked by Jakob Dylan and a few of his contemporaries. 
 

There is a new Laurel Canyon documentary coming out that looks to be way better. Look for it! 
This classic is anything but dated in the times we live in right now.  A masterpiece.
Pretty good tho dated!
Great music, lovable melody, wonderful  fascinating background guitars,
lyrics  related to the bible, what a masterpiece.
 thewiseking wrote:
 Saw the Laurel Canyon doc on Amazon. Not bad. Puts the importance of these guys in perspective. Unfortunately the show was hijacked by Jakob Dylan and a few of his contemporaries. 
 
Haven't seen it yet, but I'm going to. 

What EXACTLY did J. Dylan do to "hijack" this documentary?
Saw the Laurel Canyon doc on Amazon. Not bad. Puts the importance of these guys in perspective. Unfortunately the show was hijacked by Jakob Dylan and a few of his contemporaries. 
 passsion8 wrote:
I had to put down my 16-year-old collie shepherd the other day and explain it to my 15-year-old son that nothing lasts forever. I then put this song on for him to understand the laws of impermanence and how every season comes to an end. I think he got it. 
 

 UdoSievers wrote:
Dear RP folks, please install a feature to disable 'Comments' since most of them are just b..s..t!
 
You don't have to read the comments......though sometimes they can be fun, informative, inspirational, and yes, bullshit sometimes too.  LLRP!!
Dear RP folks, please install a feature to disable 'Comments' since most of them are just b..s..t!
 The lyrics: words from Ecclesiastes, more than 2,000 years old wisdom

 jp33442 wrote:
Another song that got played to death going to hit the next button
 
A time to listen to this song, a time to hit next and avoid the message....I'll stick with my 9 on this and enjoy it (this time, maybe next time I'll skip too) LLRP!!
The original song that made white people turnt.
Another song that got played to death going to hit the next button
 Proclivities wrote:

I've wondered why Pete Seeger put any exclamation points in the title at all, not just one at the end.  It's a pretty mellow folk song with the majority of the lyrics coming from the Old Testament and it's not as if one is supposed to scream the chorus.  Maybe the idea for the song title came to him while he was a passenger in a car with a badly distracted driver: "Turn! Turn! Turn! You idiot!"
 
I wonder if it was the graphic designer for the Byrds album. w/a quick search all that turns up with Pete is no punctuation or commas. 
 Laptopdog wrote:
Whenever I see the title of this song, I think of the episode of Seinfeld where Elaine has a problem with people using unnecessary exclamation points. 
Why isn't this song just called Turn, Turn, Turn?!
No, it's got to be Turn! Turn! Turn!
 
I've wondered why Pete Seeger put any exclamation points in the title at all, not just one at the end.  It's a pretty mellow folk song with the majority of the lyrics coming from the Old Testament and it's not as if one is supposed to scream the chorus.  Maybe the idea for the song title came to him while he was a passenger in a car with a badly distracted driver: "Turn! Turn! Turn! You idiot!"
 TerrorGovernor wrote:
The Byrds are wonderful

Peace to my brothers and sisters
 

The Byrds are wonderful

Peace to my brothers and sisters
Whenever I see the title of this song, I think of the episode of Seinfeld where Elaine has a problem with people using unnecessary exclamation points. 
Why isn't this song just called Turn, Turn, Turn?!
No, it's got to be Turn! Turn! Turn!
 stargazer1 wrote:
I remember seeing this record on some burn pile of "sinful" rock music. My irony meter broke. 
 
Absolutely ironic considering the lyrics were taken verbatim from the bible!: Ecclesiastes (3:1-8)
My Border Collie just Dx with cancer...
 andy.ormsby955 wrote:
Blatant plagiarism - I could swear they stole these lyrics from somewhere.
   

I remember seeing this record on some burn pile of "sinful" rock music. My irony meter broke. 
"... a time to refrain from embracing..."
I discovered just last night the connection of the lyrics of this song and the Bible. Blew me away. Ecclesiastical chapter 3.
Blatant plagiarism - I could swear they stole these lyrics from somewhere.
Beautiful interpretation of Ecclesiastes.  Thanks for all of the amazing comments from the RP community.  
 passsion8 wrote:
I had to put down my 16-year-old collie shepherd the other day and explain it to my 15-year-old son that nothing lasts forever. I then put this song on for him to understand the laws of impermanence and how every season comes to an end. I think he got it. 

 
Yup.  Never easy to put down a loved one.  Nor should it be.  
Umm, Nope.
I had to put down my 16-year-old collie shepherd the other day and explain it to my 15-year-old son that nothing lasts forever. I then put this song on for him to understand the laws of impermanence and how every season comes to an end. I think he got it. 
{#Dancingbanana_2}
A TIME FOR CHANGE
{#Daisy}
 rdo wrote:
Ah, the wisdom of King Solomon.  The man with 700 wives. 
 
Yep. And that was his downfall.

There's a lot of gems in Ecclesiastes...

Chapter 1:4-8 
What advantage does man have in all his work
which he does under the sun?
 A generation goes and a generation comes,
But the earth remains forever.
5 Also, the sun rises and the sun sets;
And hastening to its place it rises there again.
6 Blowing toward the south,
Then turning toward the north,
The wind continues swirling along;
And on its circular courses the wind returns.
7 All the rivers flow into the sea,
Yet the sea is not full.
To the place where the rivers flow,
There they flow again.
8 All things are wearisome;
Man is not able to tell it.
The eye is not satisfied with seeing,
Nor is the ear filled with hearing.

Right after "Turn, Turn, Turn"...

Chapter 3: 9-11

What profit is there to the worker from that in which he toils?
10 I have seen the task which God has given the sons of men with which to occupy themselves
11 He has made everything appropriate in its time. He has also set eternity in their heart, yet so that man will not find out the work which God has done from the beginning even to the end.

Chapter 8: 16-17
When I gave my heart to know wisdom and to see the task which has been done on the earth (even though one should never sleep day or night),
17 and I saw every work of God, I concluded that man cannot discover the work which has been done under the sun. Even though man should seek laboriously, he will not discover; and though the wise man should say, “I know,” he cannot discover.
Chapter 12: 13-14
The conclusion, when all has been heard, is: fear God and keep His commandments, because this applies to every person. 1
4 For God will bring every act to judgment, everything which is hidden, whether it is good or evil.
 






 Emwolb wrote:
It's based in the bible ... how could it not be God-like!!?!!
 
Ecclesiastes is a book everyone should read.
The wonder of how some songs just make us pause and smile...
 Stingray wrote:
The early BYRDS caught the worm - most definitely!

Another great song of the band!

 
Wow, Stink Ray getting all clever on us. Who knew he had it in him. A regular Mark Twain! An Oscar Wilde. 
Jingle-Jangle heaven!
 PopKombo wrote:
Love the jingly jangly 12 string

 
that would be the exquisite sounds of a Rickenbacker !  {#Music}
 Stingray wrote:
The early BYRDS caught the worm - most definitely!

Another great song of the band!

 
Yes indeedy.
The early BYRDS caught the worm - most definitely!

Another great song of the band!
 kcar wrote:

Never mind that most of this song is lifted verbatim from Ecclesiastes 3:1-8 and that Pete Seeger wrote the rest... {#Music} 

 
I thought everyone knew that...I guess not.
 gjeeg wrote:
The Byrds all went to see Hard Day's Night, came out dizzy with joy, swinging around on lamp posts, went out and bought their guitars, a twelve string, and wanted to be the Beatles. That's the story I heard.

 
Never mind that most of this song is lifted verbatim from Ecclesiastes 3:1-8 and that Pete Seeger wrote the rest... {#Music} 
And then Bill plays The Byrds... the progressions are exquisite, the selections impeccable, the vibe delectable, and the music sublime.
The Byrds all went to see Hard Day's Night, came out dizzy with joy, swinging around on lamp posts, went out and bought their guitars, a twelve string, and wanted to be the Beatles. That's the story I heard.
{#Music} .... love this tune it's so good for the ears - 9
This song qualifies as the movement anthem of the period.
Love the jingly jangly 12 string
In glorious monaural!
It's based in the bible ... how could it not be God-like!!?!!
Wow, surprised I had not rated this yet.  9
wow, that is really amazing once you stop and listen to it for what it is. so overused but for good reason.
classic tune, but getting a bit moldy, imho. 7

This cover is still soooo good for the ears...

and it is not casual that this song follows the Willie Nile song...  cool sound...
 
Ah, the wisdom of King Solomon.  The man with 700 wives. 

Ten! Ten! Ten!
Hehe, I love it when RP does thematic song combinations. This following Simple Gifts was an excellent transition.
as anybody who knows me well can attest, it isn't often that i go around quoting passages from the bible but i had to know how closely this song follows ecclesiastes and whaddya know, there it is. i never knew this! 

 To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven:
 a time to be born, and a time to die; a time to plant, and a time to pluck up that which isplanted;
 a time to kill, and a time to heal; a time to break down, and a time to build up;
 a time to weep, and a time to laugh; a time to mourn, and a time to dance;
 a time to cast away stones, and a time to gather stones together; a time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing;
 a time to get, and a time to lose; a time to keep, and a time to cast away;
 a time to rend, and a time to sew; a time to keep silence, and a time to speak;
 a time to love, and a time to hate; a time of war, and a time of peace.
 What profit hath he that worketh in that wherein he laboreth?
 ¶ I have seen the travail, which God hath given to the sons of men to be exercised in it.
 He hath made every thing beautiful in his time: also he hath set the world in their heart, so that no man can find out the work that God maketh from the beginning to the end.
 I know that there is no good in them, but for a man to rejoice, and to do good in his life.
 And also that every man should eat and drink, and enjoy the good of all his labor, it is the gift of God.
 I know that, whatsoever God doeth, it shall be for ever: nothing can be put to it, nor any thing taken from it: and God doeth it, that men should fear before him.
 That which hath been is now; and that which is to be hath already been; and God requireth that which is past.
 

 TerryS wrote:
Oh Bill!
 That was sneaky,  a tune attibutable to William Byrd followed by (what else?) The Byrds.
Liking the mix. 
 
Ha! Someone else spotted it! I have to say, I love the sometimes oblique way Bill weaves his magic here.
 RParadise wrote:

I've listened to this song for over 30 years now, including seeing Pete Seeger perform it live several times (I live near him) and I have never thought of it as a religious song. Rather, I have always thought of it as a song about the Earth, a rememberance of how things move in cycles. That there is renewal and rebirth after death is not necessarily a religious notion. One only need go for walks in the woods throughout the seasons of the year to see the truth of this.
 
I so agree, have never thought of this song as religious, not in any way
If there's one song (from a social and political perspective) that can, and probably always will, bring tears to my eyes, it's this one.
Oh Bill!
 That was sneaky,  a tune attibutable to William Byrd followed by (what else?) The Byrds.
Liking the mix. 
Lovely segue from Simple Gifts. Thanks Bill.

Judy Collins - "Turn Turn Turn" Live (1960's):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DejUPN4SksU

"Judy Collins and Pete Seeger singing Pete's song "Turn Turn Turn" From early 1960's Pete Seeger show."


The Byrds - "Turn Turn Turn" Live:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aNopQq5lWqQ

Hello Christine: Joyfulchristine wrote:
Yep, you're right. This is almost a verbatim quote from the book of Ecclesiastes in the Bible (except for the "I swear it's not too late" bit). Excellent lyrics!
...and who wrote those lyrics? . . . . . . Pete Seeger! :sunny: He also wrote this one. Neil
great_one wrote:
Timeless classic! :clap:
Agreed.... :notworthy:
Worth dying for...
I needed to hear this today - awful day at work. Thank you, Bill.
Originally Posted by warwalker: Oh man, the song (and, although I'm no biblical scholar, I am therefore guessing that the Old Testament) even says "a time to every purpose under heaven".
Yep, you're right. This is almost a verbatim quote from the book of Ecclesiastes in the Bible (except for the "I swear it's not too late" bit). Excellent lyrics!
they need to gather the remaining members, go back and re-record this one. sounds like it is being played off an 8-track... a very bad 8-track.
I think Toni Smith (the college basketball player who is turning her back on the American flag during the Pledge of Allegiance) should listen to this song and re-think her actions - it\'s a time to not turn our backs on each other...
How could anyone deny a classic such as this? I Love it, makes me wish I was born WAY earlier...haha
I cannot stand this songÂ…one of the few on radio paradise that makes me cringe!
the credits I remember said: Seeger/Ecclesiates the old testament ROCKS :cool:
Originally Posted by ElCapitan: This is a Pete Seeger song - also a true genious - adapted from a Bible verse. Speaking of that...how about some Pete Seeger on RP?
This is another one of those songs (like Get Together, by the Youngbloods) that makes me wish I had been born a bit earlier... love these tunes, they make me feel good!!!!
Originally Posted by lily34: its beautiful in its own way. the sentiment, whether you think of it in a spiritual way or not... so it may be a little dated. if you think about it as a true piece of history that stands up to remind you of times past...well, that kind of works. i'm obviously not making my point well so i'll stop now. :oops:
:) ...so, do you like it or not? ;) I find the lyrics philosophical rather than religious: the concepts embodied here are universal and not representative of any particular religious belief.
Originally Posted by RParadise: I've listened to this song for over 30 years now, including seeing Pete Seeger perform it live several times (I live near him) and I have never thought of it as a religious song. Rather, I have always thought of it as a song about the Earth, a rememberance of how things move in cycles. That there is renewal and rebirth after death is not necessarily a religious notion. One only need go for walks in the woods throughout the seasons of the year to see the truth of this.
its beautiful in its own way. the sentiment, whether you think of it in a spiritual way or not... so it may be a little dated. if you think about it as a true piece of history that stands up to remind you of times past...well, that kind of works. i'm obviously not making my point well so i'll stop now. :oops:
Originally Posted by evening: I was born in '73 and I think this song isn't too bad. I'd probably like it more if it wasn't all religious.
I've listened to this song for over 30 years now, including seeing Pete Seeger perform it live several times (I live near him) and I have never thought of it as a religious song. Rather, I have always thought of it as a song about the Earth, a rememberance of how things move in cycles. That there is renewal and rebirth after death is not necessarily a religious notion. One only need go for walks in the woods throughout the seasons of the year to see the truth of this.
It\'s hard for me to understand why something \"all religious,\" can\'t be enjoyed and have meaning in today\'s context at the same time. Are people really that shallow? And indeed, U2 often depicts religious situations in the lyrics of their songs. As for being trite, I\'d have to say that most rock/alternat/metal/you-name-it is a lot more trite than this.
Originally Posted by allg63: an outstanding version of a great song wrote by bob dylan a true genious and sang by a great band :)
This is a Pete Seeger song - also a true genious - adapted from a Bible verse. Speaking of that...how about some Pete Seeger on RP?
Originally Posted by kevination: Maybe it's because I was born in '73 instead of '63 but I find this song trite.
Yup, that's it. :)
i would be hard to slam the wisdom that God gave solomon in ecclesiastes. or the beauty of this music.
Born in \'53, brings back oh so good memories of fresh, vibrant music that emerged weekly from the FM radio rather than the nauseating procession of dreck that passes for popular music today.
Originally Posted by Typesbad: I don't think I could have let that go by wiithout comment either :lol:
Wow. I suppose the work of the detractor must be Godlike in its eminence. Boy am I glad I am such a simpleton that this actually appeals to me; a blessing in disguise I surmise. Oh well, different strokes for different folks ...
I don't think I could have let that go by wiithout comment either
Originally Posted by RParadise: From: Lasse Date: Jul 3,2001 don't know about the byrds, but this song is awful... terrible lyrics and terrible music! Oh, yeah, terrible lyrics. From Eclesiastes. Only been around for 3,000 years.
:lol:
Oh to be young and idealistic again. What has happened to modern society? Some off todays most popular artists sing of raping their girlfriends and murdering their mothers and justify this by saying its just a song. In 1942 it was just ethnic cleansing??
From: Lasse Date: Jul 3,2001 don't know about the byrds, but this song is awful... terrible lyrics and terrible music! Oh, yeah, terrible lyrics. From Eclesiastes. Only been around for 3,000 years.
Great sound. A month or so ago Roger McGuinn split a bill (separate performances on the same night) at a local club with Al Stewart. Two artists crossing paths so to speak. Roger still sounds great. His mother was in attendance since she lives in the state. If you get a chance to see Roger (or Al for that matter) don\'t miss it. They both still give you the impression they still love what they do and it manifest\'s itself in their performance
Brings me back to my childhood. Thanks for the good vibes.