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Al Stewart — On the Border (live)
Album: Rhymes in Rooms
Avg rating:
7.7

Your rating:
Total ratings: 2839









Released: 1992
Length: 5:02
Plays (last 30 days): 1
The fishing boats go out across the evening water
Smuggling guns and arms across the Spanish border
The wind whips up the waves so loud
The ghost moon sails among the clouds
Turns the rifles into silver on the border

On my wall the colours of the maps are running
From Africa the winds they talk of changes coming
The torches flare up in the night
The hand that sets the farms alight
Has spread the word to those who're waiting on the border

In the village where I grew up
Nothing seems the same
Still you never see the change from day to day
And no-one notices the customs slip away

Late last night the rain was knocking at my window
I moved across the darkened room and in the lampglow
I thought I saw down in the street
The spirit of the century
Telling us that we're all standing on the border

In the islands where I grew up
Nothing seems the same
It's just the patterns that remain
An empty shell
But there's a strangeness in the air you feel too well

The fishing boats go out across the evening water
Smuggling guns and arms across the Spanish border
The wind whips up the waves so loud
The ghost moon sails among the clouds
Turns the rifles into silver on the border

On the border
On the border
On the border
Comments (204)add comment
EXCELLENT!!   Thanx RP!   
 Jayesea wrote:

He foretells Chance the Rapper at the end of the first verse.  I'm impressed.




great performer - posted by a fellow GHreenockian
He foretells Chance the Rapper at the end of the first verse.  I'm impressed.

so good.
Great song. Excellent work by guitarist Peter White, too
Al Stewart has always been an artist I love to listen to in the winter and I put away in the summer.  I can't explain why exactly.  But this is nice to hear
 xavfitz wrote:
my favorite is Roads to Moscow but this rocks as well
 
Agreed.  For a well written elaboration of Soviet military methods in East Prussia in WWII, and a fuller explanation of their reasoning , read Armageddon by Max Hastings. 
Peter White featured on guitar - this is amazingly good...
 cosmicjoe54 wrote:



there is mention of Russia though?



Wrong Al Stewart song.  "Roads to Moscow" is one of his other fab epic songs.
 fredriley wrote:

I strongly suspect that you're right. The Republican side in the Spanish Revolution/Civil War (take your pick according to political viewpoint) was desperately short of arms to fight Franco's forces as the Western capitalist countries enforced a strict arms embargo. This had zero effect on the Francoists as they had all the army stockpiles and were being supplied by fascist Italy and Nazi Germany, and had plenty of money to buy more on the black market. Effectively the Western powers sided, implicitly, with the Francoist rebels, by denying the Republicans, who were the legitimately constituted and elected government, the means to defend themselves. France also closed its border with Spain so that anti-fascists could not legimately join the Republicans so the thousands of volunteers for the struggle had to smuggle themselves across the border. 

Even at the time this was morally and politically shameful, and it soon came back to bite the Western powers when Nazi Germany attacked them. The simple lesson from history is: oppose fascism wherever it rears its ugly head.

I was really taken with this song even as a kid when I knew zip about the Spanish Revolution, and it's got a special significance for me now that I'm a bit more aware.  With the other Al Stewart songs played by RP I've really come to respect the guy immensely. 9 from the Nottingham jury, though in truth songs as profound and moving as this are insulted by ratings. 




there is mention of Russia though?
We may have learned our lesson. To judge by the new NATO response to Putin's invasion  of Ukraine.  If only the rearming had started earlier.
Gypsy Kings on the Scottish border. Magnifico! 
GOD LIKE
this should have been amazing live - I enjoyed it but it felt rushed. one studio version i prefer 
 Queue wrote:


I'm going to miss having my studio monitors when I have to start going back to the office.   I do have a few spares that I could bring in, but I'm not sure my office neighbors will appreciate listening to RP as much as I do.

Take the speakers! Convert them into supporting listeners!
 bigbobbybubba wrote:

It doesn't get any better than this version on FLAC codec running through a DAC on studio monitors. With a glass or two of your favorite 12 year old libation, you realize life is good with Bill, Rebecca and RP.

My monthly donation has been the best lifetime entertainment value.



I'm going to miss having my studio monitors when I have to start going back to the office.   I do have a few spares that I could bring in, but I'm not sure my office neighbors will appreciate listening to RP as much as I do.
 fredriley wrote:

I strongly suspect that you're right. The Republican side in the Spanish Revolution/Civil War (take your pick according to political viewpoint) was desperately short of arms to fight Franco's forces as the Western capitalist countries enforced a strict arms embargo. This had zero effect on the Francoists as they had all the army stockpiles and were being supplied by fascist Italy and Nazi Germany, and had plenty of money to buy more on the black market. Effectively the Western powers sided, implicitly, with the Francoist rebels, by denying the Republicans, who were the legitimately constituted and elected government, the means to defend themselves. France also closed its border with Spain so that anti-fascists could not legimately join the Republicans so the thousands of volunteers for the struggle had to smuggle themselves across the border. 

Even at the time this was morally and politically shameful, and it soon came back to bite the Western powers when Nazi Germany attacked them. The simple lesson from history is: oppose fascism wherever it rears its ugly head.

I was really taken with this song even as a kid when I knew zip about the Spanish Revolution, and it's got a special significance for me now that I'm a bit more aware.  With the other Al Stewart songs played by RP I've really come to respect the guy immensely. 9 from the Nottingham jury, though in truth songs as profound and moving as this are insulted by ratings. 




It`s known, that Franco`s troups came from Africa (Morocco). "From Africa the winds they talk of changes"...
 fredriley wrote:

I strongly suspect that you're right. The Republican side in the Spanish Revolution/Civil War (take your pick according to political viewpoint) was desperately short of arms to fight Franco's forces as the Western capitalist countries enforced a strict arms embargo. This had zero effect on the Francoists as they had all the army stockpiles and were being supplied by fascist Italy and Nazi Germany, and had plenty of money to buy more on the black market. Effectively the Western powers sided, implicitly, with the Francoist rebels, by denying the Republicans, who were the legitimately constituted and elected government, the means to defend themselves. France also closed its border with Spain so that anti-fascists could not legimately join the Republicans so the thousands of volunteers for the struggle had to smuggle themselves across the border. 

Even at the time this was morally and politically shameful, and it soon came back to bite the Western powers when Nazi Germany attacked them. The simple lesson from history is: oppose fascism wherever it rears its ugly head.

I was really taken with this song even as a kid when I knew zip about the Spanish Revolution, and it's got a special significance for me now that I'm a bit more aware.  With the other Al Stewart songs played by RP I've really come to respect the guy immensely. 9 from the Nottingham jury, though in truth songs as profound and moving as this are insulted by ratings. 



For a good read on the chaos that was the Spanish Civil War, I highly recommend reading Homage to Catalonia by George Orwell. It is a personal account of his experiences and observations in the Spanish Civil War which he fought in. 
 Stratocaster wrote:

This would be soooo good if the guitars didn't have those farty piezo pickups they used in the 80s and 90s. The musicianship is just excellent on this version...but those piezos...ugh.




I AGREE!! Piezo pickups  have a huge peak between 400-500hz, and a raspy hi-end!!! NASTY!!! ...even the expensive Frap pickups by Arnie Lazerus! ...Barcus Berry were the worst!
This would be soooo good if the guitars didn't have those farty piezo pickups they used in the 80s and 90s. The musicianship is just excellent on this version...but those piezos...ugh.
A few years ago we attended an Al Stewart concert at the Musical Instrument Museum in Phoenix (299 seat auditorium). Prior to performing this piece Al stated that he was very proud of this tune because he felt he prophesized the present political situation with the line,

"The spirit of the century
Telling us that we're all standing on the border"

Thus, while you may surmise that the tune is about this or that conflict, the real point is that this is a tune with a universal message. 
so very fine
this really kicks on a good stereo

holy smokes
Haven't heard this version. Very good. Thanks.
Thank god for FLAC files!
 RobinD wrote:

For some reason, several months ago, I went searching for music by Al Stewart, & ended up compiling a playlist of approximately 40 songs.  I am especially fond of "Life in Dark Water".  The lyrics & music are beautifully haunting.  I am hoping I am fortunate enough to see Mr. Stewart in concert sooner than later.  Peace.  

From my collection you'd have had around 210 to choose from...! Very few duffies, but many stand-outs.

It doesn't get any better than this version on FLAC codec running through a DAC on studio monitors. With a glass or two of your favorite 12 year old libation, you realize life is good with Bill, Rebecca and RP.

My monthly donation has been the best lifetime entertainment value.
I never noticed how close this song is to 'Alone again or" by Love. Anyway it's a great song live.
 brianlj wrote:

And as we look around today, what do we see?
 

Ugly heads :(
 fredriley wrote:

 The simple lesson from history is: oppose fascism wherever it rears its ugly head.

 
And as we look around today, what do we see?
Love this song and acoustics. Best with loss-less on HiFi
At what point do acoustic guitar strings burst into flame?  
 RobinD wrote:
For some reason, several months ago, I went searching for music by Al Stewart, & ended up compiling a playlist of approximately 40 songs.  I am especially fond of "Life in Dark Water".  The lyrics & music are beautifully haunting.  I am hoping I am fortunate enough to see Mr. Stewart in concert sooner than later.  Peace.  
 
Well worth the price of admission!


energia allo stato puro - bravo
Love how u only play the live version of this, Bill. 
my favorite is Roads to Moscow but this rocks as well
For some reason, several months ago, I went searching for music by Al Stewart, & ended up compiling a playlist of approximately 40 songs.  I am especially fond of "Life in Dark Water".  The lyrics & music are beautifully haunting.  I am hoping I am fortunate enough to see Mr. Stewart in concert sooner than later.  Peace.  
 Cyclehawk wrote:
Great version of this! 

 

99 times out of 100 the original is best!
 mrpixel wrote:
11 please.
 
I second that
Saw Al live singing this last year. Awesome, and he was a great guy and great performer as well.
11 please.
Only an 8 before so it can go to a 9 now. Yes! Everything... Al Stewart! 
This gets a solid 8 from me.  Love the guitar, vocals...everything.  
 LizK wrote:
8 > 9    Stewart writes important songs, not fluff
 
I agree  
8 > 9    Stewart writes important songs, not fluff
every time this comes on the volume goes way up, love this song, and the live version even better than the studio. got to see him in a very small concert in Vail colorado way back. great then , great now
Damn this guy is good.
What a great bunch of guitar playing.
If you think "Year Of The Cat is a great album - check out "Past, Present and Future" - it's even better
Been loving Al Stewart since I saw him several times in the 1970s. Played the album Orange to death - particularly The News from Spain
 Grayson wrote:
That was cool, even if rather rushed through. Who has ever heard a live version of On the Border?! Well, not me. Until now. Come to think of it, I can't think of anyone off the top of my head who ever went to an Al Stewart show. But I now must assume there was such a thing.  

 
Oh yes, my friend, there IS such a thing! Circa 1983, Small outdoor venue, Humphrey's By the Bay on Shelter Island. Sponsored by "Lights Out San Diego" It was a magnificent thing.....
{#Devil_pimp}zesty !
To me 8 - Most Excellent  
On the Border. 

Has a whole different making now. ..or maybe not. 
That was cool, even if rather rushed through. Who has ever heard a live version of On the Border?! Well, not me. Until now. Come to think of it, I can't think of anyone off the top of my head who ever went to an Al Stewart show. But I now must assume there was such a thing.  
To me 8 - Most Excellent 
{#Guitarist}  fantabulicious!  {#Bananasplit}
11+
Excellent {#Bananajam}
Great version of this! 

Oh, did they start the song? That instrumental lead-in had me ready for a nap...
 BBoyes wrote:

Ambrosia... wow, yes I have that vinyl. Have to dig that one out! Amazing they are still together and still playing!

 
More trivia around Alan Parsons .....the members of Ambrosia played on several of his first solo album "Tales of Mystery and Imagination"....notably "The Raven". 


Peter White is / was Al Stewart's guitar player for many years....on several albums and as part of the touring band. 
 
{#Sunny}
 BBoyes wrote:
When the intro started I had to tab over and see who this was. Al Stewart? Really? I had no idea... this is some superb guitar! Ah, he was born in Glasgow - that explains it!

 
That's Peter White playing lead guitar.
Love Al Stewart and I love this track, and normally, I dislike live versions, but I love this version!
On the Border and customs too.
nice, so you have a perfect blend of music, cordial greetings from Germany{#Music}
 jhorton wrote:
How about some, " Roads to Moscow?" 

 
RP plays that moving song on a regular basis.
Damn, Bill, that was a smooth transition from "For 12"!  
 molson wrote:
A little trivia here. Year Of The Cat, Ambrosia's debut album and Pink Floyds Dark Side Of The Moon were all produced by none other than Alan Parsons of Alan Parsons Project. I believe Ambrosia's record is the only American band Alan ever produced. Kind of interesting....I think{#Music}

 
Ambrosia... wow, yes I have that vinyl. Have to dig that one out! Amazing they are still together and still playing!
When the intro started I had to tab over and see who this was. Al Stewart? Really? I had no idea... this is some superb guitar! Ah, he was born in Glasgow - that explains it!

Back in the day I didn't pay as much attention as I should have because Year of the Cat got a lot of airplay and was pretty mainstream pop-rock IMO. He's worthy of a much closer look. From WikiPedia:

Stewart was a key figure in British music and he appears throughout the musical folklore of the revivalist era. He played at the first-ever Glastonbury Festival in 1970, knew Yoko Ono before she met John Lennon, shared a London flat with a young Paul Simon, and hosted at the Les Cousins folk club in London in the 1960s.
...
Both albums reached the top ten in the US, with "Year of the Cat" peaking at No. 5 and "Time Passages" at No. 10, and both albums produced hit singles in the US ("Year of the Cat" No. 8, and "On the Border", #42; "Time Passages" No. 7 and "Song on the Radio", #29). Meanwhile "Year of the Cat" became Stewart's first chart single in Britain, where it peaked at No. 31. It was a huge success at London's Capital Radio, reaching number 2 on their Capital Countdown chart. The overwhelming success of these songs on the two albums, both of which still receive substantial radio airplay on classic-rock/pop format radio stations, has perhaps later overshadowed the depth and range of Stewart's body of songwriting.

Al
 molson wrote:
A little trivia here. Year Of The Cat, Ambrosia's debut album and Pink Floyds Dark Side Of The Moon were all produced by none other than Alan Parsons of Alan Parsons Project. I believe Ambrosia's record is the only American band Alan ever produced. Kind of interesting....I think{#Music}

 
Great information, I am a huge AP fan.
Always good to here this one.
Never heard this version.  Very nice.
Bumping up to 10 for this live version.  Always loved Al's music and lyrics.
A little trivia here. Year Of The Cat, Ambrosia's debut album and Pink Floyds Dark Side Of The Moon were all produced by none other than Alan Parsons of Alan Parsons Project. I believe Ambrosia's record is the only American band Alan ever produced. Kind of interesting....I think{#Music}
 coyote620 wrote:

I don't know what I like more, what you wrote or the song.

 
Great comment.  Cynaera's comments were always unique and uplifting to read.  RIP Anne. 
 Cynaera wrote:
I love Al Stewart's music. He's right in my realm, from the vocals to the music, and everything in between. Something about his voice makes me want to protect him, but his words tell me he needs no protection. This song just makes me want to yell out loud, or send up a batch of balloons, or grill a perfect steak... He makes me feel alive. Always has, always will.

 
I don't know what I like more, what you wrote or the song.
 Cynaera wrote:
I love Al Stewart's music. He's right in my realm, from the vocals to the music, and everything in between. Something about his voice makes me want to protect him, but his words tell me he needs no protection. This song just makes me want to yell out loud, or send up a batch of balloons, or grill a perfect steak... He makes me feel alive. Always has, always will.

 
reading this and the strong sounds of Al Stewart are life affirming
I think he went out to smoke a joint.
that's what this song was used for in the days of FM.
Am I having deja vu or did this just repeat?
 jagdriver wrote:

Peter White did the studio recording. My guess is that he also performed live with Al.

Peter has several albums of his own worth checking out. 

 
We've also seen Peter in concert; he's worth going to see.
Wow
 bachbeet wrote:
Never liked Al Stewart.  I was definitely not one of those who bought his Year of the Cat.
 
I'm with you, although (like Miles Davis and Sade) the instrumental backing is usually quite phenomenal. Al knows how to pick sidemen!
 msymmes wrote:
Is Al playing the guitar?  I don't have a clue.  But if so, good for him !
 

 
Peter White did the studio recording. My guess is that he also performed live with Al.

(EDIT Jan. 20, 2015: I just zoomed in on the cover, where it reads, Featuring Peter White.)

Peter has several albums of his own worth checking out. 
Is Al playing the guitar?  I don't have a clue.  But if so, good for him !
 
Wonderful version of a really good song.
 SeanMichael wrote:
The love here lately on RP for Jethro Tull and Al Stewart reminds me of this somewhat unflattering article I read a while back:
https://www.elsewhere.co.nz/mybackpages/771/jethro-tull-al-stewart-hanging-on-the-telephone/

 
I don't know much about Al Stewart beyond three songs, but I could imagine Ian Anderson being caught up in himself and his own world. He has/had a prog rock-Ren Faire niche that probably still brings in money and it's not as if he can break away from it at this point. Too bad he couldn't stop talking long enough at the music journalist Graham Reid during a telephone interview to interact a little more. 

But this is telling: 

These phoners aren't all irredeemably bad: I've had what I consider fine conversations with Miles Davis (see Inner Visions) and people interviewed-out artists like Kris Kristofferson, Branford Marsalis, David Bowie and Elvis Costello.

My guess is that those good calls are few and far between. 

 
 fredriley wrote:

.... simple lesson from history is: oppose fascism wherever it rears its ugly head.

.....

 
I'll second that sentiment.  Particularly in light of having grown up on Nazi military occupation stories.  

Then maybe we should extend that sentiment to things like ethnic cleansing campaigns such as the one that continues in the Jordan Valley and elsewhere in the holy lands.  

Behold the blow back.   
 Hogtownmike wrote:
Even though I really like the studio/album cut, I really like this live cut--particularly the extra Spanish guitar flourishes...

 
..... this version is growing on me :))
Even though I really like the studio/album cut, I really like this live cut--particularly the extra Spanish guitar flourishes...
 clwguy wrote:
The non-live version is much better

 
...... totally agree
How about some, " Roads to Moscow?" 
I love Mexican food...I always run for the border.
 SeanMichael wrote:
The love here lately on RP for Jethro Tull and Al Stewart reminds me of this somewhat unflattering article I read a while back:
https://www.elsewhere.co.nz/mybackpages/771/jethro-tull-al-stewart-hanging-on-the-telephone/

 
I have been told that Ian Anderson of Jethro Tull can go on and on about salmon farming.  

 

 

JT was awfully successful for mediocre rock.


This reminds me of seeing Al and his band in a small venue in the mid 80s.  I'd rank it somewhere in the top 10 shows I've ever seen.
 
The love here lately on RP for Jethro Tull and Al Stewart reminds me of this somewhat unflattering article I read a while back:
https://www.elsewhere.co.nz/mybackpages/771/jethro-tull-al-stewart-hanging-on-the-telephone/
The non-live version is much better
Dueling Guitars ... I Love It
 
Much better than original version.{#Bananajam}
A pretentious piece of crap.
 Cynaera wrote:
I love Al Stewart's music. He's right in my realm, from the vocals to the music, and everything in between. Something about his voice makes me want to protect him, but his words tell me he needs no protection. This song just makes me want to yell out loud, or send up a batch of balloons, or grill a perfect steak... He makes me feel alive. Always has, always will.
 

Still miss you so much, Cynaera...

love this live version...
bad ass
what?????
 Shesdifferent wrote:
I love Al Stewart, I've seen him live a few times and he's great.....but this live version doesn't translate to "radio" very well. I prefer the regular version. Play more Al Stewart. How about Lord Grenville?
 
WOW, you mentioned Lord Grenville - my favourite Al Stewart song!!
I've been on the border numerous times. The border between toilet and pants, that is.
I've always loved Al Stewart's voice, from the first time I heard "Year of the Cat" in the 70's (he's an example of a non-macho voiced male that I swoon over) love it. I still stop to listen to him
Before I looked up and saw who it was, I was thinking this might be something off the new Joe Bonamassa live album.  May have to give old Al another listen.
 JIan wrote:

Thank you fredriley!  Your words definitely added to this fabulous guitar work and the verse for me.
 
Everything I have read about that war shows that there were no clean hands. The people who just wanted to raise their children, earn a living and come home at night were slaughtered... Nothing has changed. bad guys kill the innocent. Good guys do also.  Who is bad or good is up to you. The French Revolution set the pattern for all revolutions that followed.... Killing is easy. Governing is hard. The winners always promise too much and find they cannot deliver without taking more from those in the middle.... which angers the middle and fires up the young and radical...and off we go again.

yes, there are some things worth dying for. They are also the things worth killing to protect. One should be clear about that line and aware of the consequences of both aggression and response.  be clear. 

Education: history, poetry, music, foreign flavors...all Just That Easy.    Music for people who thing as well as those who just like to dance. His song about the 9 million Germans who wer captured by Russia and never seen again is very realistic. Remids us all that war is an ugly business. That average people "go where sent. Do as told" and pay the price. It's also a lesson that governments cannot be trusted. There are no good guys, no bad guys just national "interests".... Smaller governments kill fewer of their citizens than the large all-encompassing governments... There is no Free Lunch and no friends in government.
 Cynaera wrote:
I love Al Stewart's music. He's right in my realm, from the vocals to the music, and everything in between. Something about his voice makes me want to protect him, but his words tell me he needs no protection. This song just makes me want to yell out loud, or send up a batch of balloons, or grill a perfect steak... He makes me feel alive. Always has, always will.
  ....goosebumps while reading THIS................smiley
....and THANX, ROMEO for all your comments.......wish i could visit you in your hotel room.......


Politics aside...I LOVE the playing in this all of it, every note. Peter White is amazing.
 fredriley wrote:

I strongly suspect that you're right. The Republican side in the Spanish Revolution/Civil War (take your pick according to political viewpoint) was desperately short of arms to fight Franco's forces as the Western capitalist countries enforced a strict arms embargo. This had zero effect on the Francoists as they had all the army stockpiles and were being supplied by fascist Italy and Nazi Germany, and had plenty of money to buy more on the black market. Effectively the Western powers sided, implicitly, with the Francoist rebels, by denying the Republicans, who were the legitimately constituted and elected government, the means to defend themselves. France also closed its border with Spain so that anti-fascists could not legimately join the Republicans so the thousands of volunteers for the struggle had to smuggle themselves across the border. 

Even at the time this was morally and politically shameful, and it soon came back to bite the Western powers when Nazi Germany attacked them. The simple lesson from history is: oppose fascism wherever it rears its ugly head.

I was really taken with this song even as a kid when I knew zip about the Spanish Revolution, and it's got a special significance for me now that I'm a bit more aware.  With the other Al Stewart songs played by RP I've really come to respect the guy immensely. 9 from the Nottingham jury, though in truth songs as profound and moving as this are insulted by ratings. 

 
Thank you fredriley!  Your words definitely added to this fabulous guitar work and the verse for me.
 fredriley wrote:

I strongly suspect that you're right. The Republican side in the Spanish Revolution/Civil War (take your pick according to political viewpoint) was desperately short of arms to fight Franco's forces as the Western capitalist countries enforced a strict arms embargo. This had zero effect on the Francoists as they had all the army stockpiles and were being supplied by fascist Italy and Nazi Germany, and had plenty of money to buy more on the black market. Effectively the Western powers sided, implicitly, with the Francoist rebels, by denying the Republicans, who were the legitimately constituted and elected government, the means to defend themselves. France also closed its border with Spain so that anti-fascists could not legimately join the Republicans so the thousands of volunteers for the struggle had to smuggle themselves across the border. 

Even at the time this was morally and politically shameful, and it soon came back to bite the Western powers when Nazi Germany attacked them. The simple lesson from history is: oppose fascism wherever it rears its ugly head.

I was really taken with this song even as a kid when I knew zip about the Spanish Revolution, and it's got a special significance for me now that I'm a bit more aware.  With the other Al Stewart songs played by RP I've really come to respect the guy immensely. 9 from the Nottingham jury, though in truth songs as profound and moving as this are insulted by ratings. 

 
Yes fredriley, reading your post while the song played today, gave it that much more depth.

I'm an RP fanatic, but even so — there's too often vacuous drek getting far more air time than this wonderful piece; not to mention that another wonder: Roads to Moscow!


Never liked Al Stewart.  I was definitely not one of those who bought his Year of the Cat.
This is a very good album, altho there are better versions of this particular song elsewhere.  If you're a fan, also check out the live recording from a couple years back, Uncorked, which is excellent. 
I love Al Stewart, I've seen him live a few times and he's great.....but this live version doesn't translate to "radio" very well. I prefer the regular version. Play more Al Stewart. How about Lord Grenville?
Not a huge Al Stewart fan, but this version is outstanding.